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Could you teach in a public school setting after homeschooling?<br><br>
My rant..vent..its long..sorry.<br><br>
Before I had children I worked in a small childcare setting and pictured myself becoming a teacher. I became a hairstylist and alternated between that and childcare.<br><br>
I went to community college and took health and science req's for nursing program. Became pg with first ds and divorced before he was born. I decided to keep working as a stylist for better income.<br><br>
I remarried with 2 step-dd's and quit school to be home with ds (dx'd with developmental delays) and dd's while working part time.<br><br>
I just kept working in salons because the money was decent and it allowed me to spend time with my family. I was able to homeschool and still work pt. It has worked out ok ..but I wanted to try something besides hair and just got busy with life and kids.<br><br>
We were planning on moving and I gave my notice at work. Things changed and we aren't moving now. I told dh I didn't want to continue to work in the salon..money is not as good with the economy and I am just tired of standing behind the chair. After so many years..I am bored with it.<br><br>
Dh said that he wanted me to do something I wanted to do. He suggested I go to the school district and pursue a teaching cert. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/ROTFLMAO.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rotflmao">. We discussed this on and off through the years..but my view has changed.<br><br>
I have so many issues with our school district that would require a whole thread..I am just going to say they are under federal investigation for problems with their special needs..the asst. principle and 2 other teachers in district are suspended for xxx conduct with minors.<br><br>
Our state is the next to last on the worst states for education. If I chose to go to another district..there are still so many problems.<br><br>
Dh thinks I am being negative. I tried to explain to him that if you see a system that is not working or doing more harm that it is hard to want to join the ranks. We also have my step-dd (12) that wants to become a teacher someday.<br><br>
I really love teaching and seeing kids learn. I would love to work with special needs children , but after homeschooling and knowing the difference between the ps and homeschool I don't know if I could do it. Dh says that is the reason I should do it and that would make all the difference. I know that homeschool is not forever and I nee<br>
I feel like I did when I was 20..what do I want to do when I grow up <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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As a former public school teacher, I would encourage you not to think about "the system" when making this decision, but about the individual kids you would be working with. "Public school" is not the monolithic entity it is often made out to be in this forum, but an organization of real, live people with hopes and dreams and strengths and weaknesses, just like any other. You will not be working in "public school" but in one particular classroom with 25 or so individual kids, who you could impact greatly with your experience. In my experience, teachers have a lot of freedom as to methodology and materials. It's what you make it.
 

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I have a freind who homeschooled her 5 children through high school, and just recently became a private school teacher. She went back to school when her two youngest were in high school. She actually finds it very fulfilling,a nd feels like she is havinga positive impact on "the system".<br><br>
That said, my sister is a PS teacher, and I really am sad when I her stories about how she handles her classroom. I think the PS system could really use more "Hs mentality" teachers. I think it's probably harrd to pull off, but if you're motivated, worth a try.
 

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I too have sometimes contemplated teaching as a career. Right now I limit myself to tutoring, since the pay is good and I can set my own hours and standards. I may yet become a teacher, but I hesitate sometimes because it isn't just about your classroom of kids, it is also about dealing with the politics of being in a union and dealing with the principal and other administration.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Geerbabe</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15425241"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I too have sometimes contemplated teaching as a career. Right now I limit myself to tutoring, since the pay is good and I can set my own hours and standards. I may yet become a teacher, but I hesitate sometimes because it isn't just about your classroom of kids, it is also about dealing with the politics of being in a union and dealing with the principal and other administration.</div>
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You can opt out of the union if you want to (although I can't see why one would want to. Our union rocks!).<br><br>
I love teaching public school. I did have to fight administration types to do some of the stuff I do (silly things like my name preference!) , but it was totally worth it. Now I get to see my former students go off to college and life, and see how their education impacted their worldview. Truly glorwonderious stuff!<br><br>
Teaching is really draining, and very time consuming (to do it well). But it is the most fulfilling thing I have ever done.<br><br>
On the other hand there are many out of work teachers right now because of the budget crisis, so that is something to consider too.
 

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I do, I just went thru getting my teaching certificate (post bac) and it wasn't that bad. I'm still subbing - and will probably sub again next year. I love homeschooling and will never put my son in public school but I love teaching. I may go back and get a 2nd endorsement ( either english or history/economics) I currently have a CTE/business certificate and jobs are few and far between.<br><br>
I love subbing for now and honestly I need to get off my duff and get my name on the list with a few more districts.<br><br>
I don't know what state you are in but we are very low for ed. standards and performance as well (thats why I homeschool).
 

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Moved from Learning at Home and Beyond to Working and Student Parents.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Chamomile Girl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15425317"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can opt out of the union if you want to (although I can't see why one would want to. Our union rocks!).</div>
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If only it were that easy!<br><br>
Depends on the state, as there are only 22 states that do not allow unions to impose mandatory dues and fees.<br><br>
I can think of many, many reasons why I wish to opt out of my union. Additionally, I understand why many other teachers want to opt-out of theirs, especially for religious convictions.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ikesmom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15424761"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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I really love teaching and seeing kids learn. I would love to work with special needs children</div>
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Special education is such a TOUGH area, primarily because of all the paperwork, restrictions and administration surrounding special ed.<br><br>
Some of the greatest teachers I know and who get to do some amazing work with special needs children are occupational therapists.
 

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Dh is a public high school teacher and I'm in higher ed. We don't homeschool our kids, but do a great deal of education with them outside the classroom.<br><br>
One of the things that strikes me about the OP, is that it sounds more like your husband's idea or desire for you to teach than it is your desire. Do you really want to be a teacher? Is it a passion for you?<br><br>
While I do agree that public schools are not a monolithic block, most ps teachers do face similar kinds of issues. Teaching for dh was a second career, one he adored for the first several years. With NCLB, not so much. It really is increasingly all about testing in many public school settings, and it's sucked the joy out of his job. It's also done a great deal to rob children of a real education.<br><br>
In dh's situation, the union is the most positive thing going. I shudder to think what the education situation would be like if they didn't have a strong union.
 

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I'm a PS teacher, and I can say for a fact that there is a big difference between the institution of PS (including unions) and the day to day life of a teacher in the classroom. Day to day I interact with kids, do my best to spark a love of learning in them, and teach them my content (I'm middle level). Yes, there are many issues in public education, and you will not find many teachers that don't have a complaint or two about how the district/state/federal gov't are sticking noses in our classrooms. But on a day to day level, these impacts are minor.<br><br>
Within a district, even, there can be major differences from school to school. If you are serious about becoming a teacher, I would encourage you to sub for a year or so within the district so that you can get a "feel" for the different schools and how they operate. Not all buildings, grade levels, or classrooms are the same. They are what they are due to the people that are there.<br><br>
The only other issue that may pop up is if you completed your degree at CC. Under NCLB, you must hold a college degree to be a teacher. So if you didn't complete your studies, you would need to go back and do that first in order to be eligible for a teaching license. In today's economy, it is very difficult to get a job without a license.<br><br>
Good luck, and let us know if you make a decision.
 

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I'm a teacher, and I love my job despite all the bull: because of my students.<br><br>
BUT, it sounds to me like you don't want to teach. Teaching is really hard and stressful work (for a lot of reasons) and if you don't really really want to teach, I think it's a bad idea to put yourself in a classroom.<br>
If you haven't tried it and just want to see what it's like, sub or volunteer in a classroom for the age group you are interested in. That will tell you a lot more.<br><br>
Or, have you thought about working for a private or alternative school? That might give you more of the teaching experience you are looking for...closer to homeschool.
 

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I have to agree with the general flow of responses. Unless this is something *you* want then I'd look for an alternative.<br><br>
I went back to work because of a divorce. I wanted to work "my kids hours." Well, except for the vacations (which is cool, I will grant you), I *do not* work my kids' hours -- as other folks have said -- time consuming and stressful.<br><br>
I love what I do; I get totally into my day, but it also drains me and that is hard on my family.<br><br>
Tutoring sounds like an option; OT sounds like an option and both give you more flexibility and good money.<br><br>
Just a thought.<br><br>
M
 

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I'm a teacher for K students with special needs (ASDs) in an inclusion setting and it is HARD. Enjoyable, rewarding, but VERY hard. You need to want to do it 100% to be able to push through all of the endless daily work that is required of you. Now, this varies greatly by district, but in my district teaching at any level and general ed or special ed-- it's all grueling.<br><br>
Every single minute of your day needs to be documented (often in numerous locations)-- planned, differentiated, assessed, small groups based on those assessments, conference with every child individually in every subject either weekly or daily depending on the student, and every single interaction you have must be written out on a organizational sheet you created and put in binders so that at any moment any person could walk in your room and pull out a binder and see exactly what every student is individually working on in every subject. And this is just a tip of the iceberg. So the "teaching" part is maybe 1/3 of the job, the paperwork is 2/3. Meaning, the hours are LONG.
 

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I used to think really horrible things about the school system before I actually started doing my observations for my teaching classes and I have to say that I was really surprised by how much I loved our school system. There are some bad teachers in it and I am currently homeschooling my dd because her teacher was one of them, but overall I love it and I plan on sending her back and being part of the school system if I can find a job in it. The fact that there are bad teacher's and that some schools don't have the greatest test scores really doesn't affect my love of teaching and my hope to do so again very soon. I enjoy the excitement of getting to know my students and finding ways to reach all of my students. It is complicated and exhilirating all at the same time. If teaching isn't something that you find appealing then you shouldn't do it. If you do think it would be fun then you should do it and not let the fact that schools have supervisors and some bad apples get in your way. If I loved cutting hair I wouldn't let the fact that I have had some bad stylists doing my hair get in my way of that dream. There are people who are bad at their job no matter what you do, but the good ones are more plentiful and you could be one of them if that is what you want to be.
 

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okay, so if you really want to aim high, get a master's in education (or whatever degree you need to become a principle, etc) you could open a charter school that is public but still is more flexible with what you do with curriculum, etc. Just a crazy idea that I had just now...but maybe not so crazy.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>moonyoungi</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15429821"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">okay, so if you really want to aim high, get a master's in education (or whatever degree you need to become a principle, etc) you could open a charter school that is public but still is more flexible with what you do with curriculum, etc. Just a crazy idea that I had just now...but maybe not so crazy.</div>
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Principals work insane hours. The day job is just the beginning. Then there are all the evening events, weekend events, meetings, dealing with the public, trying to sell the budget, fundraising, etc. The administrative credential is different than the teaching credential.<br><br>
I can't imagine how anybody could do it with small children.
 

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Another voice for the don't do it if you don't love it camp.<br><br>
And also, regarding the administration thing - I did it with a one year old. Lasted one year and went back into the classroom. It was too. much. work. to try and be the mom of a one year old at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I had a long post addressing everyones comments yesterday and it disappeared after it tells you to back button blah!<br><br>
I posted this in homeschooling and it was moved.<br>
I agree a lot about what is being said in response. I want to say thank you to those who continue to teach despite whatever difficulties come with it.<br><br><br>
I realize I sound negative and that is the problem..why I posted. We moved into a small town with one district that has a lot of problems. The property taxes are cheap and there isn't much parent support. Prior to our move I volunteered in the classroom..was on advisory committee..and literacy outreach for our community.. United Way programs ect. I would love to do OT -they just increased the requirements last year. There is only one school that offers a graduate degree program here and it is over 75 miles away.<br><br>
My oldest dd homeschooled most of this year , but decided she wanted to finish out 10th grade at school. She has a 2hr bus ride each morning to go to the school that offers her the credits she needs as pre req's for veterinary school. She was recently accepted into equestrian program and even though it is a once in a lifetime opportunity ( they only accept 250 students) she is still undecided because it is so far. She would have her AA by graduation which would be nice.<br><br>
The one thing that is positive for pursuing the teaching career is that I could earn my certificate through the district right down the street. I could take the classes in the evening and 4 hours on Saturdays. I would have to sign a Teach Grant contract to work at an at-risk school ( all the schools in our area) for at least 3 years after my certification. I don't see us moving in the next few years.<br><br>
Anyway..I have to decide soon. Thank you for all your input esp the positive experiences. I need to hear them. I will update when I decide!
 

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Have you read Family Matters, by David Guterson? It's mostly about homeschooling, but he wrote it as a homeschooling dad who also taught public high school....he seemed to manage it.
 
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