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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you ever just feel there's *something* wrong with your child? I don't mean that they are getting sick but that they are perhaps delayed or just not right in some way?<br><br>
I had a really super laid back easy baby the first time around and dd is high needs so maybe some of this is just high needs?<br><br>
I don't know. I can't shake the feeling there is something wrong with dd. Like long-term wrong with her and my instincts have always been spot-on with her from the time she was conceived.<br><br>
It's lots of little things and many things I can't really say...I guess it's just something you would have to experience, kwim?<br><br>
The short list though is that she's got tons of food allergies. I know lots of kids these days have food allergies but it seems pretty extreme to me to have so many to so many basic foods. She's small, perhaps relating to the food allergy issue, but she's fallen off her growth curve entirely although she is healthy looking and even has chubby thighs.<br><br>
Everything with her is an extreme. I think that's the biggest thing that makes me feel she just isn't quite "right." If she's happy she is laughing but otherwise she is probably crying and screaming. She cries way more than any other 11 mos old I have ever known. She is OBSESSED with me. And again, I know that's normal, but it seems to an extreme and it's been this way for the past 9 mos so it's not just one little phase. I still can't go to the bathroom without her freaking out. And then she'll cry even when I come out and it could last 20 minutes or more. She won't go to anyone else...she'll sometimes go to dh but not usually. And in the beginning she was actually more bonded to him than to me. If something happens that makes her cry, like my ds taking a toy from her, she will cry forever. It can't be stopped by giving her back the toy, giving her a new toy, a "forbidden" item like a cell phone, or with any sort of distraction. This morning she crawled to me and wanted up. I picked her up and she immediately started throwing a fit: arching her back, screaming/crying, pushing against me, and trying to get down. So I set her down and she freaked out even more, throwing her body around. I tried picking her up and it's even more crying. Dh tried to help but she kept pushing him away. Finally I just let her lay there and cry. I didn't know what else to do, it lasted about 20 mins. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Oh and she bangs her head on stuff all the time. Yesterday I was sitting next to her crib trying to get her to take a nap. She was happy. She was laughing because she was trying to stick her foot out and touch me. So she was not upset at all and then she started banging her head on the crib. She just kept going harder and harder. She has a bruise today from it! She never cried from it....just kept babbling happily as she did it. Isn't that weird? It just doesn't seem right.<br><br>
She's also a dare devil. She's always covered in bumps and bruises because she will just throw herself off of furniture and such. She climbs everything. She LOVES being thrown around. The faster the better. I have to push her faster on the swing than I do my 4 yr old for her to really enjoy it.<br><br>
And most of all I feel this all started when she was about 11 weeks old. I feel like up until that point she was high needs but pretty normal. She was growing well. She was sleeping well. And then it's like suddenly everything changed. She stopped sleeping. She went from sleeping 10 hrs straight to not going longer than 90 mins. I know babies regress in sleeping habits but she still hasn't gotten better. I'm starting to have black outs and extreme vertigo from the lack of sleep. She won't co-sleep, it keeps her awake so I have to get up all night long.
 

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Oh, momma, that sounds hard. I have no personal experience, but your dd sounds like a sensory seeker to me. You should try x-posting in Special Needs.<br><br>
-e
 

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First I want to say that I am sorry for what you are going through. I am a special education teacher and you can PM me anytime if you need support. I agree with previous posting. I think this thread should be posted in special needs. I think you will find more parents who can offer better advice/support than here.<br>
It does sound like there are some sensory needs. If you are able to consult with an occupational therapist, I think they could offer some suggestions. I would also suggest a parent support group at local church, community center, or local education agency. It is helpful to know that other parents experience these same frustrations and may be able to offer support or advice.<br>
Thinking...if it is a sensory issue...have you tried baby massage? Again, I don't know-just throwing it out there.<br>
If you need someone to talk to --feel free to contact me. The best thing is to talk to others. It will prove helpful to your mental well being.<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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I don't know anything about special needs, so I am no good for advice on that. However, I have plenty of experience with allergies. This is probably a long shot, but you should research NAET (Nambudripad Allergy Elimination technique). I really believe in it and it can really change lives. Something NAET talks about is how allergies can manifest with emotional and physical symptoms. Some foods will cause obvious physical allergies, like hives, congestion, upset stomach etc....other foods can cause emotional or behavioral problems. If your daughter is a highly sensitive creature, she may be emotionally allergic to many foods that you might not even be aware of. NAET is based on chinese medicine, and the treatment uses muscle testing to figure what the body is allergic to and then it is works to eliminate the allergy. I really think you should look it up and see if you are interested. If you have no one in your area who practices NAET I think it would be worth traveling just to get the treatment.
 

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Shelsi,<br><br>
I see a fair number of similarities between your second child and my second child. For us, it is a health problem, the root cause is the mercury in my amalgam fillings. My first child got better genes (my husband's) and so although she got a lot of mercury from me, it's a much more subtle problem for her. This sounded weird, totally out of my reality, a year ago, but my son no longer bangs his head on the wall and his food intolerances are almost gone. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> And I've spent a lot of time reading and realizing that this is very treatable. But I found it scary and overwhelming at first (that's probably the understatement of my life).<br><br>
I think you would find a lot of interesting things in a book I recently read:<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FHealing-New-Childhood-Epidemics-Groundbreaking%2Fdp%2F0345494512%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1214787795%26sr%3D1-1" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Healing-New-Ch...4787795&sr=1-1</a><br><br>
He links _exactly_ the things you are talking about, behavior and allergies and neurological stuff like head-banging. He discusses multiple interrelated causes (he barely touches on dental amalgams, which is our issue, but these things have a lot of overlap in how they affect us and in how they are treated). Do you remember anything that happened around 11 weeks? Antibiotics for either of you, vaccines, dental work, a move?<br><br>
My son's food intolerances are more minor--rashes from cashews and chocolate, he vomited when he got ice cream for the first time (we did not consume straight milk because I'd seen years ago that it didn't agree with me), and we need to eat gfcf. GFCF plus supplements was what stopped my son's head-banging--it came back for a few hours when we got gluten, even trace amounts, but even that is getting better lately.<br><br>
If you think a heavy metal problem could be involved, beyond buying Bock's book (which does discuss other stuff beyond heavy metals, I don't want to give the wrong impression), is a hair test (if just one, I'd say for you, but two would show if there's any appreciable difference between you and your daughter). It has to be a specific test from a specific company--the interpretation doesn't look for mercury, it looks for minerals (calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iodine, like that) that are scattered in weird patterns, because that's what mercury does, it impairs the body's ability to use minerals appropriately. And you can see other heavy (and light) metals as well--understanding them is much more straightforward.<br><br>
Here's the link with all the details:<br><a href="http://home.earthlink.net/~moriam/HOW_TO_hair_test.html" target="_blank">http://home.earthlink.net/~moriam/HOW_TO_hair_test.html</a><br><br>
If you order by calling, you can mention the autism-mercury yahoo group and you'll get a discount. And if you want to post your results to the A-M yahoo group, you can get help interpreting them--they're pretty good with other metal problem too, not just mercury.<br><br>
Good luck figuring out your situation. Feel free to PM if you want more details (or just ask here too).
 

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11 months old? I think it's way too early to be pinning labels on a child who is exhibiting some age and developmentally appropriate reactions---separation anxiety and the like. I always say 9-10 months is my 'favorite' age and 12-18 months---well not so charming.<br><br>
Honestly with all three of mine, sleep fell apart coming up on 4 months. Not that uncommon. If she has a lot of food sensitivities, it may be causing her reflux which can cause a LOT of nightwaking. There are allopathic means to address that or dietary ones.<br><br>
Whoa, slow down, take a breath. She may just be an intense kid. DD2 is the exact opposite of DD1 and craves sensory input---which is why you may see yours climbing and doing daredevilish things. Oh and head banging.
 

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I agree that she seems sensory seeking. I just picked up the book "the out of sync child" and I suggest checking it out. Maybe it fits your situation, maybe not, but worth a try!
 

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She sounds a lot like my second child, who is very intense, and has sensory issues, but is still on this side of "typical". (although if you haven't had a special needs child, it looks a lot more intense than "typical"). She has been watched by ds' ST and OTs and, while they agree she is a handful, they assure me that she isn't likely to qualify for a diagnosis. Normal is a wide range.<br><br>
That said, we have found she is does a lot better when we do a lot of the same OT things that we do with my son...providing lots of opportunities for sensory exploration. Lots of opportunities for deep pressure and heavy work. (both help her find safe outlets for the behaviors like head banging, daredevil stunts and running into things on purpose). Set up a crash pad for her to fly into, wrap her tightly in blankets or sandwich her between cushions/bean bag chairs/tight hugs (in a playful way and make SURE you don't cover her head...this should be fun, not frightening) Have things like milk jugs, laundry detergent, buckets of heavy things for her to haul around, or have her move furniture or things heavy for her. Get her a wagon to haul things around. A mini trampoline has been a major life saver around here too.<br><br>
If she is under 3, you can always get an evaluation through EI. It doesn't hurt anything. Sensory issues, unlike a lot of speech issues, are usually not as problematic in later life because as we age, we learn more seamless coping mechanisms... things like chewing gum, controlling what clothes/shoes we wear, chosing a career that can suite your sensory needs.<br><br>
On the sleeping thing...sounds totally normal to me. Again, sounds like my typically developing child. My autistic kiddo never slept more than 3 hours at a time, and then was up between 24-48 hours (with the occasional 72 hour thrown in there for fun) before the next 3-4 hour crash and awake cycle. He stayed that way until 4-5, and now at 6 sleeps a glorious 8 hours a night. Waking up a few times a night as an infant/toddler/early preschooler is not a sleep problem, it is normal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
yeah that's the thing. It's like most of the things she does, the sleep issues and the separation anxiety for example, ARE normal for her age and I totally get this. Which is why over-all it's just this gut feeling that something isn't quite right. When it's all added up, when you spend time with her all day, you start to get that feeling but it's nothing that can really be listed, kwim?<br><br>
I'm far from the worrying type when it comes to my kids. My ds was really slow to do lots of things but I just knew he was fine and that he would do things at his own pace. Sure enough, at 4 yrs old, he has mostly caught up with his peers. I think he just learns differently than the average kid and so instead of gradually getting a handle on things he just observes for a really long time and then just does it. I mean he went from babbling one day to speaking sentences the next. Same with potty training: I didn't have to do anything, he just one day told me he didn't want diapers anymore and went and peed on the potty.<br><br>
I feel like I have really strong and sound instincts when it comes to my kids. I wish they were that good about my own life! LOL. So like I said, it's just this over all nagging feeling that something isn't quite right. I'm not saying that it's potentially a life long thing, or maybe it is, I don't know. But I do feel like it is something that will affect her for quite awhile. Ugh, this is all so intangible.<br><br>
I've gotten great ideas and resources from this thread and from the same thing I posted in the SN forum! Thanks everyone. I've got lots of reading to do! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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I say trust your gut. If you feel strongly something is wrong, it probably is. Yres, some of teh things youve said *can* be normal, but as you have described, it sounds liek your kid takes them to extremes and/or beyond a "normal" level..and some things - like headbanging to bruises without crying -is not normal.<br>
I'm going to second a pp...is there ANYthing that chamged at 11 weeks? Anything in your diet, environment, - it could be medication, vitamins, soap, fabric, foods, anything....anything at all?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bobandjess99</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11584696"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I say trust your gut. If you feel strongly something is wrong, it probably is. Yres, some of teh things youve said *can* be normal, but as you have described, it sounds liek your kid takes them to extremes and/or beyond a "normal" level..and some things - like headbanging to bruises without crying -is not normal.<br>
I'm going to second a pp...is there ANYthing that chamged at 11 weeks? Anything in your diet, environment, - it could be medication, vitamins, soap, fabric, foods, anything....anything at all?</div>
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Yes, I know it was 11 weeks because it was the week that me and the kids went and visited my parents. Now I will say that before that she was high needs and she was definitely reacting to foods (although I hadn't caught onto that yet). But it changed dramatically when we took that vacation. That vacation was weird. We flew there, everything was normal with the flight. I felt some slight vertigo that day but I figured between the flight and the stress of flying with 2 kids alone (and their car seats!) that it was no big deal. Several days later I was dizzy that morning but it subsided quickly. That evening I went to bed and the whole room started spinning out of control. I tried to wake my then 3 yr old up to "go get grandma" but that kid can't be woken for anything so I ended up crawling across the hallway to my mom's room. I figured I was just getting some nasty virus. Everything was spinning and I was started to feel nauseous. So I laid down. Then my foot started involuntarily shaking, then my leg, my arms and my whole body. I was totally aware but it was like a convulsion. My parents had to call 911 and I went to the ER. I didn't have any pumped milk with me so my dad had to run out and buy formula and bottles for dd (and he was so sweet, he bought like every brand of formula and bottle there was lol). I was only at the ER for about 4 hours, they never found anything wrong with me and by the time I got there I was fine, and my mom said dd only woke once and drank about 2 oz and went right back to sleep. So it didn't appear to be a trauma for her in any way. At the same time I always think back to that weird week has the "beginning" of all this. Although that is also the week that I had a light bulb moment and figured out she was allergic to corn.<br><br>
She was basically normal that week except she was waking up every 90 mins or so. I figured that was normal since we were travelling and she was sleeping next to me instead of being in her amby bed that she was used to. Also she rolled over for the first time both ways that week and of course that causes sleep issues as well sometimes. Other than that I can't put my finger on any one thing.<br><br>
Maybe if it a food intolerance issue that 2 oz of formula could have sent her little body over the edge? She is definitely allergic/intolerant to dairy. She appears to react the strongest to eggs and dairy when I try them in my own diet and of course the formula was just your basic similac so it was totally dairy based....
 

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Formula was implicated in Isaac's first crisis- he had a few ounces of formula (long story), a dose of DTP and ended up in hospital with septicaemia. He isn't diagnosed with anything, and we've stopped looking. I'm just accepting that he is who he is- which is extremely hard work to parent, but with some high points too.
 

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I'm really not sure what value it is to find something 'wrong' with her of the nature that you're looking for. Two ounces of formula?? When things go wrong with babies, they go really wrong. You wouldn't be grasping for straws if it was something concrete.<br><br>
Honestly, she sounds like a normal, intense, sensory-seeking 11 month old.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>heatherfeather</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11585357"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm really not sure what value it is to find something 'wrong' with her of the nature that you're looking for. Two ounces of formula?? When things go wrong with babies, they go really wrong. You wouldn't be grasping for straws if it was something concrete.<br><br>
Honestly, she sounds like a normal, intense, sensory-seeking 11 month old.</div>
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Bless you for being the voice of reason here. My God. We're jumping straight to talking about chelating <i>an 11 month old</i>???!!?? You have got to be kidding me.<br><br>
OP, if you're worried, get an evaluation. I also recommend reading Dr. Sears' "Fussy Baby Book."<br><br>
Please, before you read up on some of these other things like mercury poisoning, et al, consider that she may just have a high needs temperament. I say this as an autism mom who has a child who wrote the book on being high needs.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"> I know it's hard. I do. Dr. Sears' book really helped me.
 

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I don't know if it helps, but I have a 9 yr old night owl who never slept more than 60-90 minutes as an infant (and only in my arms or in the car) and is a perfectly wonderful child. Never wanted to be away from as a little one-- bacially would only let her father, sibs or my sister mess with her, and only when she got older. She still mostly ends up in my arms at some point in the middle of the night. Literally-- she wraps her legs around mine and puts her head in my armpit. She also goes to camp, swimming lessons, sailing lessons etc. She never got forumula, has never been vax'd, I have one cavity that was whirrled away (when I was 12), and she has never had an antbx in her life.<br><br>
Some children are more physically needy, but that doesn't mean there is anything 'wrong'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>heatherfeather</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11585357"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm really not sure what value it is to find something 'wrong' with her of the nature that you're looking for. Two ounces of formula?? When things go wrong with babies, they go really wrong. You wouldn't be grasping for straws if it was something concrete.<br><br>
Honestly, she sounds like a normal, intense, sensory-seeking 11 month old.</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Finch</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11585474"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Bless you for being the voice of reason here. My God. We're jumping straight to talking about chelating <i>an 11 month old</i>???!!?? You have got to be kidding me.<br><br>
OP, if you're worried, get an evaluation. I also recommend reading Dr. Sears' "Fussy Baby Book."<br><br>
Please, before you read up on some of these other things like mercury poisoning, et al, consider that she may just have a high needs temperament. I say this as an autism mom who has a child who wrote the book on being high needs.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"> I know it's hard. I do. Dr. Sears' book really helped me.</div>
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Well that's why I said this in my OP:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I had a really super laid back easy baby the first time around and dd is high needs so maybe some of this is just high needs?</td>
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Just because I mention that I feel something is wrong with her doesn't mean I think she has autism or mercury poisoning or whatever. It just means I feel something is off about her in some way and I'm trying to pinpoint it for my own sanity. I am a person who stresses easily when I can't read and research about something going on. I like to know everything about everything because it keeps me calm. No, of course you can't do that with your entire life, or your kids' lives for that matter, but what I can read up on I do for my own sense of internal peace. So trust me I know all about high needs. I've read all the books, all the Dr Sears books, etc. When she was 3,4,5 mos old I took great comfort in them.<br><br>
But besides the general nagging feeling there are physical factors that can not be ignored. Like the fact that she started off in the 90th percentile for height and weight and now she is so far down she is not even on the chart. The fact that she has never had a normal bf poo, not even close to normal. And even when I was only eating 5 foods for over 6 weeks she never reached a baseline although most of her worst symptoms did disappear. So she HAS something going on. Whether it's all related to her allergies or not I don't know and of course I intend to find out and get to the root of. She's not growing and that certainly is not normal.<br><br>
Am I going to go out and chelate my kid because of what someone on the internet said? Heck no. But I'm also not going to dismiss them because, quite frankly, it's rude to dismiss someone's experience. It's not hard for me to google "mercury poisoning symptoms" for a quick run down and see if it's anything I want to look at further. Same with some of the specific GI issues someone brought up (may have been on my other thread I don't remember). I appreciate having ideas from people with different experiences and certainly ideas that the so-called typical medical doctor may not think of.<br><br>
Quite honestly I find it surprising that moms here on MDC of all places would dismiss a mother's intuition/instinct when that is all we ever seem to talk about on other forums like the UC forum.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Shelsi</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11586237"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Quite honestly I find it surprising that moms here on MDC of all places would dismiss a mother's intuition/instinct when that is all we ever seem to talk about on other forums like the UC forum.</div>
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I did not dismiss them. I specifically said that if you feel there is something wrong, get an evaluation.<br><br>
I also wanted to quell the tone of mercury/autism/developmental boogeyman of the week hysteria that the thread was quickly taking on, and not necessarily from your OP, either.<br><br>
I am a big believer in gut feelings as well, I strongly encourage moms to honor them. They are there for a reason. I am concerned about the immediate jump some are taking to finding a "cause" for your dd's behavior, when there may not be a "cause" at all, simply her temperament.<br><br>
Hence my reply.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>TanyaLopez</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11583071"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Shelsi,<br><br>
If you think a heavy metal problem could be involved, beyond buying Bock's book (which does discuss other stuff beyond heavy metals, I don't want to give the wrong impression), is a hair test (if just one, I'd say for you, but two would show if there's any appreciable difference between you and your daughter). It has to be a specific test from a specific company--the interpretation doesn't look for mercury, it looks for minerals (calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iodine, like that) that are scattered in weird patterns, because that's what mercury does, it impairs the body's ability to use minerals appropriately. And you can see other heavy (and light) metals as well--understanding them is much more straightforward.<br></div>
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This answer scares me! Here's why:<br><a href="http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/hair.html" target="_blank">http://www.quackwatch.com/01Quackery...pics/hair.html</a>
 

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Rachel, (hi! I've missed you! Where are you living now??? Is your DH still overseas??)<br><br>
I would be worried too. That massive drop off of her personal curve is a concern. Is she hitting her milestones?<br><br>
Sure, it could be her temperament that makes her so fussy. But it *could* also be discomfort or pain. And that possibility - especially when your mama instincts are making noise - makes the pursuit of a "label" worth consideration.<br><br>
I have a high needs kid (now a hyper-intelligent 11 year old) and she was HARD as an infant and toddler, but my gut instinct never waved a red flag at me. I also have a ADHD inattentive 12 year old (dx at age 7) and she was such an EASY babe/toddler, but wow did I ever KNOW when things were not right for her.<br><br>
So I understand how it feels when your gut is telling you that something just ain't right. And I also understand how difficult it is to articulate that feeling.<br><br>
:bighug:
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>luckydog</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11586930"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Rachel, (hi! I've missed you! Where are you living now??? Is your DH still overseas??)<br><br>
I would be worried too. That massive drop off of her personal curve is a concern. Is she hitting her milestones?<br><br>
Sure, it could be her temperament that makes her so fussy. But it *could* also be discomfort or pain. And that possibility - especially when your mama instincts are making noise - makes the pursuit of a "label" worth consideration.<br><br>
I have a high needs kid (now a hyper-intelligent 11 year old) and she was HARD as an infant and toddler, but my gut instinct never waved a red flag at me. I also have a ADHD inattentive 12 year old (dx at age 7) and she was such an EASY babe/toddler, but wow did I ever KNOW when things were not right for her.<br><br>
So I understand how it feels when your gut is telling you that something just ain't right. And I also understand how difficult it is to articulate that feeling.<br><br>
:bighug:</div>
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Hey there! You know what's funny? When we were all pregnant I started a thread asking everyone what they thought their babies would be like based on their "personality" inutero. And when I described the way dd was while pregnant you told me that it sounded just like your dd when you were pregnant with her.<br><br>
Anyways, we're actually still in AZ. Dh came home in late April and he separated from the military about 6 weeks ago. He still hasn't been able to find a job so we're just sort of floundering right now and hoping something comes along. There are so many intelligence jobs out there and yet he hasn't gotten any good leads at all. He actually went and applied at Home Depot this past weekend <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Oh and yeah, dd is totally average or above average when it comes to her milestones which is one reason it's taken me this long to start to really worry about her growth, kwim?<br><br>
And oddly enough, which makes this whole thing so hard to describe, is that over all I would say she's a really happy and healthy kid. She just cries a lot and doesn't grow. I know those 2 sentences don't match at all. That's why this is so hard to explain.<br><br>
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To everyone else: really and seriously, I am a researcher of things. It's just what I do. I hope to high heaven she is just high needs and her allergies are why she's not growing. I hope it's a simple and easy thing.<br><br>
I talked to my best friend today about my worries. She has a 4 yr old with sensory integration disorder along with some other issues. She is sending me some links and a good book about it. She said she has always thought that dd sounded just like her dd and she's always wondered about it but didn't want to mention it to me and freak me out.<br><br>
One of her suggestions was that when she seems to want to be picked up but then just freaks out when he pick her, she probably just likes the feeling of being lifted through the air, so we should try swinging her around or spinning instead of just holding her. I've been doing that all morning when she wants to be picked up and it's working! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 
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