Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,976 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/03/13/60minutes/main3936412.shtml?source=mostpop_story" target="_blank">http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/...=mostpop_story</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Quaid believes such mistakes occur too often. "They happen in every hospital in every state in this country and…I've come to find out, there's 100,000 people a year killed...in hospitals by medical mistakes," he tells Kroft. "It’s bigger than AIDS. It’s bigger than breast cancer. It’s bigger than automobile accidents and yet, no one seems to be really aware of the problem," says Quaid.</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,040 Posts
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> Good for him! That is just awful about his babies though <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> . I'm so glad that they survived!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
When my daughter had surgery on Feb 20th I questioned one of the medicines they were giving her. The nurse had the syringe and I said what is that? She said her Ditropan? I said why is it dark? (It looked brown to me in the syringe). She said why? Whats wrong? I said because ours at home is clear (my daughter takes it twice a day). She immediately paged the Pharmacy. Which after several people said, no its correct. But the other thing is it tasted different to my daughter. She didn't like the hospital Ditropan at all. So they called and verified with the Pharmacy again. They said, no its correct, just a different manufacturer.<br><br>
For us, I am very aware of what they are giving my child and why and what side effects (if I am not familar with it). But not all Parents/People do that. Or I believe in the case of the Quaids weren't with the kids when the Heparin was given.<br><br>
Speaking of Heparin, I gave my daughter this when she was a baby and was on antibiotics every 6 hours round the clock. Its anti clotting I do know that. I had to do SASH (Saline, Antiobitic, Saline and Heparin) into her PIC Line. Know one and I didn't question it, really said that it could be dangerous. But then maybe its more dangerous to a newborn rather than a 5 month old and maybe it was the amounts given the Quaid kids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,009 Posts
It's a shame that so many celebrities (and "regular" people, too) only get involved in a cause or raise awareness about a problem when it hits them or their family.<br><br>
It's sad, and I hope that measures are enacted to prevent such mistakes.<br><br>
KatWrangler-a SASH is much different than Heparin infusion/injection. With a SASH, there is just enough heparin mixed with the saline to prevent clots in the PICC line-the blood in the body isn't thinned. From what I can gather via the link, this is what his babies were supposed to have-just enough so the IV didn't clot. Instead they were given an IV push of heparin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,553 Posts
I'm so glad they survived in spite of the hospital's (pharma, etc) negligence. I hope Dennis's voice is heard loud and far.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CookieMonsterMommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10773290"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's a shame that so many celebrities (and "regular" people, too) only get involved in a cause or raise awareness about a problem when it hits them or their family.<br><br>
It's sad, and I hope that measures are enacted to prevent such mistakes.<br><br>
KatWrangler-a SASH is much different than Heparin infusion/injection. With a SASH, there is just enough heparin mixed with the saline to prevent clots in the PICC line-the blood in the body isn't thinned. From what I can gather via the link, this is what his babies were supposed to have-just enough so the IV didn't clot. Instead they were given an IV push of heparin</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
That makes sense! The syringes of Heparin I had were pre-made up. I was told to give her a particular dosage of it too (don't remember the amount now).<br><br>
I know my daughter had a problem with Valium when in recovery from this last surgery. Her blood pressure dropped twice for a couple of seconds each time. Then when we took her upstairs to her room, she wouldn't wake up eventhough her vitals were fine. Her nurse thought the Valiumin the IV line on top of having anethesia still in her system is what caused it. Scared the Sh*t out of us. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> It took her nurse a while to get her to move/flinch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,733 Posts
If this happened to the Average Person instead of Dennis Quaid, no one would know about it, and few would care. The babies were born of a surrogate, so I wonder about her recovery also in the same hospital.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,239 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CookieMonsterMommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10773290"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's a shame that so many celebrities (and "regular" people, too) only get involved in a cause or raise awareness about a problem when it hits them or their family.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
To be fair however, many people aren't aware of these problems until it hits their family.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,346 Posts
Right let's blame individuals. What about the medical establishment? They are the ones on the lines every day seeing the mistakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,009 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Arduinna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10774349"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Right let's blame individuals. What about the medical establishment? They are the ones on the lines every day seeing the mistakes.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I'm <a href="http:/what">sorry...who/what</a> was this directed at?<br><br>
Nurses report things like this to pharm all the time. Sometimes they change the packaging, sometimes they don't. There's also something called TALLMAN lettering, where similarly spelled (or phonetically sounding) meds are selectively capitolized to help differentiate. Such as hydrOXYzine and hydrALAzine.<br><br>
aniT, you're right. Especially about med errors...I guess they're not recognized as a problem by the public. And I am glad that this will rasie awareness and hopefully enact change. It just frustrates me that so many people only take off their blinders when they have to, yk?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,846 Posts
every time you or a loved one is in the hospital, ask what medicine and what dosage is being given every, single time. even if you don't know what it is, the fact that you're asking them can make them think twice or double check. even tylenol can be deadly- you have to be a constant, vigilant advocate. I've been through two surgeries with my DD and what I worried about more than anesthesia, more than surgery itself, recovery or even infection was this- mistakes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bri276</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10774445"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">every time you or a loved one is in the hospital, ask what medicine and what dosage is being given every, single time. even if you don't know what it is, the fact that you're asking them can make them think twice or double check. even tylenol can be deadly- you have to be a constant, vigilant advocate. I've been through two surgeries with my DD and what I worried about more than anesthesia, more than surgery itself, recovery or even infection was this- mistakes.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
Exactly, as I tried to point out in my post above. My daughter has had numerous medical procedures including 4 surgerys in the past year and a half. When she was scheduled for her very first surgery at 4 1/2 months old I got great advice from a Mom in a similar situation but was a Veteran at it. She said "You are your child's advocate. Do not hesitate to ask questions over and over again. Question everything!" So when she is in the hospital I ask "What is it? Why? What are the side effects? If its pain medicine, when is the next dosage? What happens if she can't wait till the next dosage?"<br><br>
If I am feeling out of it, I write it down. Cause its pretty darn easy to be out of it when your child is in the hospital. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,447 Posts
I keep wondering why they were using heparin in the first place?<br><br>
We haven't used it for keeping IV's patent for >5years. Unless they both had Broviacs or other tunnelled catheters, which i doubt...<br><br>
Hello Cedars, get with the program.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,009 Posts
Bug, do you work in Peds/NICU?<br><br>
We don't use it anymore either (all saline locks), but I believe the NICU does still. Not sure exactly why-maybe a venous access problem on the little ones?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BugMacGee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10774992"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I keep wondering why they were using heparin in the first place?<br><br>
We haven't used it for keeping IV's patent for >5years. Unless they both had Broviacs or other tunnelled catheters, which i doubt...<br><br>
Hello Cedars, get with the program.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Actually, I think it was the wrong drug all together. It was something similar name to Heparin. They gave the kids Heparin by mistake.<br><br>
Unless you are talking about the hospital even having Heparin available. We just used it July 2006 for my daughter and that was in Southern Cal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,009 Posts
From the article:
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The Quaid twins were mistakenly given the drug Heparin, an adult-strength blood thinner, instead of Hep-lock, a version of the drug a thousand times weaker that’s routinely used to clear IV lines in pediatric patients.</td>
</tr></table></div>
They were supposed to get what your daughter had, Kat, but were given regular, full strength heparin via IV push instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
It was about 1000x the prescribed dose, from what I remember on the news. They showed the two vials side by side and they were very similar. They use different colours to differentiate the doses, but the colours were very close in color (something like beige and pink?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,447 Posts
NICU. We've had no problem keeping saline locks patent with, yup, you guessed it, SALINE!<br><br>
We do use heparin in the IV fluids for PICC lines and Arterial lines. Never as a med unless baby is on ECMO or has a big thrombus somewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,526 Posts
The problem was in the strength, not the medication itself. It's a big problem as there are a number of different strengths of heparin - 1:100 and 1:1000 can make a big difference for a little guy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
611 Posts
What is most frustrating about this case is that in 2006 3 babies died at Methodist in Indianopolis from a similar issue. At the time, the manufacturer had committed to changing their packaging to prevent any further mixups, but they STILL haven't done it. Yes, there are things that hospitals can and should be doing to prevent this error, but the manufacturer knew there was an issue, and failed to address it. They should be accountable to the safety of their product, and preventing medication errors falls on their shoulders as well as the hospitals.<br><br>
The vials look almost identical. The only difference is the placement of the decimal point, and all the writing is in 8 point font. In some cases, the color strip on the label is different, but that is a small difference for most people to notice. Most NICUs are kept very dim, so it is incredibly hard to read in there. In the pharmacy, there is so much going on and they are going so fast, that small differences are easy to miss. You have to mistake proof the process and not really on humans to notice the small things. The best way to do that in this case is to change the packaging. /rant<br><br>
If you want to get really into this, read this blog, it's fascinating: <a href="http://runningahospital.blogspot.com/2007/11/safety-in-nicu.html" target="_blank">http://runningahospital.blogspot.com...y-in-nicu.html</a>
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top