Mothering Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,014 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please!! We have the opportunity to adopt a 2 1/2 yr old male named Toby. We are going to meet him Sunday. Any info on this breed or advice? I hear they are high energy, what can I do/provide for the dog regarding this? I stay at home with my 2 youngest dc, we do own our own house and have a huge yard(alot of it is wooded now and we're built into a hill but for now there is room to play and we plan on landscaping starting this summer) I plan on daily walks (at least morning and afternoon- probably more come summer) but what else should I know to ensure he'll be happy here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,014 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
oh and he'll be an only dog and we do have an 11yr old female indoor cat (but she pretty much keeps to herself)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,578 Posts
Can you let him meet your children before you commit? Our JRT was very aggressive with my children (unprovoked). Other than that, he was a lovey dog, liked to cuddle, take long walks (he pulled), and loved to run in the yard. He caught balls 5 ft in the air and was very strong and acrobatic. HTH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,014 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh yes we're taking the kids with us on Sunday!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,418 Posts
I've never owned a JRT but I would only consider it if I could give almost constant exercise and intensive training. From all that I've read and heard about these dogs, if you don't give them tasks, tricks, new things to learn all the time, they will make up their own. You probably won't like what they decide to learn.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,346 Posts
Every one I've been around was like a dog on speed. Literally. The most active, determined, intense dogs I've ever seen. Totally cute and all. But still. IMO these dogs need a job. So be prepared to give it lots of exercise and training. I also wouldn't leave it home alone in the house loose. A bored one can really make a mess. Crate training is a must IMO.<br><br>
Oh and toys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,108 Posts
I have two jack russells, what would you like to know? Specifically?<br><br>
First of all, this breed, for a long time, has been a "type" breed. Meaning they were bred for a specific purpose, and different lines and generations are different "types" - bred for different things. They are primarily a go to ground breed, bred to hunt under ground - badgers, dogs, hares, etc. Some lines are bred to bay (hold an animal at bay), some are bed to kill, some are bred for pest control.<br><br>
Over the past 10 years they've split into two groups - long legged jacks (Jack Russells, Parson Russell Terriers) and short legged Jacks - Irish Jacks, English Jacks, and Russell Terriers.<br><br>
There is a lot of hype right now about getting all the Jacks into the AKC. Some are keen to have them recognized, some are speculative that the AKC will ruin the breed by making them all about looks and not about functionality. In short, the <a href="http://www.terrier.com/" target="_blank">JRTCA</a> Jack Russell, for all intents and purposes, is the Parson Russell Terrier, and the short legged Jack, which they hope to name the Russell Terrier, will be the "puddin" type. Those are the ones said to have been the English farm dogs kept that kept vermin population down, earning their "daily pudding", hence the name - Puddins.<br><br>
Some will tell you Puddins are a calmer dog, while the standards are a bit more prey driven, but I don't think so. Maybe to a certain degree, my two certainly do fall into that mold, but not all of them. My female is a JRTCA standard Jack, and my male is an EJRTCA (English/Irish lines, short legged).<br><br>
They NEED constant reliable exercise, and an outlet for their prey drive. There are several go to ground competitions to join, lure coursing is fun, and even fly ball. They can be GREAT family dogs, but don't take well to being bossed around, and are not typically the kind of dog that the kids can climb on and pull their ears. They do demand a certain level of respect for personal space, and because of this, they thrive on hands off positive reinforcement type training. The harder you push them physically, the harder they fight back. They are a tenacious breed and can be very challenging, but also very rewarding.<br><br>
If you are going to consider one in a house with kids, I would definitely do so on a trial basis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,108 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>amj'smommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10765517"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">but what else should I know to ensure he'll be happy here?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I'm back (DD's in bed so I have more time <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> ), but if at all possible, I would landscape your yard in two sections - dog side, and pretty garden side. I would never spend the money to landscape our yard, the dogs would just destroy it.<br><br>
I know several people who have used retaining wall structures to separate parts of the gardens, and as has been suggested for go to ground breeds before, building a designated digging area. They are known diggers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
I love the little buggers and have only met one that was awful with children. All of the ones I have met are very very active.<br>
I would be vary wary about having him around your cat. Jack's like to chase and tear things apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,108 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BunnySlippers</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10774732"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would be vary wary about having him around your cat. Jack's like to chase and tear things apart.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
The fallacy in this is that they don't typically tend to think of cats they <i>live</i> with as prey. They DO have a high prey drive, and if a strange cat ran through the back yard the chase would be on, but I have two cats who RUN this house and the dogs don't put a foot wrong in their presence. Of course, every dog is different, but many multiple jack homes have other small animals.<br><br><a href="http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd149/north_of_601/DSCN1229.jpg" target="_blank">http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/d...1/DSCN1229.jpg</a><br><br><a href="http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd149/north_of_601/IMG_0211.jpg" target="_blank">http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/d...1/IMG_0211.jpg</a><br><br>
(That last one is not a normal occurance around here - the dogs on the couch - but it was too cute not to take a picture of.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
<span style="font-family:'Comic Sans MS';"><span style="color:#008080;">Great pics North of 60!!</span></span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,642 Posts
I agree with that evaluation of prey drive--typically dogs with a lot of drive can be OK as long as nothing triggers it. So they'll be fine if the cat moves slowly and is in the same room. But if the same cat runs through the backyard fast, the dog will be right on it. Prey drive doesn't really distinguish between friend and not-friend; one of the Danes I bred killed a cat it had lived with its whole life and was very cuddly with, because the cat got out and ran through the dog pen (there were other management issues, so that's not the whole story, but the dog did NOT say "Oh, that's Garfield, I like him" and pull up. Running creature = prey).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
Dh's cousins' JRT licked all the varnish off of the bottom cupboards right down to the bare wood, licked all of the paint off of the walls from about knee height down and them started chewing holes in the drywall trying to catch beams of sunlight. He would pee on you or your stuff if he was mad at you. He was so high strung and neurotic... he would desperately try to escape the house and when he did he would chase cars barking at them, he got hit by 2 vans that I know of. He would not housetrain.<br><br>
Hated that dog... but their kids loved him. He was great with the kids...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,108 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>andrea</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10785635"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Dh's cousins' JRT licked all the varnish off of the bottom cupboards right down to the bare wood, licked all of the paint off of the walls from about knee height down and them started chewing holes in the drywall trying to catch beams of sunlight. He would pee on you or your stuff if he was mad at you. He was so high strung and neurotic... he would desperately try to escape the house and when he did he would chase cars barking at them, he got hit by 2 vans that I know of. He would not housetrain.<br><br>
Hated that dog... but their kids loved him. He was great with the kids...</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
All pretty common problems for the breed IF the dog is not sufficiently trained and exercised. My male would certainly end up like that if he didn't receive the amount of attention and activities that he gets. It happens very easily, unfortunately, which is why this breed is not suitable for many homes.<br><br>
An "active" home is not necessarily key with this breed. A lot of people like to say they have an active home, but the truth is, is that unless the dog actually has an outlet, and I don't just mean chasing the kids around the back yard (which is what a lot of people label as "active"), this kind of thing will happen.<br><br>
However, they are extremely intelligent dogs, which often leads to their own demise - they seek out ways to entertain and stimulate themselves if no one is going to engage them. Quite honestly, a jack russell tearing the wall apart thinking the light beam lives inside it doesn't surprise me at all. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I myself have two holes in my wall from Jersey as a pup (our house/dog sitter left her out of the crate while she ran home to feed her cats, she was only gone 15 minutes). I can only imagine what Jers thought was in the wall. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"><br><br>
Rhino can open cupboards. Jersey can climb like a cat. I've caught her standing on the railing of our deck. They're smart as whips. I have to smuggle treats into the house and hide them in various spots, otherwise they have the memory of elephants and will stake out that cupboard and not move until they get what they want. Jersey as a puppy used to play with a toy my daughter had that required pushing a red button to get the figures to "swim down the river". She'd push the button with her paw and just watch it, cocking her head. Both of them are bell trained to potty and get water. I keep a gate up on the laundry room so DD doesn't play in the water and when they're thirsty they ring a bell with their nose.<br><br>
I literally fear what they may get themselves into if I left them alone for any period of time. And relatively speaking, my two are fairly juvenile and are just starting to mellow out, at 3 and 4. I really think this breed is why crates and x-pends were invented, and I laugh when people claim they've never <i>had</i> to crate a dog before. If I didn't crate my two, I might come home to empty cupboards, Jersey on top of the refrigerator (where the treats currently are) or who knows what else.<br><br>
I absolutely would not own this breed if I was not a SAHM or did not have the means to hire a dog walker or send them to day care. If you would not turn your back on a curious toddler for a few hours at a time, then you know what I'm talking about. Death, injury, or destruction WILL occur. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,132 Posts
amj'smommy, have you had dogs before?<br><br>
If not, I would definitely steer away from this breed, or any terrier, for that matter. This sounds like it could be an extremely high-maintenance dog, and with two little kids in the house, you need them to be your first priority, not the dog.<br><br>
Don't let anyone guilt you into taking him home, just because he's so cute!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,014 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just wanted to update the situation and thank everyone for advise/concern..... we did end up taking him. I admit I was getting a bit nervous after reading alot of peoples take on them but he is such a good dog! Honestly the previous owners trained him well.... he is super good with the dc.... loves the baby.... I think he's a bit afraid of my cat though... he seems interested in her but steers clear when she's making her way through the room (you'ld have to know our cat to understand <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> ) We did have a cocker spaniel in the past when our first 2 dc were 4 and 2... not that it's the same but just to answer ?'s about previous dog ownership. We have an appt at our vet for a check up/ blood work for him next Monday and to set up an appt for him to be neutered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>North_Of_60</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10786628"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">An "active" home is not necessarily key with this breed. A lot of people like to say they have an active home, but the truth is, is that unless the dog actually has an outlet, and I don't just mean chasing the kids around the back yard (which is what a lot of people label as "active"), this kind of thing will happen.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Can you talk a bit about what would be a good outlet for them? I'm just curious. Is it possible for a family with a yard and SAHM and kids to give them what they need or do you think some more organized activity like agility or flyball is necessary? Or does it depend on the dog?<br><br>
We have a BC that absolutely needed a job when she was younger, and we did frisbee and lots of training games with her and long walks of course, but she's a herding breed and I wonder how terriers are different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,108 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kayjayjay</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10794636"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Can you talk a bit about what would be a good outlet for them? I'm just curious. Is it possible for a family with a yard and SAHM and kids to give them what they need or do you think some more organized activity like agility or flyball is necessary? Or does it depend on the dog?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
It definitely depends on the dog. But they are definitely working dogs, and with their combined instinct AND energy, a romp around the backyard is often times not enough - <i>mentally</i>.<br><br>
It's possible for a SAHM with kids to give them what they need, I do it, but I have to be creative about it. I can tell when they get board because they start sniffing in the corners and in the crack in the floors. The stick their noses behind the washing machine, in the closets, etc, looking for quarry.<br><br>
They key to finding an "outlet" is getting the dog to exhaust their instincts. Any dog can run around a back yard and get tired, but many dogs like to do what their instincts tell them to do - pointers like to point, retrievers like to retrieve, sight hounds like to chase, herders like to herd, and jack russells like to dig, flush, and bay.<br><br>
Diverting a dog's instincts with a specific task works well, like getting a Border Collie involved in agility. The goal is to keep them as mentally stimulated and challenged as they are physically stimulated and challenged. Some breeds can get away with less of a physical/mental balance, and other breeds require just as much mental stimulation, if not more, then physical. The Jack Russell (and its variants) falls into that category.<br><br>
Instead of actually taking a Jack Russell out into the field and hunting with them, there are plenty of scent games, tracking, lure coursing, and go to ground events that don't involve any harm to small animals. Even taking bones and toys and burying them in a designated dig area and letting them tear into the ground is good for them.<br><br>
I'll frequently take them out for walks into the bush, find an old log, and let them go to town on digging it up. They LOVE it, and the difference in their satisfaction after that kind of walk, as opposed to running around the back yard, is like night and day.<br><br>
Here's a good link on go to ground competitions:<br><br><a href="http://www.terrier.com/trial/gtg.php4" target="_blank">http://www.terrier.com/trial/gtg.php4</a><br><br>
Some info on Jack lure coursing:<br><br><a href="http://www.dirt-dog.com/lure_coursing/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.dirt-dog.com/lure_coursing/index.html</a>
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top