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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone!

I have never been to this part of the forum before. We have had our sweet little kitty Myka for 5 weeks now. She is 12 weeks old. In two months we will be getting her spayed and the vet said that we can declaw her at the same time. He said that almost of of his cat clients are declawed. They also have a cat that lives at the office who is declawed.

Problem is I don't know if I want to do that. I don't want her scratching at the furniture and curtins, but I don't know if I should declaw her.

If we don't how do we train her to scratch on the post ONLY? She also has a very large cat condo which she does not scratch on, she like the furniture(sofa) better.

Can I please get your opinions, and if most of you have declawed was there a change in their personality.

thanks,
homewith1
 

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I have never declawed any of the five cats that have let me live with them and pay all their bills. You can dissuade them from scratching the furniture by using a scratching post and also physically removing them from the item they are attempting to scratch. They will permit you to somewhat retrain them.
 

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Please don't declaw your baby. It's a cruel, painful, and unnecessary procedure. It doesn't just remove the claws/nails, but takes off the first knuckle of each toe.

I had my almost 12 yr old cat declawed because I really didn't know any better at the time and was working at a vet clinic where it was done routinely
: My cat has been a biter ever since
He bites HARD too
 

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http://www.declawing.com/

Declawing is very serious, it's like amputing the first joint of all your fingers.

It can and often does lead to litter box problems (especially as kitty gets older as arthritis kicks in and the paws are abnormally painful due to their anatomical changes), results in behavioral changes, and an increased incidence of biting.

Really research this, it'll be obvious to do other stuff first. Declawing is not automatic, it's something that happens here in the US. Other countries consider it inhumane and in most it's either illegal or considered animal cruelty.
 

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Please, please, don't do it.

I thought most vets were not doing the procedure anymore, even?

CLip her nails. Get softpaws if you care a lot about your furniture (I don't-I have three kids, the cats are the least of my worries!).
 

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please don't -- we had our kitty (now 18) declawed when she was a kitten (well, my dad did, we inherited her from him) and it totally changed her personality. now she has terrible arthritis in her leg joints from having her gait altered
:
 

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With patience, you can train a cat to use the scratching post.

Don't declaw. As the other poster said, it involves cutting off the first knuckle for each claw. If you start cutting off parts of bodies, there is no telling where it might lead.

I knew a woman who declawed her cat because it was messing up her furniture. Next think you know, she's complaining that her husband was spritzing the toilet seat and that she was planning too..... well, never mind.
 

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please do not declaw your cat

There are so many alternatives. Get a scratching post and learn to clip the cat's nails. It isn't hard.

If for some reason that doesn't work, there are caps that you can put on the cat's nails.
 

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When she picks your couch over her cat tree is she scratching along the back or up the sides?

Chances are her tree doesn't go in the right direction for her preferences. Some cats prefer vertical scratching and others prefer horizonal. Either way you want to give her a surface that will let her s t r e t c h out the full length of her body (now you can see why cats love couches!).

Also, is her tree covered in carpet or sisal rope? Most cats prefer sisal rope or scratchers made of cardboard.

I agree with the pp (and with your instincts), don't declaw her. With the right training, toys and supervision you can keep her and your furniture happy.

~Julia
 

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Please please don't declaw. In addition to the all the good reasons stated above, I have heard horror stories of declawing's gone awry where the poor kitty's paws ended up seriously mutilated (even more than what declawing does.)

Also, I'm not sure if everyone will agree with this, but even if your cat is a 100% indoor cat there's always a possibility that the cat can get outside. Having claws is very important to allow your cat to defend itself against other creatures if necessary.

Finally, there are much less cruel ways to train your kitty to not claw the furniture. One very effective (although not perhaps so visually appealing
) is to place aluminum foil over whatever kitty is clawing. Cats will not claw through aluminum foil because it feels really bad on their claws. With the option of clawing your couch, carpet, etc. removed, it is easier to redirect the cat to claw on something else.
 

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Hi,
Please don't declaw. I have a 15 year old cat who I had declawed when I first got her and I have always regretted it. We added another cat about 2 years after we got her and we DID NOT declaw that cat. Scratching posts, re-direction, and even those little soft cap things can really work.
 

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Soft Paws!!!!

Also called Soft Claws, they are latex sheaths that slip over each nail. They are held on with glue and fall off as the nail naturally grows and sheds. You can find them all over the place, from Ebay to your vet's office. They are about 20 bucks (us) for a kit containing 40 nail covers, two tubes of glue, and tips that get the glue into the end of the sheath. They come in clear and many other colors.

I swear by them!!! I have had quite a few cats over the years and every one of them wears them. Being that you have a younger kitty, getting it used to the idea of being held and having their nails messed with ought to be a cinch to do. I currently have two cats wearing SoftPaws. One cat wears them on front and back feet and the other wears them on the back only. I go through a pack every other month.

Don't forget too, with a declaw you're going to STILL have to be dealing with nail cutting/softpaws as the cat will have their black claws still and the back claws can do just as much damage (if not more) as the front. Kinda' off topic, if your vet DOES offer front/back combo declaws get a new vet ASAP.

And best of all...you can get your SoftPaws in holiday colors so they can be super cool this season!!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by k9rider View Post
Please don't declaw your baby. It's a cruel, painful, and unnecessary procedure. It doesn't just remove the claws/nails, but takes off the first knuckle of each toe.(

Quote:

Originally Posted by phatchristy View Post
Declawing is very serious, it's like amputing the first joint of all your fingers.

Quote:

Originally Posted by LastBestPlace View Post
Please please don't declaw. In addition to the all the good reasons stated above, I have heard horror stories of declawing's gone awry where the poor kitty's paws ended up seriously mutilated (even more than what declawing does.)
PLEASE DO NOT DECLAW YOUR BABY!!!

There are so many other ways to keep your cat from ruining your furniture. Please do not hurt her. She's depending on you to keep her safe. Not everyone knows just what declawing does to a cat. Not every vet cares- they get more money if they declaw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have read all of your posts and all your information has been great. I was scared to post I thought I would get burned for even talking about this.

My kitty Myka will let me clip her claws very easily. She just sits there and purrs. She likes to scratch the back of the sofa and the side standing on her back paws. She also likes to jump from the floor up to the middle of my curtains, and patio door screen. Will she learn not to if I just keep taking her off?

To answer the poster above yes my Vet does offer front and back declawing and they said they only recommend declawing the front if they are an outdoor cat. She seemed put off when I said she was an indoor cat.

I am in Canada by the way and my Vet does not sell soft paws etc. We also only have a pet value store where I live and they do not sell them. I guess I will have to look on the net.

I welcome more advice and opinions, I would really like advice on how to train her to the post. Her cat condo is carpet and sisal rope, it has horizontal and vertical area. It is about 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide.

Thanks again,
homewith1

Thanks so much for all of your wonderful posts
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by homewith1 View Post
ITo answer the poster above yes my Vet does offer front and back declawing and they said they only recommend declawing the front if they are an outdoor cat.
What the (insert bad word that starts with "F" here...)?!?!?! I suggest you get a new vet. Any vet with any knowledge woukld know that especially an outdoor cat would need four sets of claws for protection and climbing if spending any time outside!!!
 

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I can not believe your vet would suggest declawing an outdoor cat at all.

may I gently suggest you look into finding another veterinarian? I would not be comfortable taking my pet to someone who showed such a grievous error in judgment.

Your kitty might like a very long scratching post - if she likes to stretch out when she scratches the side of your couch sometimes a long post is good to get her attention. my cats really like to stretch out when they scratch so it's imperative that I have an attractive post for them. I like the posts that are made of the cut edges of card board. if you can't find a post that is long enough, you can make one of 2x4 lumber cot to your desired length and wrapped with sisal rope. you can drill a hole through it and hang it on a door knob.

the best way to train her to use her post is to redirect her attention to it when you find her scratching some where you don't want her to scratch. pick her up and post her on her cat condo or the post. give her lots of praise when she scratches the post. around here, we try not to use the water gun or other methods to deter scratching. I've found they don't really work very well. I also tend to think that it confuses the cat, at least in the beginning, because it's their nature to scratch, and they don't really understand why they're being squirted for scratching the couch but not the post
 

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I have always had cats, my mother & grandmother have always had cats. We never would declaw a cat. Its all about finding something they like to claw at more then your couch


Here are some things that have worked well for me.

-if a cat likes to claw the couch put a towel or some other blanket over it until you find something else your cat likes better. its no fun to claw a loose hanging thing that can fall on you.

-many of my cats actually prefer cardboard scratch boards. this is our present favorite
http://www.petco.com/product/4476/Co...placement.aspx

-like other people suggested try sisal too, also try different angles. for example I have seen sisal scratch pads you hang on a door handle yet no cat I ever had liked those. Yet my grandmothers last cat loved his door hanging one. I have 2 cats now and one lives the sisal pad on the floor and the other could care less.

-screens are tough. we actually have a piece of clear plastic over the bottom of the screen door to keep cats & dogs from ripping the screen. they do make a pet screen which is tougher.

-cat trees are great. one of my cats prefers to claw at the rug on the cat tree. a good cat tree will last years and get constant use. they are worth investing in. Mine is 6 feet tall. It was not cheap yet after 8 years it is still in great shape and used all the time. it gives the cats a place to play and climb and a place safe from little kids & dogs.

-cat nip is also great in encouraging your cat to claw certain things
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by harleyhalfmoon View Post
What the (insert bad word that starts with "F" here...)?!?!?! I suggest you get a new vet. Any vet with any knowledge woukld know that especially an outdoor cat would need four sets of claws for protection and climbing if spending any time outside!!!
I totally agree.

I get my soft paws things online from petsmart/petco. There are lots of places that have them.
 

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Incidentally, I've never used soft paws here. You don't *have to use them* and I've had several cats. I think in the last 8 years I've been scratched once. And, that was just two weeks ago and NOT my fault. The person I got my new cat from didn't clip the nails on his front left paw and they were razor sharp.
So, he was playing with me, and just in the midst of playing I got scratched incidentally.

Needless to say, I took care of THAT right away by giving him a good clip when I discovered the issue!

But, just have a good scratching post. I had sisal. Just figure out what kind your cat likes. Some seem to really like the flat ones I find, others like ones where they can stretch out vertically and scratch.


*****

Oh, and I edited to add...my kids have NEVER been scratched btw either.
 
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