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Hi Mamas-<br>
Anyone using this/have ideas on it. I love some of the ideas and yet I'm afraid that it will take the 'joy' from learning because of all the structure.<br>
Thanks,<br>
MM
 

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The title of the book and hearing about the scheduling really turned me off, so I put off reading it for a couple of years. Thankfully I did eventually read it.<br><br>
I think its a great book if you want to present a strong language and history base in your homeschool. I do find that it doesn't really give much guidance in math or science.<br><br>
I was really drawn to the chronological study of history, don't know why it never occured to me before reading the book! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"> We use the Story of the World as our history spine.<br><br>
I also like that they emphasize a gentle approach to preschool and kindergarten age children. Narrations have been a godsend, and my oldest, who is 7.5, has benefitted from it greatly.<br><br>
As with many homeschooling/education/learning books out there, take what works for you and leave the rest! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> Make the method work for you, not the other way around. HTH!
 

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If you go to <a href="http://www.welltrainmind.com" target="_blank">www.welltrainmind.com</a> you'll find that the authors were forced to put in the schedules by their publisher and they *don't* like them.<br><br>
That said, we do everything in a very relaxed manner. I just printed off all of the letters in upper and lower case to see what my daughter knows and doesn't. I'll ask her about them until she looses interest in it. She's just about to turn three so we do lots of fantasy play and arts and crafts. We do follow Annabelle's interests, too. Right now anything pink that dances we read about.<br><br>
I love the book and if I have to put Annabelle in school I'll still use it for "after schooling".<br><br>
My one main concern right now is that it's so focused on Western culture. I may use Isaac Asamov's World History book which is all chronological and takes the whole world into account.
 

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We're starting it in the fall.<br><br>
I'm not following their intensive schedule (in fact, I have heard that Susan Wise Bauer hated including that in the book, but I do know that her schooling schedule is a bit long for my tastes), but adapting it to fit us. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
It's all so exciting! For the first time since I started homeschooling, even dh is excited!
 

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I am in the middle of this dilemma right now, too. I read the book in the spring and have bought most of the recommended books and a few others (Story of the World and workbook, First Language Lessons). Last year, for first grade, we were radical unschoolers; it wasn't a failure, but we definitely need some structure. My "problem" is basically one of finding the necessary balance. I don't want to turn my kids off TWTM by doing too much (or too much they hate), but I also don't want to fall so far behind that I can't use the structure they have set up (why reinvent the wheel, kwim?)<br><br>
I am having a really hard time getting comfortable with the whole homeschooling lifestyle. I love having the kids around and love learning with them, but I often feel that we easily fall into periods when it is either "all (house) work" or "all (school, kids, and fun) play." Maybe this is normal, but I can't get comfortable with it. Sometimes I feel like no matter what I am doing, I feel like I "should" be doing something else. I need a more constant balance, where I feel that "enough" (not all) of everything is getting done on a regular basis. These swings of getting lots of one type of thing done while everything else falls by the wayside, and then playing catch-up in another area while everything else slides for a while is really beginning to get to me. Everyone always says "find what works for your family," but no one ever says how to go about it. Any advice?
 

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Cassidy, I know how you feel. It is very normal in HSing from what I have read so far. Annabelle loved the winter circle time but refused to do the spring one and the summer one has been hit or miss.<br><br>
I use a very personalize FlyLady system to keep up with housework and "schooling". I have a set rhythm that I try and follow. Some days it works and others it doesn't. How about setting aside one day a week for sit-down-at-the-table school?<br><br>
HTHs!
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Make the method work for you, not the other way around.</td>
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My thoughts exactly. We use TWTM as a starting point for setting up our curriculum. It was very good for me when we first started because it helped me feel confident that we were covering everything we needed to. We were probably too rigid at first, but over time our style has become more and more laid back. Now I know DD learns best when we follow her lead. I don't think we'll ever find the perfect system, but I think the more different approaches I explore the closer we get.<br><br>
We also use the Story of the World for history. DD loves it, she reads it to herself at bedtime.
 

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I know nothing about TWTM but wanted to second the Flylady suggestion. I have also personalized it to fit my needs and it REALLY helps me.<br><br>
I also feel strongly about involving kids in housework and making it FUN <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/banana.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="banana"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wash.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wash">. Think of it as Home Economics <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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I just finished reading TWTM, and intend to use its suggestions when I start homeschooling. It makes more sense to me than some of the other stuff I've researched, and I kept thinking it was the sort of curriculum I'd had as a child, I'd have thrived...except I do think the science curriculum was lacking, so I've already started designing one of my own. I might not think so if I wasn't a science geek, I guess, but I do intend to keep the tie-ins w/ history and all, just with the major areas of science all being visited to some extent every year, because who knows when or what will really spark a child's interest/imagination? To me it's all about making sure they're exposed to the whole smorgasboard and have the tools to learn it all, I think it's great...and I'm planning on utilizing some of their curriculum suggestions to do a bit of remedial learning for myself--specifically in Logic and the Great Books!<br><br>
The only thing that bothered me is that they kept touting the A Beka grammar course as being SO rigorous, while making secular suggestions that they admit are inferior. This leaves me looking for my own grammar curriculum, as A Beka is definitely too far along a religious branch that is not my own (I took Beka high school Spanish in middle school so I'm familiar with their curricula to some extent).
 

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First, Cassidy:<br><br>
Every morning we get up, go for a walk, the kids eat while I shower, then we do "school" My two year old is now interested in doing school with us (that looks different everyday...usually letters, numbers, colors, shapes....chlakboard, sand, worksheets, cut and paste, etc) We work for about 2 hours...We start with a read aloud, then while 6 y/o ds does handwriting and phonics I do a bit of work in the kitchen, which is close to the boys desks, so I am available. Then we move on to Math, and Science/History. Then we play or go for a walk to the postoffice, BX, and Commissary. Then lunch, and then a quick walk to put the two year old to sleep, and then nap/quiet time for them. During this time Zac picks out books to read or just look at while resting. They usually stay in their room for 2 hours in the afternoons while I do some pilates and housework...usually just a chore or two. The boys usually help with laundry, Zac loves to put away his clothes (a habit I'm trying to ingrain before he is a teenager!!) Luke (2y/o) just loves putting things in the washer and dryer.<br><br>
W use TWTM and don't adhere to the schedule much at all. We just do what works for us. Sometimes we are very history heavy, but I figure if I am reading aloud, who cares if it is literature or history or Science. I make sure handwriting, phonics and math get done everyday and then if he wants more history...more history it is.<br><br>
I have checked out flylady and lots ofher methods make sence, but since I am typically a very organized person, I usually just do what works for me and work out my own schedule. And with two boys and a bigger one, I do lots of housework mroe than once a week and cleaning closets and junk drawers is like therapy for me...I am the queen of rubbermaid...those are the best. I have nice little bins for everything!!! However, if you are not the organzied type, her suggestions are FANTASTIC. I was just raised by a flylady look alike and picked up a lot growing up....nto too much...I still leave a little dust to see the little fingerprints in...<br><br>
Hope that helps.<br><br>
Susan in Turkey
 
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