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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ds will be 6yo in January. He was PROFOUNDLY delayed as an infant, and with lots of work--he really does look like a pretty neurotypical 5yo. I mean, there are certainly issues but nothing screams "autism spectrum" at you except maybe his memory. OMG... the memory.<br><br>
His PDD-NOS dx was issued 2 years ago and Wednesday morning we are going to either reconfirm it or rule it out.<br><br>
I have no idea why I'm doing this. There are no school services to be concerned about. Of course, I say that and the reality is I don't know because I'm only relying on the district evals and nothing else. We homeschool and he is finishing up 49 hours of "owed" OT time. But otherwise, he tested out of SpEd. I could've argued with them about his auditory processing (he qualified with the same scores last year, but they're not really doing anything for him--so I'm not interested in continuing).<br><br>
I'm not sure why I'm doing this. Except that when they issued his dx, I know back then I felt like "oh... he's totally fine!" and when they were doing the testing I saw first-hand how not "fine" he was. In fact, about 2 months later we took in our first foster children and got a good dose of how "not fine" he was and how much we were living around his issues without even knowing it.<br><br>
So I guess maybe somewhere deep in my heart I'm questioning my ability to objectively see my son. On the other hand, I'm not sure the dx (or lack thereof) is going to make a difference.<br><br>
Hmmm... maybe watching the evaluations will highlight something that *I* need to be working on with him regardless of services...? Maybe that's what I'm looking for? I don't know. I know that the last time we went through this, I definitely saw things that I didn't see in our day-to-day.<br><br>
*sigh*<br><br>
Okay... I think I just have anxiety about putting him through any more testing than is absolutely necessary.<br><br>
Thanks for letting me think out loud... sorta.
 

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DS is 4. I am in the same place -- kinda -- i can't tell what is normal, what is his age, what is a SN ...and so on to the point of dizzy<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">So I guess maybe somewhere deep in my heart I'm questioning my ability to objectively see my son. On the other hand, I'm not sure the dx (or lack thereof) is going to make a difference.<br><br>
Hmmm... <b>maybe watching the evaluations will highlight something that *I* need to be working on with him regardless of services</b>...? Maybe that's what I'm looking for? I don't know. I know that the last time we went through this, I definitely saw things that I didn't see in our day-to-day.</td>
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We too plan to home school<br><br>
and we live in a rural area without many services to offer<br><br>
we continue working to find a good DX ...<br><br>
I want it to give me direction, i want it jsut because ...<br><br>
i do think it is good to see our children with others -- to get a differnt view of them. I also think the feed back from someone else is good too -- as you say "we start to accept normal" as we live it all the time -- it is good to hear from someone else (not the guy at the store) what they see.<br><br>
I have had it go both ways -- i have had the SW tell me "no that is normal at this age, relax" and other times say "no really most kids are not doing X at this point"<br><br>
I don't know about his testing at 6 -- but all the testing Theo has done, up to and at 4, has been fun to him. no anxiety for him. people he knows and yes Miss Em in speech pushes him a bit -- but it is all fun to him .... so i, personally, would not worry about the anxety of testing on him .<br><br>
Aimee
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
He just went through a HUGE battery of special ed testing in June. They start at the lowest levels and go until he maxes out. His memory makes it easy for him to blow out "recall" testing and that's what a lot of it is... so we often had to go end and go back to finish testing because it goes on and on and on. It's not fun to him, it's boring and he gets kind of annoyed/angry about it.<br><br>
Yeah--I have no clue what's normal. But then I'm not sure I care. We function. He's only been home for a year. School environments were a nightmare for us, but I wonder if they would be now. Regardless, we have a laundry list of reasons to homeschool outside of that.<br><br>
I think what's bugging me most is the intake interview and how the guy was already trying to suggest that ds might have Asperger's when I honest-to-God don't even know what I said that might make him think this. And really, maybe he IS gifted (the district insists and this guy notes that by his scores--he is)... wouldn't that be a factor in some of his behaviors.<br><br>
I think my anxiety is also partially that I simply don't think I trust these people. I'm not sure who I WOULD trust, but I don't like how it started.<br><br>
But maybe I'll glean something I'm not seeing. You're right: I have no concept of normal. It's even harder now that we're hsing because I find so many hs'd kids who are "not typical" in ways that ds is different because they are hs'd (not all of them of course, just enough to know that it's not just my kid... like being polite, or bright, or being able to talk to cashiers, etc.)<br><br>
Thanks...
 

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I think my anxiety is also partially that I simply don't think I trust these people. I'm not<br><br>
you do not trust their results?<br><br>
you do not turst their motives?<br><br>
You worry something os going to "happen" becasue of the testing?<br><br>
I am one who feels the more information we have the better, so i continue to seek out tests and assessments and information --<br><br>
but if you do not feel it will help your family -- maybe you should not do so
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>heatherdeg</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14714722"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So I guess maybe somewhere deep in my heart I'm questioning my ability to objectively see my son. On the other hand, I'm not sure the dx (or lack thereof) is going to make a difference.</div>
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You don't have to do the eval if you don't want to. I'm not sure that seeing another human being objectively is possible, it's always shaded. Most likely more so with our kids than with others.<br><br>
If you don't do it now, you can do it in a few years, or a decade. The results might be different then anyway. My DD has had different labels over the years. Some she has outgrown, some she hasn't. The only reason I can see for a label is if it makes communication easier with someone -- such as a teacher or therapist. Other than that, I don't really see the point. It doesn't make any difference in how we treat her, and it only sometimes helps in understanding her. She's quirky, we love her. That's pretty much all there is to know. The rest is just details.
 

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You sound torn enough about the decision that I'd probably wait until I felt more sure of whether it would be both helpful and worth it.<br><br>
I think I'm reading that a. you wonder if he's really on the spectrum rather than having another explanation for his quirky development (I get that)<br>
b. you think you might be missing something as he's seeming pretty typical to you (going back, I guess to a.)<br><br>
And I'm thinking what will you do differently based on what you find out? It sounds like nothing needs to change. I think knowing is what you want. And I'm not at all sure that will happen. If they tell you spectrum you're going to wonder about the objectivity (completely reasonable as they know he's coming in w/that dx. and that has to cloud thoughts). I suspect if they tell you not you'll still wonder because of the past stuff and/or when you see peer differences in the future. At any rate, I don't see the upside I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Momma Aimee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14716411"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">you do not trust their results?<br><br><b>Well, their results meaning that their interpretation of whatever testing shows... yeah. I have no history with this particular center to know how they "lean" if that makes any sense.</b><br><br>
you do not turst their motives?<br><br><b>I'm not really sure what kind of motive they'd have because it's not like they offer therapeutic services--so there's really nothing to gain from a dx or lack thereof. But back to the first answer--I don't know their culture.</b><br><br>
You worry something os going to "happen" becasue of the testing?<br><br><b>The more I think about it the more I think I set up the testing because I was worried about something that might NOT happen because I wasn't able to see a need in my son. I've missed some biggies in the past just from normalizing to things that would've been glaring to someone that didn't live with it.</b><br><br>
I am one who feels the more information we have the better, so i continue to seek out tests and assessments and information --<br><br>
but if you do not feel it will help your family -- maybe you should not do so</div>
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I don't think it will HURT my family. But I'm EXTREMELY sensitive to testing my son. I think I harbor a lot of guilt from when he was under such a microscope between the ages of 1-3yo. It wasn't right. To this day I don't know if it was necessary to get him where he is today or if it was just overkill.<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sbgrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14718645"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think I'm reading that a. you wonder if he's really on the spectrum rather than having another explanation for his quirky development (I get that)<br>
b. you think you might be missing something as he's seeming pretty typical to you (going back, I guess to a.)</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that"> both of those.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sbgrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14718645"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">And I'm thinking what will you do differently based on what you find out? It sounds like nothing needs to change. I think knowing is what you want. And I'm not at all sure that will happen. If they tell you spectrum you're going to wonder about the objectivity (completely reasonable as they know he's coming in w/that dx. and that has to cloud thoughts). I suspect if they tell you not you'll still wonder because of the past stuff and/or when you see peer differences in the future. At any rate, I don't see the upside I guess.</div>
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lmao because you almost completely get it. But really, if they tell me he's NOT in the spectrum, I'm seriously not going to question it. If they tell me he IS, I don't know what it would change. Maybe my expectations of him in places where we currently struggle and I'm treating him like a NT kid and possibly causing the resulting frustration levels because those things may need to be handled differently vs. the way I'm handling them.<br><br>
And either way, the testing will definitely be an opportunity for me to see him the way I did 2 years ago when it slapped me in the face what the issues were then--when I was also thinking he was totally fine.<br><br>
Thanks all. I'm going to go through it. I'll let you know how it goes. I so appreciate the responses.
 

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Okay, so we went. It was nothing like the prior evals. Nothing at all, actually. But in the end, it was good.<br><br>
We saw a developmental ped. She didn't administer any formal tests that would stress him out (like the ADOS, etc.). She looked him over physically and reviewed the history in more detail with me (what I gave at the parent intake appt. but she had questions, etc.). All of that took an hour.<br><br>
We talked a bit about his history and what I saw and didn't see. She said "let's cut right to the chase and go over the diagnostic criteria". So she pulled the sheet for ASDs and we went through them. He clearly didn't meet the criteria anymore. She was really good at prompting me for situations to be sure she was getting everything that mattered, but she didn't nit-pick and at one point she even acknowledged that his Lego fetish may actually BE appropriate to a NT 5yo who's just seriously into Legos. And since they don't impact his ability to function and socialize (they do, but only about 20% of the time)--when you factor this in with all the other missing qualifications, you could say he's just one of those 5yos. He still has horrible eye contact, but she noted that he DID occasionally provide it and that this was really just one of many things. She made sure to note which issues he was missing and acquired, were missing and he learned (meaning we had to train him to do--like the eye contact) and what he just always had. I found that to be interesting because I felt like she was really evaluating him vs. blowing everything off because of how he looks today or overreacting based on his history.<br><br>
She DID say that reviewing his history (copies of all the evals, etc. for the last 4-ish years) that it was amazing to see where he was today; but that it happens. That being said, ds falls into a very typical scenario where kids like him carry some residual issues. In his case, obvious auditory sensory/processing issues (which she says will be hard to really define until he's about 8yo) and very likely ADHD problems. We talked about ADHD at length and he is not dx'd with it at this point--but is meeting the criteria. She agreed that the auditory issues could be exacerbating what looks like ADHD symptoms; but that based on answers I gave to a questionnaire and her observation of him--there is definitely some kind of issue there that we should just keep in mind when trying to work with him.<br><br>
She was glad to see he had a school year of OT left and offered a prescription for additional OT since she did see lingering fine motor problems.<br><br>
She also wants me to watch more closely for his "sad"/depression issues and track them. She doesn't note it as a concern, but said that if I felt that strongly that it was a problem (and I AM really kind of worried about it) that I need to go back to a scenario of tracking stuff with him so that we can all really look at the data to see if it's following a pattern or if it's regularly connected to something... but that she didn't see anything of concern in person.<br><br>
She also addressed my concern about his recent battery of testing and the district insisting he was gifted. She agreed with me about the problem with relying on the testing that they administered because it was primarily recall, but she did note two subsections that were really good indicators--and that he DID score extremely high in those two areas. She said that a lot of his behavior things that I'm seeing could be related to the asynchronicity of children who are gifted (especially those gifted AND LD) and their inability to reconcile fitting into the world around them. It made sense. She asked if I had sought out help or support for his gifted traits and when I said I hadn't, she offered me some things to read.<br><br>
But otherwise, it was a good thing. He has a scrip for an audiogram and that's about it. I'm really glad I went. She wasn't alarmist nor was she too laid back. And the situations she saw interacting with him were really HIM and COULD have shown a different kind of kid. But he's not that kid anymore.<br><br>
Not to mention that she offered up a whole 'nother perspective on some of the things that I was concerned about (both about ds and about testing, etc.).<br><br>
*big sigh of relief*<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br><br>
Thanks all...
 

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That's great! I'm glad to hear how much he's improved. What a testament to all your efforts, huh? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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so glad to hear it went well, and that you feel solid about the outcome. it sounds like she really listened to you, and really gave this the attention it needed. good for you for going with your gut <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BookGoddess</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14722122"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">That's great! I'm glad to hear how much he's improved. What a testament to all your efforts, huh? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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You know, people say this a lot (especially those who know all we went through) and I'm sure that our efforts helped, but given where he is now I often wonder how MUCH it might've helped--ya know? I often wonder how much of what we did was wasted effort and he'd have turned out like this anyway. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"><br><br>
Then again, not really dice I would've rolled. I just feel funny when people credit where he is to our efforts when nobody will ever <i>really</i> know...
 

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Yay! Sounds like a very helpful appt. and that your assessment of where he is today was correct. I'm glad it went so well!<br><br>
I'm wondering--is your instinct that he was on the spectrum originally and he's moved to the point where he no longer meets the criteria or that he was mis-diagnosed at first because of the giftedness and all?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sbgrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14722875"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm wondering--is your instinct that he was on the spectrum originally and he's moved to the point where he no longer meets the criteria or that he was mis-diagnosed at first because of the giftedness and all?</div>
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IIIIIII... seriously don't know what to think. Initially (at 8mo) they thought he had cerebral palsy. As an infant, he was SEVERE. He didn't smile or make noise during his first year. He was severely delayed (in expressive communication, he rated at the level of a 3mo when he was 11mo). He had no clue you were there. I was a ebfing sahm and if I left to go to the store, there was no reaction when I returned. He NEVER looked at us--like in our faces--until he was almost 1yo (a week after removing an irritant food). In fact, dh & I remember the first time he was aware that we left the room (he was 15mo).<br><br>
Once he was able to speak (about 2yo) he didn't know to tell us when he needed something. There were nights when he would JUST. NOT. SLEEP. One night dh decided to get him a snack and *poof*... kid would sleep. He was hungry. Once he "got" that he needed to speak when he wanted something, he didn't "get" that someone needed to hear it. So he'd say what he wanted out loud to an empty room. He didn't point or wave. He never tugged on my shirt with "Mommy! Mommy! Mommy!".<br><br>
For two years we couldn't go anywhere without a particular item. First it was Thomas the Tank Engine--a specific one that he'd FLIP. OUT. if it had a paint chip... sometimes some tiny damage that dh & I would spend 10-15 minutes looking for before (and comparing it to another) before finding the "problem". We owned no less than 7 Thomas'--the exact same one--just in case. When he finally moved on to Lightning McQueen, it got slightly easier and the obsessiveness started to let up a little bit; but we had 4 of him (same one), too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"><br><br>
To this day, his eye contact (or rather, lack thereof is very noticeable). And when he's on an amusement park ride (yup--he can get on them!) he's more interested in how they work than the actual ride sometimes.<br><br>
I have a 1yo adoptive daughter right now (who has some mild issues of her own). So help me, if I'd have had her first--ds would've sent me running for help WAY earlier. There's a nearly 5-year age gap, but the infant he was clearly comes back to me in all the things she does that he didn't do. Sometimes things I didn't even realize were missing.<br><br>
So... was he misdiagnosed? Or did a combination of things rewire his brain in a way that there are just some remaining issues but he is no longer where he was? I don't think anyone will ever know...<br><br>
In addition to the food irritants, he has a mild immunodeficiency--found when I refused shots after the 6mo round AGAIN made him sick; and elevated lead levels (found around 8mo and quickly resolved). Add that to a high risk pg with 18+ u/s (literally) and severe pre-eclampsia. Ds was removed "semi-emergency" (they were trying to wait 40 hours for my own peri to do the c/s) due to lack of growth. Turned out my placenta was so calcified they needed assistance to remove it. But who knows what was getting through near the end.<br><br>
So add all of that up and then resolve all of them and then add supplements (fish oil, etc.) and therapies to catch up from the delays or teach that which didn't come naturally (like mimicking <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bigeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bigeyes"> which, btw, he never did "learn")... and you start to wonder if maybe the giftedness was a result of all THAT--ya know? I was a gifted child, so I don't really question it that way--but there are a LOT of people that do... and then accuse me of putting my son through holy hell over "nothing" and "it's no wonder he's so far ahead". <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked"><br><br>
I don't know. But looking back, there was a period of time where due to his age--he couldn't be dx'd with classic Kanner autism; but had he been the same way 2 years later--that's what it would've been. Dh & I were furniture. He would respond to the DOGS more than to us. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I blogged about him for Baby/ParentCenter from 15mo to almost 5yo... and am glad to have all of it captured (they've taken the blog down, but I have copies of my entries)
 

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Heather. I hope this doesn't come across differently than I intend but that is fascinating. Wow.<br>
I guess that can certainly show that you really can't predict outcomes from early issues.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>heatherdeg</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14723283"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">In addition to the food irritants, he has a mild immunodeficiency--found when I refused shots after the 6mo round AGAIN made him sick; and elevated lead levels (found around 8mo and quickly resolved). Add that to a high risk pg with 18+ u/s (literally) and severe pre-eclampsia. Ds was removed "semi-emergency" (they were trying to wait 40 hours for my own peri to do the c/s) due to lack of growth. Turned out my placenta was so calcified they needed assistance to remove it.</div>
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Just out of curiosity, did you do IVIG at a doctor's office or at home? What sorts of treatments did he have for the immunodeficiency? I have a friend who has a son on the spectrum and he has an immunodeficiency issue. He is seeing a DAN doctor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BookGoddess</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14726539"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Just out of curiosity, did you do IVIG at a doctor's office or at home? What sorts of treatments did he have for the immunodeficiency? I have a friend who has a son on the spectrum and he has an immunodeficiency issue. He is seeing a DAN doctor.</div>
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Mine had mild IgA deficiency that didn't require IVIG. He doesn't require IgA-depleted blood if he's hospitalized, either. It wasn't that severe, just strong enough where he's more prone to being sick (especially with respiratory illness--compounded by a history with lung collapse near birth and slight prematurity). True to form: when he's fighting off illness, it can be a multi-week affair--sometimes not resulting in a full-blown, out-for-the-count thing. But you know when kids are sick and therefore overtired and cranky? Yeah... that.<br><br>
So he had no formal/medical treatments for the deficiency. Because IgA affects linings and therefore the digestive tract (a major entry point for illness), they partially credit extended bfing to his ability to avoid a lot of hospital stays (since really, it's only really protecting the digestive tract vs. passing on immunities the way most people believe--shocking stuff). The other thing was that we were in a position to remove him from school or environments with other people when he started getting sick. His current ped said that this alone was HUGE because it kept him from having to be constantly fighting off new germs once his body was already engaged (and struggling) in fighting something off. If he was home, he wasn't under constant attack and therefore could rest and fight it off without taking on additional stress and wearing himself out (either through activities, playing, exposure to more illness or all of these combined) he'd have in school, etc. Of course, we REALLY pulled him because once he was getting sick, he was a behavior NIGHTMARE. Who knew? As a result, stopping the vaxes was also a huge factor.<br><br>
We also started supplementing him. We were hesitant to see a DAN! dr. because the rumors were that they were big on chelation (which scared us) and truly, we didn't have the money. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> But from Sept.-May we give him elderberry extract. Year-round he's on probiotics (and a recent study was published about their efficacy in flu avoidance in children), fish oil, vitamin D, vitamin C, plus a multivitamin (intermittently). We also keep Oscillo Kids, Spongia Tosta (he was the croup king and this was a dream cure) and Yin Chaio Jr. on-hand for when he starts getting sick (admittedly, we have never used the Yin Chaio Jr. on him yet).<br><br>
He's had one hospital stay in his little life. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy"> Multiple ER trips, but only one stay. And actually, no ER trips in almost 2 years.
 

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Interesting. DD nearly always gets a sinus or respiratory infection of some kind following a cold. Then she has to gon an abx to recover.<br>
What is Spongia Tosta? How do you give it - does it taste bad?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BookGoddess</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14727339"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Interesting. DD nearly always gets a sinus or respiratory infection of some kind following a cold. Then she has to gon an abx to recover.<br>
What is Spongia Tosta? How do you give it - does it taste bad?</div>
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Spongia Tosta is a homeopathic remedy for "croupy cough". We buy Boiron in a local pharmacy and since ds is now old enough to have something in his mouth without swallowing it immediately, life is much easier. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
You might also want to try out Sambucol. It's noted for it's attack of respiratory issues. When she get's sick initially, take the "crisis dosing" or whatever (it's 4x/day when ill) and hopefully you can avoid abx next time.<br><br>
I should note that although ds wasn't deficient enough to warrant IVIG, he does qualify for med exempt from the vaxes. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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Glad to hear it went well.<br><br>
Do you intend to pursue any particular plan or approach to dealing with the gifted concerns?<br><br>
Also, I'm wondering if you've tried anything to work on the eye contact problem. Is he aware it is a concern or that he's making less eye contact than would be considered typical?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Roar</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14728298"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Do you intend to pursue any particular plan or approach to dealing with the gifted concerns?</div>
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I honestly didn't consider it. I'm now starting to look more into it because I think that some of our behavior problems may be related. As I understand it, that's not uncommon. I know that often dh and I have to remind one another that "he's still only 5". He's homeschooled and so that part of it is good because no matter where he's at, he can go at his own pace.<br><br>
We're considering Davidson Young Scholars program just for guidance in that respect. He appears to qualify based on test scores. A friend also pointed me to an online site for behavior stuff for gifted children with free webinars. I have to go back and find the link. She was pretty convinced that he was gifted 9 months ago (her daughter is gifted) and urged me to look into it with him.<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Roar</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14728298"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Also, I'm wondering if you've tried anything to work on the eye contact problem. Is he aware it is a concern or that he's making less eye contact than would be considered typical?</div>
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He had ABA for the eye contact from 2-3yo. Nowadays, if he speaks to me, I tell him that I can't hear him because he's not looking at me or that nobody knows that he's listening to them because he's not looking at them. It doesn't seem to make a lot of difference... and part of that is just his attention span: he doesn't really WANT to be paying attention to talking to you--ya know? But his eye contact is NOTICEABLY bad. Like seriously--anyone, no matter what they think of him (gifted, LD, NT)--thinks it's a problem. He seriously almost never makes eye contact. At this point, it may just be a habit. But if that were the case, you'd think that 6months of constant reinforcement might have helped a bit. Notsomuch.
 
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