Mothering Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if anyone has any experience with testing positive for the anti-e antigen (and being RH positive). Apparently my bloodwork results came back indicating this and this probably means that I'm being risked out of midwifery care according to their guidelines. They are going to re-test and I've tried to do some research but it's rather confusing and I am not thinking too straight 10 minutes after the phone call.<br><br>
Anyone?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,292 Posts
I have no idea what that means. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> I hope everything is just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,510 Posts
I'm clueless, too. Sending lots of <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> s your way.<br><br>
I'm sure someone here will have an answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
If this is what I think it is.... it means your bloodtype is negative and your baby's is positive.<br><br>
My mom had this with both of her pregnancies. With me, her first, it was not a problem... because just like you can eat something for the first time or take meds, etc and not have an allergic respsonse, your body does the same with your first RH positive pregnancy. (I'm not sure if this holds true in ALL cases, but it was for her.)<br><br>
For her 2nd pregnancy, she had to simply get shots so that her body would not reject the baby (who was RH pos) as a parasite. She said it was no big deal. This would have been in 1980, so I'm not sure if procedures have changed any for RH pos. baby/RH neg mom from then until now.<br><br>
I don't see how that puts you at risk if all you need is a few shots. Do they work with any OB's? Maybe it's a matter of some more testing and getting you regulated, or working with an OB *and* a midwife.<br><br>
Best wishes!!!<br>
'Manda
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,510 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>pixiesmommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7971103"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If this is what I think it is.... it means your bloodtype is negative and your baby's is positive.<br><br>
My mom had this with both of her pregnancies. With me, her first, it was not a problem... because just like you can eat something for the first time or take meds, etc and not have an allergic respsonse, your body does the same with your first RH positive pregnancy. (I'm not sure if this holds true in ALL cases, but it was for her.)<br><br>
For her 2nd pregnancy, she had to simply get shots so that her body would not reject the baby (who was RH pos) as a parasite. She said it was no big deal. This would have been in 1980, so I'm not sure if procedures have changed any for RH pos. baby/RH neg mom from then until now.<br><br>
I don't see how that puts you at risk if all you need is a few shots. Do they work with any OB's? Maybe it's a matter of some more testing and getting you regulated, or working with an OB *and* a midwife.<br><br>
Best wishes!!!<br>
'Manda</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Hmmm. Actually, RH+ means that you won't need the Rhogam shot. My bloodtype is A+ and DH is A+ so I'm RH+ and don't need Rhogam. If one of us was a - bloodtype, then I would.<br><br>
I don't know what the anti-e antigen is, though. From what I've just briefly googled, I think it has something to do with hepatitis B transmission. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/confused.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Confused">:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,510 Posts
Here's a link: <a href="http://forums.obgyn.net/pregnancy-birth/P-B.0012/1526.html" target="_blank">http://forums.obgyn.net/pregnancy-bi...0012/1526.html</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,986 Posts
I might be able to help you out - both dh and I are in the med lab field, and dh oversees a large hospital blood bank now.<br><br>
Did they titer you to see how much anti e you do have? And, it may sound like an odd question, but are you white? Feel free to pm me if your uncomfortable with posting your race.<br><br>
(and is it a BIG E or a little e?)<br><br>
And, was your antibody screen pos? (assuming it is)<br><br>
Last minute thought...they NEED to phenotype your dh (for c,d,e).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
I've never heard of it before but I found this online:<br><br>
"What is Anti-E?<br>
The rhesus gene is made up of three components, C, D, and E. Clinically significant rhesus problems usually only occur with the D antigen. However, if you are E antigen negative, carrying a baby who is E antigen positive and you come into contact with the E antigen positive (either from a bleed in pregnancy, at delivery, or from a transfusion), then you may develop E antibodies. The concern is that there is a risk of these antibodies attacking the red blood cells of the baby. In fact, the risk of this occurring with E antibodies, even when they are present in large amounts, is very low. However, when antibodies are present, blood tests are usually done regularly to check on the levels present. If these levels are rising, the baby would be closely monitored to look for any signs of anaemia or haemolysis (destruction of blood cells). I cannot give you exact figures as regards the possible risks associated with the presence of E antibodies, but I do know that some obstetricians do not even monitor the levels of E antibodies because they do not believe that these pose any risk to the baby."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I might be able to help you out - both dh and I are in the med lab field, and dh oversees a large hospital blood bank now.<br><br>
Did they titer you to see how much anti e you do have? And, it may sound like an odd question, but are you white? Feel free to pm me if your uncomfortable with posting your race.<br><br>
(and is it a BIG E or a little e?)<br><br>
Last minute thought...are they going to type/screen your so?</td>
</tr></table></div>
Monocyte - thank you very much for your kind offer.<br><br>
My midwife didn't mention titers, although after I got off the phone with her and did a little bit of research myself, I wished I'd asked, although not knowing anything about it at the time and being totally unprepared for this kind of news, I guess I can't really expect that much of myself. I've left her a message asking her this.<br><br>
I am white, and I'm pretty sure it was little e, although again I didn't know there was a difference, so I've also asked her this in my message.<br><br>
They are going to retake blood at my next appt May 7th, and also SO's blood, so we'll see what comes of that. I'm trying hard to remain optimistic that I can at least have a MW at a hospital birth as a worst case scenario, rather than transferring care to an OB. Not that I have anything personal against OBs but I really like the idea that I will know the person at my birth, IYKWIM, either the MW or her partner.<br><br>
When I know more, I'll likely PM you, cause I think I'm missing a lot of info.<br><br>
Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for thinking of me!<br><br>
We had our appt with the MW yesterday and learned that I tested positive for Anti - Big E, but that there was not enough blood to get titers (8 vials of blood and not enough!). So they've taken blood from me and DH yesterday and are sending it off to the RH lab for retesting.<br><br>
Our MW also did a consult with one of the best OBs in the city on the phone while we were there regarding this. (He's very pro= home birth and horrified by the rate of caesarean births in North America, although apparently very brusque - but everything I've heard about him leads me to value his opinion.) The standard of care for MWs says they have to transfer care to an OB. However, he suggested that we carry on with our MW for now, just getting a lot of bloodwork done so that the titers can get checked. He said there was basically no risk to the baby, the problem was with me. So, we're going to wait for the new results, and probably get tested regularly from now on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,878 Posts
Edwina,<br><br>
Thanks for the update. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
Sounds like you have a great consultant! Hey, can he just come along for the homebirth!? I'm glad he's encouraging you to stick with your mw for now. It's great to have allopathic expertise when we need it!<br><br>
Please keep us posted. I hope that this all works out in the best possible way... Take gentle care of yourself, mama.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top