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Discussion Starter #1
<p>"The study found that an astonishing 49 percent of toddlers born from 2004 through 2008 hadn't had all their shots by their second birthday, but only about 2 percent had parents who refused to have them vaccinated. They were missing shots for pretty mundane reasons—parents' work schedules, transportation problems, insurance hiccups. An earlier CDC study concluded that children in poor communities were more likely to miss their shots than those in wealthier neighborhoods, and while that may not be too surprising, it's still a dangerous pattern."</p>
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<p><a href="http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2013/05/vaccines-whooping-cough" target="_blank">http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2013/05/vaccines-whooping-cough</a></p>
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<p>I though this was interesting.  There is lots of room to improve among the people who have no objection to Vaccinating on Schedule (VOS).</p>
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<p>A unvaccinated teen in my neighborhood died of influenza.  Her parents had no objections to vaccinations, they just did not get around to it.</p>
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I wonder how many people think of themselves as VOS when they actually aren't?  Does everyone (when it's recommended) in your family get the flu shot many weeks before Thanksgiving?</p>
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<p>PS: I posted this earlier but botched the title.  Could not edit the title.</p>
 

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<p>Quote:</p>
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/community/t/1400708/the-real-reason-kids-arent-getting-vaccines#post_17612738" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false">
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<p>Originally Posted by <strong>tadamsmar</strong> <a href="/community/t/1400708/the-real-reason-kids-arent-getting-vaccines#post_17612738"><img alt="View Post" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a></p>
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<p>I wonder how many people think of themselves as VOS when they actually aren't?  Does everyone (when it's recommended) in your family get the flu shot many weeks before Thanksgiving?</p>
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<p>PS: I posted this earlier but botched the title.  Could not edit the title.</p>
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<p>That's a good question. My DS is technically selectively vaxed since I originally delayed for two years and so didn't have to catch him up on all of the shots that are considered pre-school shots here (Hib, Rota, PCV). He also hasn't had Hep A or flu shot ever. My husband won't get the flu shot, and I haven't either. This year is the first year I planned to get it because we were TTC, but had a terrible tragedy in the family, relocated twice, and by the time I settled down again flu season was nearly over and I decided to wait it out.</p>
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<p>But with that said, flu has only been recommended for everyone since 2010. I think a lot of people still have the perception that it is only for certain, high-risk groups. I thought so until recently, simply because I wasn't keeping up with changing recommendations. My sons pediatrician hasn't brought it up, either.</p>
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<p>So I don't think we are VOS at all. Though we're up to date on the regular shots (Polio, Hep B, MMR, DTaP/DTP), I can't say they were all done on schedule for various reasons. VOS is <em>more</em> of a goal for me now than when my son was younger.</p>
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<p>Another one that I think is unlikely to be used as recommended is the Tdap during pregnancy. A lot of people (including doctors) are resistant getting/giving shots during pregnancy. I did an informal quiz in my birth group a few weeks back to see whose providers had recommended the shot for them or mentioned it at any point, and for the vast majority it had never been brought up. One woman said her midwife mentioned it, but she declined it and the midwife agreed with her reasons.</p>
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<p>Most of the women had no idea it was a recommendation and knew very little about it. There was one woman in the group who had been vaccinated during her last pregnancy, and about 15 or so who either hadn't heard of it or were opposed to it.</p>
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<p>People think the shot itself is very new. Tdap has been recommended to replace the Td booster since at least 2005, and even the pregnancy recommendation has been made since 2011, with an update in 2012.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #3
<p>For the 2013-14 flu season there was a new quad flu vaccine that protected against 4 strains rather than 3.   This was the first time it was available.</p>
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<p>I wonder how many people even knew about this?  I did not know till Is was ask to choose at the pharmacy and chose  the quad. But my wife was not even asked and did not get the quad.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #4
<p>The flu vaccine is also recommended for pregnant women.   And before getting pregnant, it is recommended that you get tested for rubella immunity blood test and get vaccinated before pregnancy if not immune.  And there are other situations where vaccines are recommended, see here:</p>
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<p><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/adults/rec-vac/pregnant.html" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/adults/rec-vac/pregnant.html</a></p>
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<p>There are lots of details for VOS!</p>
 

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While I don't normally worry about flu shots for myself as I hit no increased risk factors normally, I made really sure to get it both years I was pregnant (which included the h1n1 pandemic years). The stats on extra complications for pregnant women who catch flu I find pretty worrying, so for me the reassurance of having done everything I could (as well as all the hygiene measures etc) was really worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
<p>You still are at increased risks of spreading it, right?  It's recommended for all but the few who don't pass the safety screen.</p>
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<p>Excellent advice to get vaxed and also take the recommended hygiene measures as if you were a non-vaxer, since the shot is far from perfect.</p>
 

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You're absolutely right of course. I'm convinced it's very safe (I sought it out while pregnant after all). The UK suggestion is that it's not necessary healthy adults and children get it, although I can go to a pharmacy and pay to have it if I want fairly easily.<br><br>
We're quite careful about hygiene. My husband was brought up always washing hands the minute you get in the house (as well as frequently otherwise), which we have been encouraging our kids to do.<br><br>
No one should think vaccines are magic fairy dust which protects from everything. They demonstrably reduce the chance of catching VPD by various factors (depending on the disease in question). The data is very clear on that. However, no vaccine is 100% effective, and there are always people for who they work less well (eg the fully vaccinated lady with measles in NYC recently). So in my family we try to follow all the good health advice I have learned about (some from the mothering magazine I was gifted a subscription to when my first child was born), like eating healthy, not too much processed food, not too much refined sugar, good hygiene etc in addition to the vaccinations.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
<p>I see, the UK recommendations are different, it's recommended for everyone (but a few with safety issues) in the US.</p>
 

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I find the differences in recommendations interesting. No one in the uk says its a bad idea to be this, just that it's not that helpful in otherwise healthy adults. The exception is those who work with at risk groups.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
<p>I guess it's based on vaccine availability.  If availability is low, the recommendations are more like the UK.  Here are the details:</p>
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<p><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/whoshouldvax.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/whoshouldvax.htm</a></p>
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<p>But I don't know why availability would be less in the UK.</p>
 
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