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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noticed my son has had some trouble with reading (he excells in other subjects) And so I had the School test him. They said he is testing normal, ok really 3 points above where they would consider putting him in a special reading class, but they won't offer him extra help because he scored 3 point above. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:<br><br>
So I want to pull my kids from school. I figure if they aren't going to teach my kids right, then I will. There are other things that bug me, like the fact that they daily feed my children candy and junk food even after I repeatedly tell them not too. My daughter is being bullied. I have had enough!<br><br>
Now the problem, I don't know where to start. I like things about Waldorf, motesorri, and espesially like the Classical education. I have little to no money to buy curriculums. Where the heck do I start? I want to pull them from school next week. Is this jumping in to things too quickly? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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PULL THEM! There are tons of free resources on the web and at your local library. Unschool. Find out what they want to learn and help them learn all about it.<br><br>
Enjoy your kids!
 

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The first thing you should do is Google homeschool laws for your state. Then take it from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have already done quit a bit of research. We're in Idaho, so from what I gather I can pretty much do as I please. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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How old are your kids?<br><br>
I've heard lots about deschooling and so depending on their age or how stressed they are, they might need some down-time (even a week or something).<br><br>
I have to say that I've been pleasantly surprised at what I've found at my local library. Right now, we're borrowing, "More Mudpies to Magnets", which is a science experiment book. They also have lots of homeschooling help books. There is so much for free at the library and on the Internet.<br><br>
Depending on their ages, maybe you could sit down with them and ask them what their special interests are, like have them help you make a list of goals. For your son, with the reading, you can now give him whatever attention he needs and do lots of read-alouds for pleasure.<br><br>
I would also see if there's a homeschooling support group in your area. Not only would it normalize hs for your kids and help them connect with new friends, but it would give you the support you are looking for. I need to do hs park days more often. But when I do go, it's just such a breath of fresh air to talk to other Moms who hs. Many probably come from a bad public school exp , so you'd have commiseration. And the Moms I've met are just a wealth of information.<br><br>
From everything I've read and heard people talk about, I would say: try to avoid being too ambitious and doing too much in the beginning. Check out the laws. Find a group. And then, start with a modest list of goals, making sure to do lots of stuff/topics that your kids love. Read lots of fun books and enjoy your time together.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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I just wanna pipe in and say CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!
 

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congratulations on your decision... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/homeschool.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="homeschool">: <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/partytime.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="partytime"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> De-school yourself and your children. take this time to just chill, and relax and have fun. Discover fun ways to learn.<br><br>
take trips to the library, park ect and just discover that learning is not in a box <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbsup"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/banana.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="banana"><br><br>
Good for you!!
 

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Good for you Goddess. If it's not working, you change it, right?<br><br>
Left Field made some good points. But, the rule of thumb I've heard about time taken to deschool is one month for every year of school. Of course, it might be more, or less depending on your kids.<br><br>
So, if they've been in school for 6 years, think about a half a year to just get used to: free time, going outside whenever they want, going to the bathroom whenever they want, picking up a book whenever they want, etc. That is an adjustment.<br><br>
I would use some of that time to go on great fieldtrips with your kids. Make popcorn and watch a movie with them. Go for long walks in the woods. This can be a real strong connecting time which will certainly foster all of the "teaching" you will later do with a curriculum. Or...maybe you'll unschool. You will see your kids learning and see how they can get passionate about their interests. Support that.<br><br>
Good for you. Enjoy this new journey!<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I pulled out my kids last yr and I never look back. I would spend as much time deschooling. I think I needed it as much as they did. We unschool and really enjoy life as much as we can.<br>
Good luck to you <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Congratulations, Goddess!<br><br>
How old are your children? If you tell us, I'm sure posters can give you suggestions for great books to get from the library and free resources on the internet. There's so much stuff out there...you don't need to buy curriculum at all!
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> Congrats!<br><br>
If you like Charlotte Mason (I think a lot of people who like Classical also like CM), Ambleside Online has a free online curriculum. You have to find the books, but most are available at the library, and they have quite a few of them on line. They also have the Charlotte Mason series available online.<br><br>
And yes, I second deschooling.
 

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Five In a Row is a fantastic early elementary program -- not too structured (excellent for just after deschooling) if your kiddo/s are age 4 to 7. . . . We're getting the books from our public library, so it's cheap, too.
 

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<span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap"><br><br>
Yes - you can easily take them out right away without having plans for longterm methods or styles. For one thing, as has been mentioned in this thread already, it's really a necessity to decompress/deschool - but not just a few days or weeks. During that time you can all get back to a more normal life, and you can even take time to leisurely observe how they tend to learn things that come along. You definitely don't want to jump into a school-like kind of thing where you suddenly become a teacher in their home.<br><br>
You can begin setting up nurturing rituals like snuggling up on the couch and reading wonderful books to them in the morning, doing fall crafts, having lots of relaxed library time, going on nature walks with no goal other than soaking it all in, vegging, free playing, playing board and card games that are not necessarily "educational," but maybe also some fun games that actually do have educational value (like some of the ones listed toward the second half of this <a href="http://www.besthomeschooling.org/articles/lillian_jones_math.html" target="_blank">math article</a>, and yet more vegging and free playing... You'll eventually start to notice them getting more comfortable with themselves and getting back into their natural love of learning.<br><br>
You don't want to buy a curriculum right now - you have no way of knowing what kind of thing you'll eventually want. Meanwhile, when you do get around to adding some things into your day, there are lots and lots of lovely free resources online to get you by for a long time.<br>
Enjoy! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Lillian</span>
 

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I reccomend the book "Homeschool Your Child For Free" It is FULL of websites for all ages and subjects. It also includes the address/numbers for "Freebies" which are free magazines, pamphlets, news letters ect. It would give you a good idea of things that interest the children without putting any money out. I picked it up at the Barnes and Noble in Idaho Falls.
 

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I am clapping for you!!!! We ar on week no 7 and pulling my kids was the best decision I could have ever made! I still go head to head wiht DH at times but since I am a SAHM anyway they are issues he has to deal wiht, LOL
 

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I am not a homeschooler -- baby isn't born yet.<br><br>
But I am working with my sis to get her started<br><br>
for what it is worth here is what I would do:<br><br>
1. start supplmenting at home -- an hour a day -- 2 hours a day on weekends. while leaving them in school. this will let you "wade in" and might be less stressful and freaky to you. also let's you "play" around till you have a "system" you like.<br><br>
I would NOT pull them until you are ready, have an idea what you are going to do (even if it changes), and are more ready in a pratical sense to start. it will be more even keel for them to go from school to home school than to go from school, to just home, then to homeschool. Easier on mom too, I would think.<br><br>
2. Half Priced Books or Used book stores often have books you can use; either actual HS stuff or others. Look now -- start building up a libary and seeing where you want to go and how you want to get there.<br><br>
3. Join a local HS group. depending on where youare there are lots of them. These groups also -- once a year -- have big sales (a lot of the do) and you get get materials -- and talk to someone who has used it.<br><br>
4. Look for other community resources (does the art musum have a children's art seriese) stuff to expand and enrich homeschooling -- stuff the kids might not have gotton to do in school.<br><br>
I'd shot for the kids not retruning after Christmas vacation; or if that is too much too soon due to holidays, shoot for them not retruning after Spring Break with the real home schooling kicking in bewtween Jan 1 and Easter.<br><br>
Thoese are my thoughts.<br><br>
Aimee
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">Where the heck do I start? I want to pull them from school next week. Is this jumping in to things too quickly? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"></div>
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<span>I was writing hurriedly earlier, but I'll add some more on this. First, I want to assure you that lots and lots of others who've been in your shoes have found that it wasn't at all as difficult or complicated as they'd (quite understandably) assumed it was at the point you're in. Most wish they'd just gone ahead and pulled their kids out of school when they first wanted to rather than waiting - this is something that comes up again and again on homeschooling bulletin boards and email lists.<br><br>
While you're decompresssing/deschooling, you'll begin to notice - as you did when they were quite little - what sponges they are where learning is concerned. You'll discover that they can easily learn things associated with school without going through a fraction of the amount of lessons and "work" to do so.<br><br>
There are some wonderful books about homeschooling around these days - you can skim a good, annotated list on this web page: <a href="http://www.hsc.org/chaos/resources/general.php" target="_blank">books about homeschooling and learning</a> , and if you go a book site like Amazon.com, you can usually find lots more information about them. There's nothing at all special about the advice offered in books as compared to advice offered in person at homeschooling park days - except that there's a lot more of it and it's usually more thought out in terms of being organized and extensive. That means you have hours and hours worth of food for thought from a book, and you'll have a lot of things to think about. At park days, people would often rather talk about other things, because homeschooling is just one part of life.<br><br>
If you talk to homeschoolers who have been at it for a long time, or have grown homeschooled kids, you'll generally find more relaxed attitudes about what needs to be done to provide a great education. They've learned the hard way - from trial and error - how much easier it can be than the assumed it was before they'd begun or in the beginning. That's usually due to the simple fact that their kids, like all human beings, were natural learners.<br><br>
Don't be concerned about expenses. Most of us wasted a LOT of money on things we didn't need! The library system is a wonderful resource! So is the Internet! There are lots of free interactive educational sites - check out this one, for instance, that a lot of people here have loved:<br><a href="http://www.starfall.com/" target="_blank">Starfall</a><br><br>
There are loads of great free Internet resources within this large set of annotated links that I put together for a state homeschooling group I used to volunteer for, and later took over for my own noncommercial site when they didn't feel they had the time to keep it updated: <a href="http://www.besthomeschooling.org/gateway/intedws.html" target="_blank">homeschooling gateway</a>.<br><br>
So much is free. Just being out in nature during the hours that other kids are in school during three of four seasons is an amazing benefit in itself. Learning about the earth, weather, reasons for seasonal changes, bird migration, stars and planets, etc., can be done very cheaply with wonderful library and Internet references supplementing casual personal observation and conversation. Your kids will pick up all sorts of information about things their friends in school won't be exposed to. Helping cook some interesting meals and snacks can bring in reading and math experiences - you can even make soaps and craft materials together and learn from that.<br><br>
I could go on and on - and I hope others do - but the bottom line is that you can just jump right in. You could begin with a very flexible weekly calendar you plan together, so that you'll have some activities and supplies in mind so as not to feel overwhelmed:<br>
Monday - playtime before going to library, read to kids in afternoon (with time for them to read or peruse books they've picked out), cook together something special that you pick from a library book...<br>
Tuesday - read to kids, build with clay, play ______ card or _____board game, cook ____for lunch, go kids' science center at museum, ....<br><br>
You can do it! Keep us posted. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Lillian</span>
 
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