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When should you take the pinky away for the child?

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OkI think it is time to get rid of the pinky and I have tried different stuff I am lost. i am so sick of the darn thing. I think she is too old for it. She is 14 months. I have read books I have done it al now what.<br>
ANY IDEAS????? Save me fron the pinky PLS <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent">
 

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I don't know that I'll ever get rid of her pinky. Makes such a nice set of 10 fingers, y'know? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
"Binky"?<br><br>
I didn't vote because I'm not sure about a "should," absolute rule for all kids. I do think research shows that kids who have a pacifier in the first month, breastfeed less -- a negative outcome. After that, though, aren't the main concerns tooth mispositioning and speech delays? How is your child on those areas?<br><br>
My experience is limited because my toddler much prefers my nipple to an artificial one. She's used a pacifier maybe a dozen times (ever), when she's teething.
 

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My ds is sleep dependant on one. Has been from day one. I let him nurse to sleep, but the second he came off in his sleep he would cry until he had something to suck on. My dd was the same way. Ds is now 20 months, he still has it. I asked the ped about it. He said it's not a problem until after two. For now just to only give it to him at nap time and bed time, not let him walk around during the day with it. We're working ont hat one for now. Ds will probably have his a bit longer than 2. We're expecting another baby a month after he turns two and I jsut don't want to take it away right before or right after the baby is born.
 

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Once again, I can't vote in your poll.<br><br>
I feel if you decide to give a paci, it's just nuts to take it away while your is used to it for comfort/security.<br><br>
My son uses a paci at naps and bedtime, and if he's upset or tired. I have no plans to even think about taking it away anytime soon.<br><br>
Why does it bother you?
 

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I was a big-time thumbsucker and blanket carrier until way past most parents would "allow" such a thing. Fortunately, my mom was very patient and let me give it up in my own time. (She even made me a less obvious blanket out of one of her old nightgowns to take on sleepovers with me when I got older so I wouldn't be embarrassed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">) I needed those things for some reason and she recognized that and let me be. (Btw, I have perfect teeth... I believe the thumb and pacifier = bad teeth thing has been debunked).<br><br>
So, I guess my position on these things is obvious: Let them alone until the child decides to give it up. I just don't believe in forcing my preferences on my child when it's not absolutely vital.<br><br>
I understand how it can be hard to see your child do something that you're not comfortable with. My kid shakes his feet when he's going to sleep. It's a comfort thing for him that was passed on from his dad. It drove me nutso when my ex did it and it drives me nutso when he does it. It's my issue, though, and it's something he apparently needs, so I grin and bear it.<br><br>
You probably have outside pressure from society, as well, telling you your child is getting too big for a pacifier (or, at least, some residual pressure that you've internalized and are projecting now). Now is as good a time as any to learn to let that stuff slide right off of you.
 

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I have zero experience with this. Dd never took a pacifier. (thought lord knows I tried in those first couple colicky months!)<br><br>
I like what Dragonfly said. If it's a source of comfort, why give it up? Perhaps you could restrict it to nap time and bed time like other posters mentioned? I have a friend who lets her daughter only use her pacifier in her room, and no where else, so if she wants to suck on it, she has to do it only in that room. No taking it out.<br><br>
I admit that I have a reaction when I see an older toddler or young child walking around with a pacifier in their mouth. But I realize that's *my* issue.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>SEEPAE</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I dont think either would cause major problems at a young age but if allowed to 4+ years then I can definitely see it!</div>
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Is the mouth still forming at that age? I'd think if anything it would be prone to cause problems earlier on, not so much the later. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"><br><br>
I don't know for certain about pacifiers, but I've heard from more than one dentist that thumb-sucking isn't a problem for teeth. I suppose as with anything, it's probably a matter of degree, though. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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Experts opinions vary on this one ... but the general agreement is that as long as the sucking (thumb or paci) is not constant and ends sometime before age 5, it should not cause malformation of the mouth or teeth.<br><br>
Of course, there are exceptions. I never sucked my thumb or a paci and had HORRIBLE teeth that needed braces for nearly 4 years. Go figure.
 

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Also, if my child sucked it's thumb (which my dd did in utero, according to u/s, but never after born), I would try very hard to give them a paci. You can get rid of them, you can't get rid of the thumb. My sister is 20 and she still sucks her thumb.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>seren</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Also, if my child sucked it's thumb (which my dd did in utero, according to u/s, but never after born), I would try very hard to give them a paci. You can get rid of them, you can't get rid of the thumb. My sister is 20 and she still sucks her thumb.</div>
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I agree. I watched all 3 of my younger sisters struggle with quitting sucking their thumbs, all school-age, around K-1st grade. They *wanted* to stop, but had so much trouble.<br><br>
Alex sucked his thumb in utero and began to suck it as an infant ... once we got bf'ing established (which took nearly 8 weeks) I gave him a paci. I know pacis can get "lost" at some point, whereas quitting a thumb is soooo hard because it's right there on your hand.<br><br>
Everyone has an opinion on this one, and I really have no problems with thumb or paci sucking, but in our case, I knew I wanted a paci sucker so it would be easier to take away the temptation at some point. When that will be, I don't know. He's 25 months and <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> his paci, I don't feel he's anywhere near ready to let it go yet. He seems to need the sucking to calm down still. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 
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