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I decided to test the water with homeschooling this summer. If my ds is able to grasp some skills in the process then we will do it for third grade school year as well.<br><br>
My ds has learning disabilities and a few quirks. He transitions easily, has ability to stay on task most time (turned 8 last month). He is s l o w l y improving on his reading skills but, he doesn't retain very much. He can't think abstractly<br><br>
for ex;<br>
I will ask;.. you have 5 fingers on one hand . Hold up 2 fingers from your other hand and tell me how many you have?<br><br>
He has to count from 1 to 5 on the one hand ..he can't just think 5. He has to use manipulatives and it takes him a really long time to work out problems. Subtraction is even harder because he will forget what he is doing and start adding. He brings home papers with most of the answers wrong because of this.<br><br>
He told me they are starting multiplication and I know he won't be able to do it yet since he hasn't mastered adding and subtracting yet.<br><br>
He has dysgraphia and his handwriting is pretty much unreadable. Even to himself most times. We have tried so many things and his OT suggested I start him on a typing program.<br><br>
He is pretty good at sounding out words phonically but reading comprehension is difficult sometimes.<br><br>
I am browsing curriculum and have snooped this side of the forum for quite some time now. I am reading hs books and searching websites so I can prepare. I really don't know if any curriculum is going to work for us though. I think any way I cut it that the paper and pen method will be the same as how he is taught at school.<br>
1. Here is the problem or question/excercise<br>
2. This is how they want us to do it<br>
3. Here is an example<br>
4. Now do these problems<br><br>
I think he will have to learn material another way first and then hopefully will be able to do it in a traditional scholar way after.<br><br>
I saw the Knights of Knowledge Math post and think something play based will help. I thought that letting him blog on a laptop would help get learn sentence structure, punctuation, ect. while still being able to write about something he finds interesting. Also it would help typing skills. He loves to cook independently and work with his hands for busy work. I like the idea of unschooling but still want him to be able to do book work. I don't know how long we will hs but he will probably go back to public school eventually and will need to know traditional habits too.<br><br><b>Any suggestions?</b><br><br><br>
As far as extra services through the ps he can still get occupational therapy during homeschooling if the budget $ was put aside so I will have to find out. His OT this year was absent a LOT and wouldn't return my calls or letters so I am not sure whether it is a loss or not.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"><br>
We have lots of exercise ideas anyway.
 

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I am new to the whole HS thing so I don't have alot of advice.<br><br>
I just wanted to say that your son is so lucky to have a great momma who understands his needs and is taking the time to HS him so he also has the ability to learn in his own special way.<br><br>
Best of luck on your HS journey!
 

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Does he have any specific diagnosis? I have a mildly dyslexic 7yo, and found lots of good resources just by googling "dyslexic 7yo". It sounds like he is a very tactile/visual learner, so you probably want to go with hands-on stuff. Right Start is a math curr that might work for you guys - it uses lots of manipulatives, but in particular in the early levels it uses an abacus to help kids visualize number relationships.<br><br>
In general, though, probably the best thing you can do for him is just to NOT rush him forward into "third grade stuff". The beauty of homeschooling is that you can let a kid spend a little longer on the foundations of learning, if they are not picking them up as quickly as their peers. So my only real advice would be NOT to put too much pressure on him (and yourself!) during your "test run".
 
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