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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i reckon the title says it all, but dh and i have really hit a plateau with our almost 2 1/2 year old--to the point that everything that worked or felt good or even sometimes was played with has gone down the pooper....with other transtitions, we were able to ebb somewhat smoothly, combining the old with the new...now nothing seems to be working and there are lots of tears and much frustration on our parts....it's almost as if he wants his whole world to rip open and experience a whole lot of loud and bright newness--but he's a sensitive bugger and on top of that needs lots of sleep to fuel his sanguine fire.....any suggestions to reconnect with our kiddo? new activities? new bedtime routines? new 'big-little-kid' stuff/songs/etc that he might want to do?<br><br>
we thought this was a phase, but three weeks later we're at the point where we're dreading the next day....eesh!<br><br>
TIA<br><br>
kyara
 

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When ds went through this, i just transitioned to spending most of the day, every day, outdoors. If possible, at the playground with other kids. I don't know if this works for you, but ds doesn't need entertainment if he's outside... we also were doing a project every morning, something with his hands. If he makes a new (simple) toy every day... maybe it will be enough 'newness'?
 

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Also, as I read your post, I am reminded of my determination that each time ds and I reach this point of frustration, it is a sign that he needs more independence. Maybe in a small way, like washing his hands by himself. Or maybe in a big way, like washing all the windows in the house by himself.<br>
But it really seems to help, when I remember this, and loosen up a bit, allowing more independence. they do need to grow up, slowly, and sometimes they have remind us of that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks, zansmama--would love to hear more about your daily hands-on activity....are you guys always 'making' something, or just expressing through clay/beeswax, etc....that sounds like it would be right up our alley....<br><br>
also, as for the independence theme--jonah kai can, rather scarily, take care of himself on many levels...not that we just walk away and say good luck, kid! but he enjoys dressing himself, washing the dishes, brushing teeth, using his toilet and then cleaning up....so we nuture that and take time out of the day to ensure that he can do those things and not feel rushed....<br><br>
the main problem really seems to be an obedience thing--lots of "no's" lately and constant vascillation on what he wants to do.....despite all of our reading and GD Beyond the Rainbow Bridge-style, again dh and I are left speechless and are giving ourselves time outs.<br><br>
eeesh
 

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constant vascillation(sp?): We just went with the "it's time for_" style. No options, just rhythm. "It's time for lunch", "it's time to go outside", "It's time to read", etc. "why" or "I don't want to", is thus easily answered by 'oh, but it's <i>time</i> to", with a sort of shrug like: it's out of my hands. Ds totally accepted this and would ask: "what time is it?" eager for the next idea. Of course, sometimes when it was "time to do the dishes", ds would opt to play with trucks,or something, but it gives a structured feel.<br><br>
Our rhythm at 2 1/2, as far as morning activity went, was playdough, painting, craft (toy-making), baking, and craft, by weekday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
wonderful! thank you kindly, zansmama <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br>
i'm trying to picture jonah reacting to "it's time"....i feel like these days it would just be a flat out, deadpan "no"....<br>
regardless, i'm excited to try these new words tomorrow.....and may i ask what kind of crafts/toy-making would you engage in for this age? we do the painting, playdough, beeswax, sand, soil, h20 thing--but i couldn't even begin to think about toy ideas...and instead of me asking you 1,984 more questions, if there was a book that you loved for this age, let me know.....<br><br>
i truly think we all need a mentor parent to physically guide us through these transititions....ok, that and lots of rescue remedy...<br><br>
thanks again my dear....much appreciated.
 

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this isn't at all waldorf related, but it is 2.5 yo related, so i hope its acceptable. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> i have been reading "your two year old" and am quite shocked and fascinated by how accurate these authors are about the differences btwn 2 and 2.5. its an easy read and likely available at your library. kind of old, but very insightful. at least for me.
 

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craft idea my 2.5 yo loves (and my preschool class!) is felting wool balls.<br><br>
all you need is warm-hot water, wool roving, dish soap (i know its not organic but dawn works best for some reason)<br><br>
put the soap on some roving and roll it around in your hands dipping it once in a while into the warm water. continue adding thin spread out layers of roving onto the ball and rolling it round.<br><br>
its an easy project and the experience is delicious even if you don't end up with a ball. (mamas can also easily 'fix' the ball if end results are important!)
 

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bead threading can make necklaces or small toys... beeswax of course makes _whatever_<br>
Um... hats, tiny "books", I'll keep brainstorming...<br>
Egg carton caterpillars...
 

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I think the "it's time for" is a great idea. Even independent kids need boundaries. Not sure what Waldorf says about age 2 and 1/2... but I've found that our dd who will be 3 in 3 wks just goes thru occasional periods of needing her boundaries reinforced.<br><br>
For example, we use a lot of either/or type stuff, often phrased as a question: "Can you wash up your hands for lunch <span style="text-decoration:underline;">all by yourself</span> or do you need me to help you?" She knows that if she fails to choose, then mommy *is* going to help regardless of how much she fusses and decides that she wanted to do it herself. This rarely happens tho since she knows what the result of not deciding or vacillating is - mommy helps her. Occasionally, she really does want help with something - and that's ok. It's a win/win situation.<br><br>
At times I've felt more like "she needs to obey!!" and it only ends up being a battle of the wills. Instead, she gets a win/win choice. On those occasions when she's testy, I just stick to the rules - you vacillate or don't decide, then mommy helps.<br><br>
Along with the "it's time for" we have also found it helpful to talk about attitudes - yes with a 2 yr old.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> "You are sad that we can't continue to play outside, but we have to eat lunch. You can decide to enjoy your lunch, or you can decide to be miserable." etc.<br><br>
We are actually dealing with this right now. She's suddenly finding it hard to leave fun things and will cry that she just wants to stay, despite a transition time. We are also telling her that she ought to decide to be happy that she got to do whatever fun thing and she can be happy that she had the experience rather than sad that it's over - it's her choice. Usually after a minute or so of fussing, she decides that she is going to decide to be happy. It's a fine line I find between honoring emotions and correcting attitudes - equipping her to work thru her emotions rather than just accepting them and getting bogged down in them. I think there are 2 extremes - not honoring how a kid feels, or just accepting it and not teaching them how to get past it.<br><br>
I am also not above saying "if you are going to fuss when we are done reading stories and it's time for bed, then we just won't read stories before bed anymore. Do we need to stop reading stories, or can you go to bed afterwards nicely?" (we lie there with her as she falls asleep - she just wants more stories.)<br><br>
I find that in challenging seasons particularly, being consistent with "rules" of how we do things is very helpful. Most kids won't continue to challenge when they find "that's just the way things are". It's when their fussing and challenging gets them somewhere that they will keep it up.<br><br>
Anyway, those are our experiences - for whatever they are worth. Good luck! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 
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