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A vent about what I thought I was getting into. I am going to take you back 4 years. Caden was in kindy at a local public school. We weren't disappointed in it but I really wanted him to have a Montessori education. I found out that we had a Montessori Charter school so I jumped on it. I put our name in the box for the draw. We got in. I was so excited!!!!! That following year was GREAT! We had an awesome Directress, Wonderful families, and great teachers. I couldn't have been happier. Our Directress left the school and we got a new Administrator. A man, from a public school environment. Things have changed over the last two years and he has even admitted to parents that we will be changing curriculum next year and being using one that mimics the public school system in the area. I am very disappointed.<br><br>
There is more to this.... Caden in his second year at the school was having issues with his reading and was testing a year behind. I wanted to nip this in the bud early, so I agree to an IEP and putting him in learning support for reading. Here we are e year later and still behind a year and still has an IEP. He hates the work. Its boring to him. He is not at a Dick and Jane level intellectually. He has issues decoding words, not comprehending what the text is about. Therefore could they not help him with decoding with things that are of interest to him. We just are not seeing eye to eye and I am pulling him out and working on his issues at home myself. What do I do next? Send him to a public school and get the same results? I do not have the ability to homeschool, I wish I could but with Isaiah and my lack of patience it wouldnt work. I am looking into a local private school but unless we can get a scholarship it wont happen.<br><br>
So I am researching as much as I can to gain amo for my meeting with his teachers and principle. I need as much as I can to show them why they should and should not be doing, what is and what is not montessori. If anyone has anything I can use please send it my way. I really need to focus on what I am going to say to them. Also any quesitons you would present to them if you were in my shoes. TIA so so so much mamas!<br><br>
I want his school to thrive in a Montessori fashion. I am the President of the PTO for Godsake. I should be able to say good things about my sons school but it gets harder everyday.
 

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Unless the board that runs the school is a PARENT and TEACHER led board, it doesn't matter how impassioned of a plea you make, how educated you and the other parents are about Montessori and why you chose it for your kid, or even how many experts you bring in. If the board is "Corporate Volunteers" or a bunch of business dollar-eyed toadies, they can and will change your previously wonderful true Montessori school (probably started by PARENTS) into a crappy test prep factory. Why?<br><br>
1. Cheaper for them to get 22 year old recent college grads, pay them $20,000 a year, and get crappy workbooks (at about $150.oo per student) than invest the $35,000 plus for salary for a Montessori trained elementrary director/directress, plus $15,000 for the assistant, plus $50,000 for their benefits, plus at least $30,000 in start-up equipment for a Montessori classroom and another $5000-$10,000 per year to replace materials and add to the starter set. Do the math: here in Ohio, the state gives about $5800 per student to charter schools In a Montessori class, there are usually 30 kids (=$174,000 per year). To fund a great montessori class, it will cost the school at least $130,000 the first year, and $110,000 each year thereafter. The rest would cover rent, utilities, secretaries, cleaning, etc. In a crappy test-prep school, the start up costs are about $65,000 the first year, and about $60,000 thereafter. Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. And since most of these "boards" are NOT made up of parents and teachers, they become PAID boards that pay themselves to attend each meeting as well as give themselves and their fat cat buddies lucrative contracts, while the kids whose parents THOUGHT they were getting a cool alternative, pro-child choice for school end up instead with a dingy, overcrowded, boring, uninspiring, JOKE of a school/classroom led by a totally green and underprepared and TOTALLY unsupervised 22 year old (with NO kids, and who read like MAYBE 1 chapter about Montessori in their intro and overview to educational theories class).<br><br>
Now, I am sure there are at least one or two authentic Montessori charter schools out there, but VERY few, and they only stay authentic when they stay very small and keep parent and teacher led boards and KEEP OUT THE BUSINESSMEN.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>nkm1968</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9914474"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Unless the board that runs the school is a PARENT and TEACHER led board, it doesn't matter how impassioned of a plea you make, how educated you and the other parents are about Montessori and why you chose it for your kid, or even how many experts you bring in. If the board is "Corporate Volunteers" or a bunch of business dollar-eyed toadies, they can and will change your previously wonderful true Montessori school (probably started by PARENTS) into a crappy test prep factory. Why?<br><br>
1. Cheaper for them to get 22 year old recent college grads, pay them $20,000 a year, and get crappy workbooks (at about $150.oo per student) than invest the $35,000 plus for salary for a Montessori trained elementrary director/directress, plus $15,000 for the assistant, plus $50,000 for their benefits, plus at least $30,000 in start-up equipment for a Montessori classroom and another $5000-$10,000 per year to replace materials and add to the starter set. Do the math: here in Ohio, the state gives about $5800 per student to charter schools In a Montessori class, there are usually 30 kids (=$174,000 per year). To fund a great montessori class, it will cost the school at least $130,000 the first year, and $110,000 each year thereafter. The rest would cover rent, utilities, secretaries, cleaning, etc. In a crappy test-prep school, the start up costs are about $65,000 the first year, and about $60,000 thereafter. Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. And since most of these "boards" are NOT made up of parents and teachers, they become PAID boards that pay themselves to attend each meeting as well as give themselves and their fat cat buddies lucrative contracts, while the kids whose parents THOUGHT they were getting a cool alternative, pro-child choice for school end up instead with a dingy, overcrowded, boring, uninspiring, JOKE of a school/classroom led by a totally green and underprepared and TOTALLY unsupervised 22 year old (with NO kids, and who read like MAYBE 1 chapter about Montessori in their intro and overview to educational theories class).<br><br>
Now, I am sure there are at least one or two authentic Montessori charter schools out there, but VERY few, and they only stay authentic when they stay very small and keep parent and teacher led boards and KEEP OUT THE BUSINESSMEN.</div>
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No ours is parent lead. any suggestions?
 

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then I would recommend ordering the following book by Donna Goetz Bryant, "Children Who Are Not yet Peaceful: Assimilation in the Early Elementary Environment" and read it, and order a copy for every teacher and administrator at the school, as this book has a master Montessori educator advocating AGAINST tutoring of children, AGAINST labeling kids as "behind" or "disabled", or needing "medication" or other special services. This is my all time favorite book about REAL Montessori, I like it even better than the Montessori: The Science behind The genius book by Angeline Lillard.
 
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