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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I know the answer, but I want to double check. We've been offered a less then 6 month old wolf/ husky blend. I have 2 kids- 4.5 (autistic) and 1.5. Both girls.
We have the space and time, but it wouldn't be a good fit the with kids, right? I've lived with wold blends before, but never with an unpredictable kid.

And if now isn't the time- when would you consider a dog like that?
 

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That is tough to pass up!

I would say if you have the time and resources to train this puppy, it could work. But you sound like you know its a bad idea and you just need someone else to agree! I know how that is! I bug my DH all the time: "Soo I know this isn't a good idea, but what do you think about this cat? dog? etc?"

For us, I think we would like to wait until our youngest kid is over 10 and really understands how to act around a dog.

We took in a foster dog about 6 months ago. DS is now 9 months old and starting to crawl and I have to put the dog outside when DS is crawling in the same room as him. This dog does not like being bothered when he is lying down and although he licks DS and is protective over him when the dog is walking around, I don't want to take the chance that DS does something like pull his tail and the dog turns and snaps. Honestly, I hope he gets adopted very soon!

This will be our last dog for a while, until DS and future children can really understand how to interact around dogs. Although DS seems to have stopped grabbing the cats and is petting nice already! Who knows? I am rambling....
 

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While every dog is an individual, and personality is what matters most, I have to say this does not immediately sound like a good fit to me.

I've been a professional dog trainer and behavior consultant for nearly 20 years, having trained thousands of dogs and people. As much I think people, particularly people with autism, can benefit from an animal companion, I can't imagine bringing a dog with high prey drive and independent nature (like most Sib. Husky's) into a home with a child who's behavior/voice/actions may be unpredictable or sensitive.

Perhaps if you're still really interested, you could find a trainer in your area who would evaluate this hybrid for you?

Tracy
 

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Ive had both wolf mixes and husky mixes before although i haven't had a mix of the two. Its the dogs personality that matters the most. The dogs I have had were wonderful, very sweet and patient. My husky mix helped my daughter learn to walk by allowing DD to hold onto her. However, Ive met mixes like that that were not calm or gentle. I would allow the kids to be around him (supervised) and see how the dog responds.
 

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I'll disclose up front that I am anti-hybrid. I have known one, and she was a lovely animal. My position has nothing to do with personal experience. I'll save the soapbox for another day.

There are hybrids who need homes. I'm not so anti-hybrid that I think they should be euthanized (sterilized, yes.)

I think it's an extremely bad idea to bring a hybrid pup into a home with two small children. I'm glad you agree.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by mamallama View Post
I'll disclose up front that I am anti-hybrid. I have known one, and she was a lovely animal. My position has nothing to do with personal experience. I'll save the soapbox for another day.

There are hybrids who need homes. I'm not so anti-hybrid that I think they should be euthanized (sterilized, yes.)

I think it's an extremely bad idea to bring a hybrid pup into a home with two small children. I'm glad you agree.


Antihybrid just for wolf mixes- or any mixes between dog breeds? I'm sure that this is obvious and I'm missing it.
 

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Wow, I love mixed breeds!

A dog, whatever breed, is still a dog. An animal whose lineage includes a dog and an undomesticated canine (wolf, coyote) is a hybrid.

Dogs tend to run true to their lineage. For example, greyhounds chase by sight. Most sighthounds can't be let off leash because their chase instinct runs so deep--when they start to chase they can't be called back.

Sledding breeds are notoriously difficult to leash train. Why? Because they've been bred for countless generations to pull.

Wolves...what do they do? Two things come to mind. One, they range over vast amounts of territory. Hundreds of miles of territory. Wolves can and do trot all day; a 30 mile day is not out of the ordinary. It would be difficult if not impossible to give a captive wolf or hybrid anything close to an appropriate amount of exercise.

The other thing--bite inhibition. Domesticated canines have it, some to a greater degree than others. We (humans) have selected for bite inhibition for thousands of years. Simply put, we've killed the dogs that bit us. Because of the very long process of domestication, dogs generally forgive a great deal of our tresspasses--and most of us are quite ignorant of the ways we violate the code of polite canine communication. Wolves and hybrids may be tame, but by definition they are not domesticated.

It's too much to expect an undomesticated cousin to behave like a dog--to while away the day watching the grass grow as our rude little children stumble over them and insult them. They haven't been bred for it.

Most of us are unprepared to meet the needs of a hybrid. I wouldn't want a canine whose needs I couldn't meet b/c 1-it's not fair to the animal, and 2-animals with unmet needs are difficult (if not dangerous) to live with.

Now, most animals advertised as hybrids are not 50% dog/wolf. I've read that most are 1/8 or less. Does that make it better? I don't know.

I love wolves. I admire them--their nobility, their loyalty, their athletic prowess, their place in their ecosystem...I think about what it must be like to be a captive wolf or hybrid--hearing the proverbial call of the wild and having only a suburban backyard (if that) to patrol.

I could never support the hybrid market. It's not fair to the animal--but beyond that, I wouldn't house an undomesticated (no matter how tame) animal with my children, and I sure as heck wouldn't keep a pack animal on a chain or in a run.

/soapbox
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by mamallama View Post
Wow, I love mixed breeds!

A dog, whatever breed, is still a dog. An animal whose lineage includes a dog and an undomesticated canine (wolf, coyote) is a hybrid.

Dogs tend to run true to their lineage. For example, greyhounds chase by sight. Most sighthounds can't be let off leash because their chase instinct runs so deep--when they start to chase they can't be called back.

Sledding breeds are notoriously difficult to leash train. Why? Because they've been bred for countless generations to pull.

Wolves...what do they do? Two things come to mind. One, they range over vast amounts of territory. Hundreds of miles of territory. Wolves can and do trot all day; a 30 mile day is not out of the ordinary. It would be difficult if not impossible to give a captive wolf or hybrid anything close to an appropriate amount of exercise.

The other thing--bite inhibition. Domesticated canines have it, some to a greater degree than others. We (humans) have selected for bite inhibition for thousands of years. Simply put, we've killed the dogs that bit us. Because of the very long process of domestication, dogs generally forgive a great deal of our tresspasses--and most of us are quite ignorant of the ways we violate the code of polite canine communication. Wolves and hybrids may be tame, but by definition they are not domesticated.

It's too much to expect an undomesticated cousin to behave like a dog--to while away the day watching the grass grow as our rude little children stumble over them and insult them. They haven't been bred for it.

Most of us are unprepared to meet the needs of a hybrid. I wouldn't want a canine whose needs I couldn't meet b/c 1-it's not fair to the animal, and 2-animals with unmet needs are difficult (if not dangerous) to live with.

Now, most animals advertised as hybrids are not 50% dog/wolf. I've read that most are 1/8 or less. Does that make it better? I don't know.

I love wolves. I admire them--their nobility, their loyalty, their athletic prowess, their place in their ecosystem...I think about what it must be like to be a captive wolf or hybrid--hearing the proverbial call of the wild and having only a suburban backyard (if that) to patrol.

I could never support the hybrid market. It's not fair to the animal--but beyond that, I wouldn't house an undomesticated (no matter how tame) animal with my children, and I sure as heck wouldn't keep a pack animal on a chain or in a run.

/soapbox
I figured that's what you meant, but I was just making sure.
 
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