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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Vaccine Hasn't Cancelled Chicken Pox Entirely<br>
A recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that a single shot of the Varicella vaccine, first introduced in 1995, does not produce a sufficient immune response in as many as 20% of people who receive it. As a result, older children, teens, and young adults are developing chickenpox, even after being vaccinated, and are often becoming much sicker than younger children who contract the virus.<br>
As Reported by Los Angeles Times</td>
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You know, when I began researching vax, I came across a similar argument for pertussis - we didn't have these deadly cases of infant pertussis when people actually acquired immunity to it - but now it's recommended that all adults have more boosters because the vax doesn't last and so now the demographics have changed to be much more dangerous.<br><br>
Interested to hear what others have learned about this issue...
 

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It's called an epidemiological shift, aka a "perverse effect of vaccination". This is what has happened with mumps, although it's still not a huge deal, since mumps is really mild (usually) even in adults.<br>
The worst is the situation we have with measles. On the bright side, the vax is working well enough to where transmission is more or less completely disrupted. But when there are epidemics now, they are way, way more deadly than they were in the prevaccine era. 10 times more deadly. Before the vax, infants had immunity for almost a year, but now it's only a couple of months. And measles isn't the mildest virus out there to begin with, but it's really bad news in little babies. And measles also hits adults now, which it virtually never did before mass immunization.<br><br>
I actually don't think pertussis has shifted, though. The vax doesn't appear to do much of anything to disrupt transmission, and even natural immunity doesn't seem to do much for disrupting transmission. Serological surveys show that everyone catches pertussis every 2-5 years. If natural immunity lasted long enough to matter, or immunity that prevented transmission lasted more than a year or two, I really don't think we'd have that much of it.<br><br>
Regarding infants, we only have 10-20 deaths a year from pertussis. Even if you assume that for every death there are one or two more with severe long term damage, it''s still not that big when you think about a 4 million birth cohort each year. So I think that's probably always been with us.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mamakay</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7934365"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's called an epidemiological shift, aka a "perverse effect of vaccination". This is what has happened with mumps, although it's still not a huge deal, since mumps is really mild (usually) even in adults.<br>
The worst is the situation we have with measles. On the bright side, the vax is working well enough to where transmission is more or less completely disrupted. But when there are epidemics now, they are way, way more deadly than they were in the prevaccine era. 10 times more deadly. Before the vax, infants had immunity for almost a year, but now it's only a couple of months. And measles isn't the mildest virus out there to begin with, but it's really bad news in little babies. And measles also hits adults now, which it virtually never did before mass immunization.<br><br>
I actually don't think pertussis has shifted, though. The vax doesn't appear to do much of anything to disrupt transmission, and even natural immunity doesn't seem to do much for disrupting transmission. Serological surveys show that everyone catches pertussis every 2-5 years. If natural immunity lasted long enough to matter, or immunity that prevented transmission lasted more than a year or two, I really don't think we'd have that much of it.<br><br>
Regarding infants, we only have 10-20 deaths a year from pertussis. Even if you assume that for every death there are one or two more with severe long term damage, it''s still not that big when you think about a 4 million birth cohort each year. So I think that's probably always been with us.</div>
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Am I to understand that a case of pertussis gives lifetime immunity or not. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> I dont intend on hijacking, but I keept getting mixed info regarding immunity to pertussis.<br>
TIA <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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It does not give life long immunity.<br><br>
I am faintly puzzled by my own experience however. I was never vaxed for pertussis. I did not have it as a child. I don't think I've ever had it as an adult. I know I've been exposed at least once.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Deborah</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7935825"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It does not give life long immunity.<br><br>
I am faintly puzzled by my own experience however. I was never vaxed for pertussis. I did not have it as a child. I don't think I've ever had it as an adult. I know I've been exposed at least once.</div>
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I'd say you've almost definitely had it. You probably just got lucky and had a really mild first case.
 
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