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<a href="http://www.palmbeachpost.com/accent/content/accent/epaper/2006/05/17/a3e_healthnotes_0517.html" target="_blank">http://www.palmbeachpost.com/accent/...otes_0517.html</a><br><br>
This article was in my local paper this morning. It irritated me, as I don't really think that my daughter should be going to a surgeon when she is 13 years old, provided that she is healthy. Would midwives address the same issues that were mentioned in the article? ("Physicians can discuss normal development, menstruation, sexuality, healthy eating habits, safety and injury prevention, and date rape prevention with teens. It also gives ob-gyns an opportunity to address problems that may require early intervention such as eating disorders and weight issues, blood pressure problems, and mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, and physical, sexual, and emotional abuse.") I am pretty certain that most midwives will do well woman exams and birth control issues. I was thinking of writing a letter to the editor addressing this article and suggesting that people bring their daughters to midwives for these sorts of things!
 

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I don't know of any OBGYNs that would actually take the time to do that.<br><br>
I'd much rather have my daughter see a midwife at that stage. (Maybe it'll be me by then!)
 

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Midwives here (Ontario, Canada) don't do any well-woman care outside of pregnancy and the 6-weeks post-partum period.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>turtlewomyn</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><a href="http://www.palmbeachpost.com/accent/content/accent/epaper/2006/05/17/a3e_healthnotes_0517.html" target="_blank">http://www.palmbeachpost.com/accent/...otes_0517.html</a><br><br>
This article was in my local paper this morning. It irritated me, as I don't really think that my daughter should be going to a surgeon when she is 13 years old, provided that she is healthy. Would midwives address the same issues that were mentioned in the article? ("Physicians can discuss normal development, menstruation, sexuality, healthy eating habits, safety and injury prevention, and date rape prevention with teens. It also gives ob-gyns an opportunity to address problems that may require early intervention such as eating disorders and weight issues, blood pressure problems, and mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, and physical, sexual, and emotional abuse.") I am pretty certain that most midwives will do well woman exams and birth control issues. I was thinking of writing a letter to the editor addressing this article and suggesting that people bring their daughters to midwives for these sorts of things!</div>
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Umm...<br><br>
That's a PARENTS Job to discuss with their teen daughter...Not a medical professional.<br><br>
If you have a great relationship with your teen, then talk to them about it. It would be traumatising for a young girl to be dragged to a Dr told to disrobe and all that good stuff.<br><br>
Heck it would be embarrasing even if she were taken to a midwife for this...
 

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I do believe teens need to see a provider sooner rather than later. I frequently would see teens 16-18 having their first pap and having it come back positive for dysplasia related to HPV. HPV requires 3-5 years to progress to dysplasia, so young teens need to be educated. Ideally, yes, it would be the parents, but there are a lot of parents who don't, for whatever reason. Also, to access prescription contraception teens need to be seen by a provider.<br><br>
In Washington, teens over 13 can seek reproductive health care without parental consent, and it's illegal for providers to tell parents. I think this is absolutely critical for patient safety.
 

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Hmmm. I didn't have my first pap until I was 18 and it was done by a CNM. I wish that I had had that visit sooner though, I had a lot of questions for her that my mom wouldn't or couldn't answer.<br><br>
I think that MWs could certainly be giving well women care to girls rather than OBs.
 

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Of course, if your daughter is not sexually active (my sisters and I all waited until marriage) then there is really no need to go, unless the child has a problem (bad periods or whatnot).
 

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I think it's a good idea. And in the article, they state that it's not for an exam. The visit is so that the girl learns about OB/GYN's and female healthcare and begins to develop a trust relationship with this doctor. The OB/GYN I visited was my mother's dr. He was great: gentle, quiet, interested, and took a lot of time with me at every visit, whether it was just for birth control advice, an exam, etc. I now see a GP along with the rest of my family to keep our care consistent w/in the family, but if I had to go see an OB/GYN, I wish I could go to him (we moved across country).<br><br>
I agree with the idea that seeing a midwife would be better, but not every area has midwives who provide well-woman care. And not every woman is comfortable having her well-woman care provided by her GP. IMO, every girl should have a sense of independence in terms of sexuality and reproductive repsonsibility. Having a sensible and trusting connection with a good well-woman provider will help her learn to make smart choices about sex, reproduction, and healthcare.
 

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I think I had a good relationship with my mother, but I would never have dreamed of telling her I was considering having sex at the age I did. I'm not sure I would have trusted a doctor or midwife to not tell her, but I think it is proabably a good idea to at least have the option to discuss it with someone who could provide access to birth control.<br><br>
Definitely something I will keep in mind.
 

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I went to the OB/GYN for the first time at 17. I was not sexually active, but I was suffering from amenorrhea. If I'd not had that problem, I probably wouldn't have had an exam till I joined the Air Force (18).<br><br>
Can CPMs do well-woman exams? What about paps?
 

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Some CPMs do do well womyn work.<br>
I saw my first OB when I was 14. I had an terrible realiationship with my mother adn I kept my period a secret from her for months (I got it at age 10). This OB was at a free clinic and she was wonderfull.<br>
I think it all depends on situation.
 

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I always thought you were supposed to go after you started your period...like within 2 or 3 years.<br>
I went at 15 when I got mine, I wasnt sexually active but my mom took me away, in case there were things I didnt want to talk about with her. I think that was a smart move.<br>
I know CNM can do exams here in OHio, I can go to them for every "woman" thing, I dont know about anyother types though!
 

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i went for my first visit prior to my marriage at age 27. it was awful!!! the gyn didn't believe i was a virgin, didn't use the smallest speculum on me even tho i'd asked, had to start all over again because i was *very* small <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> and she couldn't see. then she didnt' take any of my concerns seriously, was very demeaning. I never went back until i saw a midwife prior to conceiving DD 3 yrs later. I wish I had just waited until then in the first place.<br><br>
So really I think it depends upon the teen and the midwife. (I hope my DD *NEVER* sees an ob/gyn under any circumstances.) I agree w a pp who said that many of those things are the parent's responsibility with their child not a doctor's. If a teen is sexually active then maybe it's a good idea. If not, then stay away. I first heard of vaginal exams around 13 and was so traumatized by the thought that i remember my mom telling me it wasn't true. I couldn't in a million years imagine some stranger/doctor sticking their hand inside of me!
 

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I think it is a good idea for teens to see some sort of caregiver, but I don't think it has to be an ob/gyn.<br><br>
I've never been to an ob/gyn, and don't intend to unless I have a problem.<br><br>
I see my family doctor for everything, except for pregnancy I have a midwife.
 

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I had my first exam at 15 and it was to get birth control. i had been sexually active for quite a while at that point also <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blush">:. At that appointment, they found I had an ectopic pregnancy that required emergency surgery - i had no idea and it was ready to rupture. I think it's a good idea for everyone who is sexually active to get an exam. That said, I don't think a girl should get an exam unless she is having sex, or having problems.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LeosMama</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think it's a good idea. And in the article, they state that it's not for an exam. The visit is so that the girl learns about OB/GYN's and female healthcare and begins to develop a trust relationship with this doctor. The OB/GYN I visited was my mother's dr. He was great: gentle, quiet, interested, and took a lot of time with me at every visit, whether it was just for birth control advice, an exam, etc. I now see a GP along with the rest of my family to keep our care consistent w/in the family, but if I had to go see an OB/GYN, I wish I could go to him (we moved across country).<br><br>
I agree with the idea that seeing a midwife would be better, but not every area has midwives who provide well-woman care. And not every woman is comfortable having her well-woman care provided by her GP. IMO, every girl should have a sense of independence in terms of sexuality and reproductive repsonsibility. Having a sensible and trusting connection with a good well-woman provider will help her learn to make smart choices about sex, reproduction, and healthcare.</div>
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leosmom,<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/truedat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Truedat"><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:<br><br>
I'm with you on most of this.<br><br>
My story is I had my first GYN appointment when I was a few months away from turning 21. It was my mom's GYN. Heres the link to the thread I started when I switched the kind of provider of last and theres links in there to the other posts I did that are related to that topic. <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=387572" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=387572</a><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rocks.jpg" style="border:0px solid;" title="mdc rocks"><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/thanks.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thanks">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Pandora114</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Umm...<br><br>
That's a PARENTS Job to discuss with their teen daughter...Not a medical professional.<br><br>
If you have a great relationship with your teen, then talk to them about it. It would be traumatising for a young girl to be dragged to a Dr told to disrobe and all that good stuff.<br><br>
Heck it would be embarrasing even if she were taken to a midwife for this...</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">: I agree. I never even went to ANY Dr. till I got pregant w/ my first child. Even then it wasn't an OB, rather a family practitioner. Didn't see an OB till I was pg. with DC #3. I guess do what you're comfortable with but I just don't think it's important. (To rush in at age 13-ish, that is...personally, I would have been BEYOND mortified.)
 

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I will not bring my child to a doctor visit for that, I don't think it should be normal. If she's not comfortable talking about normal body functions with me, then I have failed as a parent. I will also encourage my children to abstain until they are married (DH and I did) but if they choose not to, I'll let them know that they might want to go get checked out and perhaps get the hepatitis B and (future, maybe) HPV vax. It's up to them at that point, sex does come with responsibility.<br><br>
For what it's worth, I've never had an internal exam ~there is no way I have HPV because DH and I have only been with eachother. I trust my body to function normally unless it proves otherwise. I went into one appointment before I got married because it was sorta what you are 'supposed to do' and it felt so wrong that I wouldn't let the FP doctor touch me (and she's a nice person, it just felt wrong) and never went back.<br><br>
I got birth control from planned parenthood because that's the only place I could get BC from without a pelvic... (now after reading more about that, I'll never be on BC again, we'll use NFP) And they were convinced that I was abused because I refused the pelvic. There's something messed up about that mentality- I'm not comfortable with someone looking up and feeling my most private parts and that means I'm abused? If I dn't have an explicit trust in all doctors, I'm sending up red flags?<br><br>
This 'routine' doctor appointment would just be feeding that lie, from what I can tell. Then, perhaps if we as parents do not automatically take our child at age 13 to go see a OB/GYN because we think that she's not ready for it or we think it should be covered by her parents, we will be considered abusive? We must have something to hide?<br><br>
Scary stuff.<br><br>
Cara
 

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I don't think anyone's saying that you'd be abusive or hiding something not to take your teen to an OB/GYN or other provider for sexual medical care.<br><br>
And nobody's saying that a 13 yo needs (or should have) a pelvic exam. I think it's a bad idea.<br><br>
But where you say that you will have failed as a parent if she can't talk to you about such things...it's not about you or your success as a parent. It's about the girl's needs. Two girls raised by the same wonderful parents could react totally differently to adolescence and sexuality. One girl may confide everything to her mother and feel comfortable asking questions about birth control and relationships and sexuality, and another daughter may not be comfortable with this. It doesn't mean the parents failed. It means that she is an individual and chooses not to discuss these things with her parents.<br><br>
I think it is responsible for the parents to provide a safe, trustworthy professional as a resource for their adolescent children to consult regarding all things sexual. It doesn't have to be an OB/GYN, but my opinion is that somebody needs to fulfill this role. Planned Parenthood? A midwife? A general practitioner? A counselor of some kind?<br><br>
I seriously feel like development of sexuality is one of the areas that needs access to independence from the parents. By that I mean that a parent shouldn't expect that s/he is going to be the main confidante of sexual questions/discussions. We break away from our parents in normal, healthy ways. Sexuality is a natural area, IMO, for this to manifest, and the child/woman needs guidance and a way to feel like she has control over her own sexual destiny. Why not help her to learn how to choose a health care provider to learn how to control her own sexual health and destiny within the framework of our culture?<br><br>
At some point, it is VERY possible that she will NEED to understand and operate within the paradigm of medical sexual care. An emergency transfer to hospital during labor? A set of symptoms she doesn't recognize that may mean a genital disease or STD? She needs to not be lost and overwhelmed, she needs to know how to control and manage her own care when confronted with an OB/GYN.<br><br>
It's important for her to learn that you go to med professionals when you're sick, and to midwives when you're not (routine screenings), if that's the healthcare paradigm you are raising her with.<br><br>
I feel like I'm going on and on and not making my point. My point is two-fold: independence from parents as chosen by the girl - and early development of the skills needed to calmly and safely navigate the medical paradigm to prevent and treat disease (manage her own care).
 

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OK, things are different over here......<br><br>
We see a nurse for a smear, Doctors for other problems in order to be referred to an Ob/Gyn if seen as necessary.<br><br>
When I went for contraception to my doctors, I was asked questions, it didn't require a physical exam except for my last contraceptive choice which is an IUD which required my specially trained GP to insert it, a nurse can check it later though. When I went for my first smear, my then GP did perform it but it has since been nurses or the Ob/Gyn at the same time as a colposcopy. These days however, I don't even need to see an Ob/Gyn for a colposcopy cos they have specially trained Gyn Nurses (just as well, I hate Ob/Gyns).<br><br>
For pregnancy, first time I went straight to the GP who organised a MW and then Ob/Gyn...... Second time, I went straight to the MW and completely avoided the GP and Ob/Gyn (woo hoo).<br><br>
I would never have felt comfortable seeing an Ob/Gyn as a teen, I was always much happier to see a GP who actually knew something about me and TBH, that is most definitely the right option for me, all Ob/Gyns that I have been treated by (except 2, 1 now retired the other one working elsewhere) have been real idiots, they don't know me, don't bother reading my notes and as a result have caused trauma (psychological and physical pain), not to mention having their heads stuck so far up their backsides that they never heard a word I said and to top it all off, so busy that everything they did was rushed.<br><br>
But thats just my opinion...... Maybe Ob/Gyns aren't getting enough work these days so trying to get in more patients??????
 
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