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Discussion Starter #1
OK, so this may seem like a strange question, but I just really don't know, and can't find the info...<br>
What happens with the umbilical cord? I always thought it was cut? but then I read something about it falling off? I plan on having an unassisted birth, so I thought this is prudent information to know. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br>
Thanks a bundle!
 

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You can do lotus in which you do nothing and let it fall off on its own (you will need to have something to carry the placenta around in with baby while waiting for it to fall off.<br><br>
Or you could just wait until it turns white, tie it off (or clamp if you so desire) and cut.
 

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I highly reccomend lotus birth. You should research it and see what you think. I am so glad we had a lotus birth with DD!
 

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I researched lotus birth, but it didn't appeal to me at all. We waited til the placenta was out, tied the cord w/ shoelaces, and cut it. I wasn't into the idea of hauling around a placenta for even a couple of days. Both my girls took 2 weeks to lose the stump, and maybe it'd be faster if we did the lotus thing but also maybe not. That was just me, I didn't see a real benefit.
 

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Just wait til it quits pulsating and tie it up and cut.<br><br>
I said I wanted to tie it up with a pretty pink ribbon and I got laughed at!!<br><br>
Anyway, I understand where you're coming from. One of DH's first questions was "What do we do with the placenta?" and I said we eat it, of course, like the animals do. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Then when he stopped believing me about that, I told him that really I wanted to plant it in the flower garden.
 

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Not sure if you are referencing Lotus birth or not, but if you aren't...<br><br>
If the umbilical cord is cut, it is cut several inches away from the baby, and it is that part that shrivels up, and falls off, leaving a cute little belly button.
 

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With our UC, we waited until the cord stopped pulsating---it looked like a piece of white, limp pasta. Then my DH tied it with some cord tie we bought from InHisHands.com and cut it. Her cord stump and the tie came off about 6 days later on its own without using any types of cleansers (like rubbing alcohol) or drying agents.
 

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I want to plant mine as well. I was thinking about planting a peach tree or something above it.<br><br>
With my DD's birth, there was a nick in the cord when she came out of the water, so we clamped and cut the cord immediately (was going to wait till it stopped pulsing). I don't know how common that is, but I didn't want to risk blood flowing out of it. Because of the rush, I liked the cord clamps that we got better than the ties option because they're so fast. I think I might have both on hand this time. Clamp and cut and then tie closer to the baby and retie w/ a pink shoelace or something. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you so much for all your replies!<br><br>
So, in a lotus birth can you still eat the placenta when it's all dried out? I plan on reclaiming the nutrients from teh placenta and I've read many places that eating the placenta can really help reduce postpartum depression. do you know any resources where i can read about this!
 

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With a lotus birth you can clamp off a small part of the placenta and eat it immediately while it's fresh if you wish (to help the uterus contract and control bleeding). You can also salt it liberally in the days between the birth and the natural separation of the cord, to encourage it to dry. I don't know whether that would be effective in making it edible afterwards, though. I'd probably see if it seemed anything like palatable and, if so, cook it halfway into the next dimension. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I do know that an unsalted placenta can begin to smell quite strongly within the time it takes for natural separation...
 
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