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A must read. Especially for any parent who has been duped into believing their child's cord blood is some kind of insurance policy.<br><br>
Please, everyone, give your newborns their blood. Not ten days or ten years from their birth, but at birth via your baby's cord. It's their only chance to receive what is rightfully theirs and it doesn't cost anyone a cent.<br><br><a href="http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2003/09/22/cordblood/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/200...ood/index.html</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The American Academy of Pediatrics, for one, released a statement in 1999 that cast a dubious light on the for-profit industry. Given the current technology (which does not support a particularly wide range of uses for cord blood), the academy wrote: "... private storage of cord blood as 'biological insurance' is unwise." The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' position, outlined in 1997, stated that although cord blood transplants "seem very encouraging," "until there is a fuller understanding of all of these issues, we must proceed with considerable circumspection. Parents should not be sold this service without a realistic assessment of their likely return on their investment."</td>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">"And it's extraordinarily rare that a cord blood transplant would occur in which a newborn's cord blood is given back to the same donor."<br><br>
This is because the very blood that was saved could be the same blood that caused the disease in the first place. "Most of the kids who need transplants that could involve the use of cord blood will have a genetic disease in which you couldn't use their own blood because the kids might just get the same disease [all over again]," explains Dr. Cladd Stevens, medical director of the cord blood program at the New York Blood Center, the largest public cord-blood storage center in the country. "Take an instance in which a child develops leukemia later in life. There is good evidence that these kids have the leukemic cell in their blood at birth."</td>
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How old is this article? I couldn't pull it up, but it looks like, from what you've got quoted, the most recent snip from the AAP is 4 years old and the ACOG one is 6. Is there anything more recent that can support these claims, and what is the position of these two organizations in 2003?
 

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My son was diagnosed with aplastic anemia(bone marrow failure) at the age of 15 mo. He is an only child, so did not have siblings that might have been a match for a transplant. We did not save his cord blood at birth, but I asked his doctor if it would have made a difference if we had. Although he did mention that it might not have worked because it could have been his own stem cells that were the problem in the first place, they still would have tried that option if it became his only option. Thank God the treatment that they used worked and his disease is now going into remission. I am currently 5 weeks pregnant with our second child, and there is no doubt that I will bank this babys cord blood. There is always a risk that our older son will relapse and need his siblings stem cells. I will also never take for granted that my children can get sick. There are no guarantees in life. So even if your child never gets a disease that would need cord blood, saving the cord blood isn't a waste. You might have future children that could use it, or you can always donate it to people who actually need it.<br><br><br>
Kristen<br>
mom to Aiden 01-01-02
 

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Or you could give it to your baby at birth, the way nature intended.
 

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How much blood do they take when they bank it?<br><br>
We don't plan to cut the cord until it stops pulsing and is limp, so that baby gets all the blood meant for it. (see <a href="http://www.cordclamping.com" target="_blank">www.cordclamping.com</a> I think) I wouldn't think the few drops left would be enough to save. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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I didn't find a difinitive answer on whether there would be any blood left after the cord has stopped pulsing / gone limp. I surmised, though that there would not be - I could be wrong, though.<br><br>
The other thing is that I hadn't planned on banking, but donating. I was unable to find a location to donate remotely to. You had to give birth in a facility that did the donations. There is a comprehensive list on the marrow donor site of hospitals that do donations.<br><br>
HTH
 

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My sons hematologist told me that they can actually take blood from the placenta. I don't know how accurate that information is, but it leads me to believe that there would be enough blood left over even after the cord has stopped pulsing. I don't know for sure though. Now I'm curious. Maybe at my son's next appt I'll ask him for a few more details.<br><br><br>
Kristen<br>
mom to Aiden 01-01-02
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> I agree with the OP.<br><br>
Cicerosum, perhaps there hasn't been an updated AAP newsrelease because the info <i>is still</i> accurate.<br><br>
I personally don't want to donate my babies cord blood for my own personal use (since it's an "empty" hope... it's highly unlikely that we can use it, if my baby has X disease, the blood will have it also.)<br><br>
But... this article talks about how PUBLIC BANKS (cord blood from strangers) have helped babies.<br><br><a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/10-13-2004/city_life/health/story/241454p-207093c.html" target="_blank">New York Daily News: A Most Precious Gift</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Public banks will tell you no, don't pay to store it privately. Your chances of ever using it are next to nil. Better donate to us — we might find a much-awaited match that could save a stranger's life.<br><br>
Doctors tend to side with public programs, unless someone in the family already has an illness that cord blood could cure. Even then, only one in four related recipients and donors are a good match.</td>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">It came from the New York Blood Center — home to the nation's leading public cord-blood bank. The center collects from labor and delivery units at five sites: Brooklyn Hospital, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, North Shore Long Island Jewish Hospital, Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia and University Hospitals of Cleveland.<br><br>
Since its inception in 1993, more than 26,000 mothers have donated their baby's cord blood, making transplants possible for 1,600 patients worldwide with about 65 medical conditions.</td>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bigeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bigeyes"> My question is, are women being told that they are donating their own cord blood in NYC? Or are hospitals just clamping the cord early (which is done all over the USA) and THEN just taking it and making money off of it?<br><br>
Anyway, I think it's a really good article.
 

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I wish I had thought of banking with Meg but I didn't and in the OR there wasn't time for messing around with that. She recieved 10 blood infusions in the first few months of her life. All from donor blood. It saved her life quite a few times but in her case, regardless of her genetic disorder her own blood would have been just as good but not better. Her body wouldn't kick onto making it's own hematocrit until getting a few doses of epigen. It's like that cancer drug procrit. It's also very very expensive to bank blood and we just couldn't have afforded it.
 

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We donated my dd's cord blood and had to sign a thick stack of consent forms, so I doubt that it's being done anywhere without the mother's knowledge.<br><br>
We plan on delaying cord clamping this time around, and were told that this means we cannot donate the cord blood.
 

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This cord blood banking thing is fast becoming one of my pet peeves. I see ads for it <i>everywhere</i>. It's in most of the pregnancy and parenting magazines, and it appears as spam in my e-mail. It drives me nuts because they do not ever mention that <i>your baby needs that blood at birth.</i> Your baby does not need for you to save it, so that "if" there is a need at some faraway time- the baby actually needs that blood at birth.<br><br>
That's why the placenta continues pumping the blood through the cord after birth: it's supposed to. The baby has a biological need for all of the blood. Clamping the cord before the cord has finished pulsing can cause serious problems for a newborn. What's "funny" (not) is that the problems are explained away as "normal" for newborns, like anemia. That would only be normal if doctors made a habit of clamping cords before the infant has received the proper amount of blood... oh, wait. They DO.<br><br>
There was a discussion in this forum about this a couple of months ago. I encourage all of you who are considering donating or banking the cord blood to read this article: <a href="http://www.mercola.com/2002/mar/20/clamp.htm" target="_blank">http://www.mercola.com/2002/mar/20/clamp.htm</a> It's really informative, and I can almost guarantee that you have never gotten this information before. Certainly not from a cord-blood banking company.
 

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I wanted to add the issue my daughter had was severe anemia but the thing is that with being so premature and in distress there was not time for them to let things happen naturally. They expected to have to intubate her immediatly and she was taken to the NICU within minutes of birth. So, for her the possibility of either getting that blood from her cord or banking it was not there. And I am so thankful to the people that donated that blood that saved her life!!!
 

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m~h~l, I know you've gone through so much with your daughter. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"> I totally agree about donated blood- from adults! It's a wonderful thing, and I wish everybody would do it. I have a friend from college who has donated gallons and gallons.<br><br>
ETA: Whoa, this is an old thread!!! I assumed it was new since we are assaulted by banking ads more and more every day... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll">
 

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It's pathetic that i've never donated blood myself. I've either been pregnant,post-c-section or something else since I can remember! I'm also really really scared to do it... but I will when I am able.<br><br>
Did you know that in other countries, Mexico is one I know for sure, when a person needs donated blood they will ask a family member to go and donate blood to fill the place of the prescreened blood to be used? This ensures that they always have an adequate supply of blood and also helps cut down on medical costs. It's a neat idea. My MIL has a nephew there who was very ill for a long time and to keep his mother from having to pay for the blood infusions the family took turnd giving blood in exchance. I wish the US would impliment this.
 

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I didn't know that! It really is a good idea. You know, that reminds me of something... though it's not common practice IRL in the US, it seems to be common practice on soap operas... that's how <b>(dramatic pause)</b> <i>somebody</i> always finds out that <i>so-and-so</i> is not really <i>what's-his-name's</i> biological father! What's-his-name gets hurt, so-and-so tries to donate blood, and finds out he's not compatible! :LOL
 

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lol~! That's WHY it's not common practive in the US. We're disfunctional enough! Seriously, that's the reason they wouldn't aloow my family (I couldn't after my surgery and DH had taken malarium) to donate. It would be too much to find out that ie my mother had aids or something like that.
 

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We have opted to allow the cord to stop pulsing then donating whatever is left to science much like I'd donate all my organs if I died. I would never want to store my baby's blood before he/she got it all. I don't think that the sOB who did my C/S allowed the cord to stop pulsing, and they took DS's placenta too even though I told everyone we wanted to keep it. I don't know what happend to all that last time. It sickens me.
 

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I just wanted to clarify that when I talk about my son having aplastic anemia, it has nothing at all to do with being "anemic" in the way we think of being anemic. Low hemaglobin caused by low iron. Aplastic anemia is bone marrow failure. The bone marrow stops making blood of any kind. White cells, red cells, platelets. It is life threatening, and the only cure for it is a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. If we had saved his cord blood they would have used it in a transplant. Aplastic anemia, in most cases is also believed to have been caused by something environmental. Something he was exposed to. Therefore his cord blood would not have been exposed to that same environmental toxin. It wasn't something his blood just had. It was his body's reaction to something invading his system. His body reacted incorrectly and fought off his own bone marrow. Therefore the cord blood(in his case) would have been fine(in theory). So Yes we saved his sisters cord blood when she was born nearly 5 months ago. It could very possibly save his life one day. And while yes there is only a 1 in 4 chance that it would be a perfect match, when you are dealing with people who will die without a transplant, they will do transplants with blood that is less than perfectly matched. It gives them a chance at a few more years of life. I am not at all saying that I think everyone should bank there baby's cord blood. I do believe that the cord should be allowed to stop pulsating on it's own, but the reality in this country is that most doctors and mothers don't allow that to happen anyway. I guess I'm just trying to say that while yes there is a big business going on, and they are playing into peoples fears, there is a reality in it as well. I want to believe that there is hope in stem cell research, and cures for many various diseases. I want to buy into the hype, because it is my life and my reality. Sorry if this was rambly and didn't make much sense. I don't post often because I'm always afraid this just come out wrong<br><br><br>
Kristen<br>
mom to Aiden 01-01-02<br>
and Regan 05-29-04
 

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I was just talking to a friend IRL about this. She banked her baby's cord blood after her homebirth, and after the cord stopped pulsing. She said there was plenty. I guess they don't charge you if there is not enough for a full collection. So to summarize, yes, it is possible to bank cord blood after the cord stops pulsing.
 

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they take the blood from the placenta and yes you can do it after it stops pulsing.<br><br>
the public banks are very expensive usually because of all of the testing of markers that have to be done.<br><br>
also, after working pediatric oncology i have learned that there is no known cause of pediatric cancer, so, there might be a good chance that you use your own stem cells and totally recover. i don't know. we did do stem cell transplants, they often used an identical twin, fraternal twin, or sibling. i know these are not the patient's cells, but i'm not sure how "stranger" you have to be for them to assume those cells won't change too.........................
 
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