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We have been dealing with some complicated issues recently, including a CPS scare and lots of bureaucracy because of my UC. It is all over now, but now my three year old DD screams bloody murder every time someone is at the door, even if I tell her someone will be coming beforehand. Just now, the doorbell rang and we weren't expecting anyone. My DD SCREAMED and was clinging to me like her life depended on it. She then started saying "Mama protect Kaya" over and over again. Apparently, the whole experience was traumatizing to her. I didn't realize that she was so affected by the whole episode, and I feel really guilty. Any ideas how I can help her let go of these fears? I am so sorry my baby is so scared <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">.
 

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Disarm the doorbell?<br><br>
Keep her playroom in another part of the house.. not so near the door?<br><br>
Have friendly folks come and use the door?<br><br>
Role play greeting folks at the door?<br><br>
Just some thoughts. And if it is any consolation... kids generally "grow out" of these episodes. Sorry for your recent troubles.
 

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Thanks, I like the role playing idea. I'll have her ring the doorbell a couple times as well <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">. Hope it helps.
 

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Poor baby and mommy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Yes, try the role-playing!
 

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I had a foster daughter who would scream whenever a person in uniform came into the room/house do to her removal experience. fortunately, the caseworker told me of this fear because we were at my brother's house one day when my sil's friend came over who was a corrections officer. I explained why the child was reacting and she understood and luckily had a shirt with her that she put over her uniform shirt. Then i opened the door again and the friend greeted DD gently and she calmed.<br><br>
I would start with putting up a sign that asks people to knock gently or ask friends to call on their cell phone as they arrive, that way they would not have to ring the bell. Then you could have friends/relatives come by and ring the bell at pre-established times with some kind of gift, toy, treat, etc until the baby associates the bell with good things. If this works, then you could begin to do intermittent bells with hugs, excitement, etc. I would also continue to let her know a visitor will be coming and who it is. Talk to her about a friend coming to visit, have her with you as you answer the door with "who is it? etc", so that she can be comforted and feel protected in your arms as you open the door. It will get better with time.
 

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Oh, poor little girl. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
Definitely role play, have her play w/ the door bell, and talk a lot.<br><br>
And congrats for your UC! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">: I was concerned a bit, too, when we had ours in 2007, but there have been no issues at all. I hope yours resolve very soon, if they haven't already!
 
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