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<a href="http://www.pedialoss.com/" target="_blank">http://www.pedialoss.com/</a><br><br>
Okay, I can understand that childhood obesity is becoming a real problem in the U.S. However, I <b>DO NOT</b> feel the answer is marketing weight loss suppliments to the parents of these children! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="dropjaw"><br><br>
Anyone else have thoughts on this? My husband and I were totally shocked by this...
 

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oh my god. i can't believe that is even for real. i don't even know what to say.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="dropjaw">
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="dropjaw"> is right! Whatever happened to parents teaching children about proper eating? Sadly the parents are probably just as overweight as the kids if not more so. What this country needs is an aggressive, all-inclusive, perhaps even mandatory course in healthy eating, nutrition and portion size as well as the importance of exercise! These kids have no clue how to eat properly, and let's face it the parents most likely have no clue either. There are waaay too many kids sitting in front of a tv, computer, or video game thingie eating themselves into obesity than kids playing, running, walking and just being kids!<br>
Education is what is needed, not pills! Sheesh!
 

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mamof2 - i couldn't agree more (of course, here i am sitting in front of the computer myself while my dd naps!). we do a lot of camping and backpacking...and we got some flack from folks about backpacking when dd was very small (her first backpacking trip was at 3m). most were worried that something bad would happen. how is getting into nature bad? worse case scenario...she still has more of a chance getting killed in a car accident in the city! she LOVES being in the woods, hiking, walking. she would be naked out in the backyard playing all day if i let her.<br><br>
we 'killed' out tv recently because it was getting too easy to let dd watch more and more each day (especially once i got towards the end of pregnancy and she stopped napping). i can easily see how kids get overweight with all the tv that is available, and we didn't even have cable! i can see how parents could fall into the trap of using it as a babysitter. throw in unhealthy, processed and fast foods...and no wonder.<br><br>
i can also see how easy it is for parents to use processed foods to appease their children. we bought dd some 'fruit snacks', mostly sugar, for a road trip. she LOVED them and for a while, we kept buying them. she stopped asking for bananas and apples, and asked for 'fruit snacks' instead. we switched to organic fruit leather, then slowly got her back in the habit of on snacking on REAL fruit (mostly pluots...she loves those things!). it wasn't an easy switch, but it was important to us that refined sugars were not a daily thing.
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by mamaof2</i><br><b>Whatever happened to parents teaching children about proper eating? Sadly the parents are probably just as overweight as the kids if not more so. What this country needs is an aggressive, all-inclusive, perhaps even mandatory course in healthy eating, nutrition and portion size as well as the importance of exercise! These kids have no clue how to eat properly, and let's face it the parents most likely have no clue either.</b></td>
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Yup I agree! I'm an overweight adult, and so is my Dh. I'm SO worried about teaching my children how to eat right, because I have no clue how to teach them! I wasn't taught as a child what a portion was, how much of what was good, how to limit special snacks, or anything like that. If I wanted ice cream for dinner, then I got ice cream for dinner. Now I try to do better (and we are getting there, especially with being pregnant it is a great motivator) its not instinctual and its a long road.<br><br>
Its a PAIN to have to really keep track of what we eat, trying to get in the right servings of this and that, figuring out when a treat is appropriate and when its too much, learning all this stuff I wish I had grown up knowing. Its even harder hearing from every direction different ways we're "supposed" to eat. Limit carbs, no don't eat 8 servings a day, have lots of meat, oh no too much meat is bad for you, ect, ect. Dh and I actually tried to get our insurance (Kaiser) to let us see a nutrionist or go to a class on how to properly eat, or to get just some sort of start on this. They told us to go to Weight Watchers! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"> Not that the program doesn't work, or that its not a good option, but we pay $300 a month for insurance and they won't even help us and instead tell us to go to a program, that if I'm correct, would cost us another $320 a month for both of us to go to?? And as far as I understand it, Weight Watcher's program is just 'points' which may be great to get the weight off, but I don't think using 'points' is going to really help us figure out how we should eat long term.<br><br>
Ok I'm sorry I don't mean to vent so badly, but yes if some energy was put into teaching everyone how to eat properly it would do a world more of good than giving *children* appetite suppresents!
 

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add another <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="dropjaw"><br><br>
Does no one teach basic good nutrition anymore???????
 

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(((Lisa))) I was overfed as a child and in KINDERGARTEN I weighed ready for this? 118 lbs! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="dropjaw"> yup, I have been struggling all my life as well. I am now a vegan (for the most part, but I occasionally eat cheese or honey) and we are raising vegetarian children with limited dairy intake. I am losing weight myself right now, and I have found that the vegan lifestyle is helping me in so many ways.<br><br>
May I recommend a book? Try Dr. Sears The Nutrition Book<br>
I have not gotten it yet, but it has been highly recommended to me! Also look on the web for nutrition info, its free and maybe there is a good board out there for it as well. As for me I am in a communtiy of veggies with a few omni's and I learn form them alot. I dunno if you would be interested in the community, but pm me if you want some info....
 

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LisaLynn, just focus on "teaching your tastebuds" to like healthy foods. It'll be easier for your child who'll be starting from scratch, but it'll work for you too. Once you get used to healthy foods, the fake stuff tastes really weird!<br><br>
My parents stocked the pantry w/very healthy foods for everyday use. We had things like soda and chips and candy only for birthday parties and New Year's Eve, which made them special treats but not "forbidden fruit". Dessert was a separate mini-meal, eaten about 2 hours after dinner, so there was no temptation to eat less dinner in order to have room for dessert. The "sweets" we had for dessert were things like canned fruit, yogurt w/jam, or whole-wheat toast w/butter and honey. Those things are very satisfying treats if your tastebuds aren't accustomed to constant inundations of high-fructose corn syrup! My parents also doled out small portions, and if we wanted more we could ask for seconds. My brother and I have never been overweight, FWIW.<br><br>
As I got older and chose more of my own foods, I did eat somewhat more junk. But I have NEVER been the type to polish off a whole package of something because I just can't resist--I tend to make it last as long as possible by taking a few bites and savoring the taste. Also, I've always had a low tolerance for refined sugar--if I eat 3 pancakes w/syrup, I get shaky and dizzy--and greasiness, and I think those come from not getting my body accustomed to digesting large quantities of sugar and fat.<br><br>
Over the last few years, I've transitioned back toward healthier foods. Gradually, I'm becoming less able to tolerate the less-healthy versions. For instance, I switched from bringing root beer in my lunch for work to bringing orange juice; now, when I go out to lunch, I'm less likely to order soda because I now feel that it doesn't "go with" some foods, and when I do get soda it seems excessively sweet and kind of chemical-flavored. At parties, I used to drink ~1 soda per hour, but now after the first one I'm overwhelmed by the urge to drink water instead. So it's possible to reset tastebuds in adulthood!<br><br>
Good luck! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Try <a href="http://www.earthlingshandbook.org/cookbook.html" target="_blank">my cookbook</a> for some healthy recipe ideas! (Coming soon: new improved healthier version of the pasta salad! As it is, it's not the healthiest thing ever, but at least it's full of vegetables.)
 

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Ugh...just another quick-fix for parents who want a quick fix for everything, including meals. Isn't that the problem in the first place? So now, the parents who have contributed to their children's obesity by taking them for fast food five times a week, giving them way too many sweets, and substituting nutritionally empty "convenience foods" for real meals can continue to put in no effort and rely on this stuff, rather than make healthier foods and encourage exercise, which would actually take some work?<br><br>
I'm not talking about children who have weight issues unrelated to their diets, of course. But man, this gets me riled up. I hate seeing the way most kids eat. People talk about how their kids ask for the stuff because their friends eat it or they see it on TV, and how they HAVE to give it to them, and I just want to scream at them, "There's this really cool word out there that you should try...it's called 'NO'!!!" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">:
 

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Becca and Tracy thank you for the helpful words <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I have been doing much better, and hope to do even more once I get the new mommy thing down a bit! Lucky for me I do enjoy healthy foods (fruit, veggies, ect) I think I just get to a loss when I'm at the grocery store and need to buy things for the week or two for dinners and lunches and such that aren't so much WORK to make and will stay fresh. Both Dh and I love salads, but they are a pain to make if I'm busy (and with a new baby I WILL be pretty busy) and go bad so fast... and I love fruit, buy it and try to eat it all before it goes bad... I guess I should just be ok with having to go the store more often to buy fresh stuff in smaller quanities, but its such a pain! Ah, we will get there <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><br>
Thank you Becca for the cookbook I'm looking at it right now <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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They have a "contact us" part of their website. I told them they were disgusting and part of the problem not the solution. Let them know how you feel!<br><br>
Lori<br><br>
ETA: I too was raised in a home that had very unhealthy attitudes towards food. I am happy to say that my children have very healthy attitudes! We started young; I eduated myself (started in weight watchers, graduated to some nutrition courses and independent reading, as well as what was covered in nursing school), and shared my knowledge with my kids. The county extension office had a unit on fat and nutrition; the kids were amazed to see what was in some of their foods. I include the kids in meal planning; they have the responsiblity of planning and preparing two meals a week for the family (with minimal help from me). They understand it must be balanced, with a fruit and/or vegetable, protein, and complex carb (especially because we don't eat meat).<br><br>
Sometimes their dinner consists of carrot sticks, strawberries, crackers and cheese. Sometimes they get fancy and make us burritos (with beans they soaked the night before, brown rice, cheese, salsa, lettuce and tomatos).<br><br>
At 5 and 8 they know more about food and cooking than I did when I was 25. They understand that simplier is better--the closer a food is to its natural state, the healthier. My kids won't eat a school lunch; they take a lunch every day, again, even if it is only fruit, cheese and crackers. They prefer that to what the school serves.<br><br>
None of this has come easily, and it is gradual. But I am really proud of how healthy my kids are. I am slowly improving my attitude towards food and its consumption (trying not to eat while reading, on the computer, etc! and portion control! Both are my downfalls).<br><br>
Just being aware is half the battle, I think. Hang in there! It gets easier and better every day!
 

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I too contacted them to tell them how repulsive this is. This is how our adolescents become afflicted with eating disorders(well, one of the many ways at least!) and life-long unhealthy attitudes towards body image and food. It absolutely sickens me that people would try to get a "quick-fix" option for a child who is overweight. What happened to good old-fashioned healthy eating and getting some exercise????????? I am about 10 pounds overweight due to stress and lifestyle but I eat only healthy organic foods and limit my refined sugars and carbs and watch my nutritional intake. Yes, it's hard to completely keep track of the nutrients coming and going each day and trying to get enough protein and calcium and such but it's important. My daughter's health matters enough to me to continually keep track of her eating habits and her nutritional issues. This is the result of parents not paying attention to food issues and not being involved enough to say, "instead of watching tv, let;s go outside for a walk or let's play a game of soccer." Just sickening.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="dropjaw"><br>
Meg
 

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Geez, I love how their catch-phrase is, "Don't let your child become a statistic," like kids become obese all by themselves, out of the blue, for no reason.<br><br>
This is what the drug companies want: passive parents who sit back and let things happen to themselves and their kids, so that the drug companies can sweep in and rescue them. I wonder if this product has actually been tested for safe use in children.
 
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