Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tell me about Vit. K. Pros and cons. Even my crunchy midwife thinks it's a good idea, so while I've nixed all the other "routine newborn procedures", I'm still undecided here. What can you all tell me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,488 Posts
NOT.<br><br>
It's linked to leukemia and you don't need it unless you are having your baby circumcised - then I don't know.<br><br><a href="http:/a/rothville.html" target="_blank"><b>Vitamin K</b></a><br><br>
DD just had a baby boy (intact) and she took alfalfa for a few weeks AFTER the baby was born.<br><br>
Besides, I have observed that Vita K makes it almost impossible to get blood from the heel for the PKU and those babies have to practically be gouged to get a few drops. But that's of course besides the point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,421 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>janellesmommy</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm sure there is a reason why all babies are born with low levels of Vitamin K. It isn't a deficiency. It is low in ALL newborns.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I concur with this. If one is planning for a low-intervention birth, i.e. forgoing an epidural and being attended by a midwife, chances are low that one will experience any of the sorts of birth "trauma" that are associated with risk for hemorrhage in the newborn (such as forceps or c-section, for example). And of course you wouldn't be circumcising. I think low vit k at birth is a non-problem. It is only perceived as a problem by the medical establishment because they have made the typical birth into a physically traumatic event for the newborn.<br><br>
I also concur with Gitti that it makes the PKU heelprick very difficult. At least that was the case for my son. I think the newborn screening is pretty important but they had the hardest time getting any blood out of him!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
There are also herbal Vit K drops that the mother can take prior to and after birth. That's what we have decided to do with this one, to avoid the issue altogether. Our MW has them, but you can also find them online. Check at birthsupplies.com and other places like that.<br><br>
Good luck!<br>
Lisa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,933 Posts
I declined them up until my homebirth turned into a forceps assisted hospital birth.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
The birth was so violent, I agreed to the Vit K only because of that. DD had some bruising on her face.<br><br>
I agree with wednesday, if your'e going to have a low/no intervention birth then there's no need for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,229 Posts
I had a homebirth and declined the Vitamin K...I did put in my birth plan that in case of a hospital transfer, if I felt the birth was traumatic enough I would use oral Vitamin K.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all your input. I think my research has led me to conclude that Vit. K is unnecessary when birth happens the way nature designed, but probably advisable when there are interventions.<br><br>
After all, nature didn't invent forceps or vacuums or internal fetal monitors to screw into babies heads - men did. So it seems reasonable that another man-made invention would be required to mitigate the negative effects of the original one.<br><br>
So, barring any unusual complications with birth, no Vit. K either!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,778 Posts
this is scary and upsetting...I had a c section so I'm assuming dd definitly had a vit k shot and that they wouldnt ask, am I right?<br><br>
they poked and poked her heel and almost sent her to the icu, its no wonder given the traumatic birth.<br><br>
this whole link between the vit k and childhood cancer has me feeling upset right at the moment <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/mecry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="crying"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
eta~<br>
dd was quite jaundiced, the article mentioned the link between a link to vit k...i'm not beating myself up or regretting...i believe things happened the way they did with us for a reason... although, I am glad to know this information now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,949 Posts
Dh and I are very torn on the vitamin K. I fully agree that babies are not born with a vitamin k "deficiency" and I expect there is a reason that babies have lower levels of vit k--we just don't know what it is.<br><br>
My midwife gave me a huge stack of articles on vitamin K, both pro and con. What I learned was the following:<br>
Although most people think that the vit K will help with "traumatic" births (circ, bruising, forceps, etc.), this is actually not what it's for. It's for spontaneous brain hemmorhage, which has no identifiable cause, affects 1 in 10,000 newborns, and is fatal. Now, 1 in 10,000 is a VERY low risk; I think it's very reasonable to decline the vitamin K with those odds. On the other hand, the odds of brain hemmorhage with the vitamin K shot are 1 in 1,000,000.<br><br>
The study on leukemia is over a decade old (I forget the name of the doctor who did it...Goddard?), has never been duplicated, and has been seriously questioned by further research, at least according to what I've read. On the other hand, there is no definitive proof either way (the numbers are too small to rule anything in or out definitely), so you need to decide if you think there's a real risk. I think it's worth tracking down both the original study and the subsequent ones that deal with it, if you really want to make an informed choice.<br><br>
My mws have been practicing for around 20 years and say that they've never had anyone have any complications from the vitamin K...and they've never had anyone have complications from NOT having it.<br><br>
ETA: I expected that "modern" delivery--forceps, vacuums, etc.--would make brain hemmorhage more likely, but I was surprised to learn that the hemmorhage risk (1 in 10,000) has been consistent for over a century (since the late 1800), since it was first studied.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,433 Posts
We did the vitamin K after our homebirth because our midwife told us that asian babies have a higher than average risk of hemmorage and we wanted to be safe.<br><br>
We did not have any problems with the heel poke because our midwife always waits until after Mama's milk comes in and baby is fully hydrated to do the blood tests. Makes sense to me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,239 Posts
We personally decided to have the vit. K because my birth was so crazy-fast that my son came out with a big gushy bruise on his head & we decided to have it done just in case there was any internal damage. His pku test went just fine, no trouble getting blood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
Iam not doing hep B but iam doing vit K I dont want to take any chances with my baby my last one came out with a cone head.lol
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,042 Posts
I allowed DD to have the Vitamin K and it was almost impossible for them to get blood out of her heal for the newborn screen. She also had jaundice and had to get heel pricks for a couple of days to monitor her levels (she looked like Big Bird) and it was hard for them to get the blood out. I'll never do Vitamin K again unless I have a really traumatic delivery. I had a c-section with her, but I don't consider that traumatic because it was planned and as easy as a surgical birth could be on both of us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,020 Posts
We declined the vitamin k. The signs of newborn hemorhaggic disease are pretty obvious and if you start to see signs of it you can always give the vit. k at that point, it wouldn't be too late.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,295 Posts
ds had his vit k (we fully vaxed until after his 6mth visit)........i'm torn on the issue like NYCveg.......the risks of the shot are rare. I'm going to have to pray over the issue with the next child and follow what god tells me to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I'm going to give dd an oral course over several weeks instead of the injection -- IF I can find oral vit K that isn't the same exact thing as what they inject.<br><br>
This is the most unbiased article I found regarding vit K. It's from a British source and also tells what they do in other countries besides the UK, and why. Very information-dense.<br><br><a href="http://www.womens-health.co.uk/vitk.asp" target="_blank">Vitamin K for Newborns: Keeping Your Baby Safe After Birth</a><br><br>
(The title doesn't look very unbiased, but the article is.)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,133 Posts
<a href="http://www.midwiferytoday.com/enews/enews0141.asp" target="_blank">http://www.midwiferytoday.com/enews/enews0141.asp</a><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Although the concentration of VK was found to be slightly higher in colostrum than mature milk, the authors point out that the total daily intake of VK in infants increases over time due to the fact that milk volume increases substantially over time.</td>
</tr></table></div>

<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">a good teaching tool would include potential concerns for infants receiving VK injections. Davis's Drug Guide for Nurses states the general side effects of phytonadione ( vitamin K1) one milligram include jaundice, hemolytic anemia, flushing, rash urticaria, or a mild local reaction at the injection site. In addition any foreign entity given by injection can cause an anaphylactic reaction.</td>
</tr></table></div>
VK deficiency is a disorder that is not always apparent until days or over a week later. One injection at birth does not 'cure' the deficiency, even in exclusively breastfed infants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MamaInTheBoonies</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><a href="http://www.midwiferytoday.com/enews/enews0141.asp" target="_blank">http://www.midwiferytoday.com/enews/enews0141.asp</a><br></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
That site states this:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Phytonadione is not absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract unless there are some bile salts present.</td>
</tr></table></div>
What does that mean? Can newborns not absorb any vit K at first anyway if they are being given oral vit K?
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top