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Discussion Starter #1
I saw this infographic (and we all know how scientific those are :wink:) and was wondering if you guys have any additional information on this? I do hear the claim that as long as it bleeds and isn't deep that you'll be fine from tetanus pretty often.

 

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I honestly don't know. I've never worried about tetanus since we vaccinate for it. Maybe post it on the main boards and ask for proof it's incorrect.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I honestly don't know. I've never worried about tetanus since we vaccinate for it. Maybe post it on the main boards and ask for proof it's incorrect.
I did see this on the CDC:

"Clostridium tetani
C. tetani is a slender, gram-positive, anaerobic rod that may
develop a terminal spore, giving it a drumstick appearance.
The organism is sensitive to heat and cannot survive in
the presence of oxygen. The spores, in contrast, are very
resistant to heat and the usual antiseptics. They can survive
autoclaving at 249.8°F (121°C) for 10–15 minutes. The spores
are also relatively resistant to phenol and other chemical
agents.


http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/tetanus.pdf

And this:

"SUSCEPTIBILITY/RESISTANCE TO DISINFECTANTS: Spores are resistant to most disinfectants and, when susceptible, they require longer contact time Footnote 2, Footnote 8.

Clostridium spores are resistant to ethyl and propyl alcohols Footnote 8. Spores of clostridium species can be killed by high level disinfectants such as 2% aqueous glutaraldehyde within 3 hours, 8% formaldehyde, 20 ppm sodium hypochlorite Footnote 8, Footnote 9.

PHYSICAL INACTIVATION: Spores of the genus Clostridium are generally heat resistant but enterotoxin is heat labile and can be inactivated by dry heat treatment at 60oC for 5 minutes.

SURVIVAL OUTSIDE HOST: Spores can survive in soil for many years"

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/clostridium-tetani-eng.php

It does appear that it's a misconception that you can only get tetanus from a puncture wound. Tetanus spores can enter through minor scrapes and burns. I think some may have a false sense of security in thinking that as long as a wound bleeds and is cleaned that they don't need to worry about tetanus.

"The bacteria that cause tetanus can be found in soil, manure, or dust. They infect humans by entering the body through cuts or puncture wounds, particularly when the wound area is dirty. Animal bites, burns, and non-sterile injection of drugs can also lead to infection with Clostridium tetani. "

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=47225

Anyone else have any information?
 
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