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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My DS is just almost 13 months. He's super smart (of course I think so!), and he really is starting to seem to understand what we're saying, especially if we ask him to do something ("Come to mama," "Oh, give that here," etc, he'll do what we ask most of the time). The last few days, he's really starting to nod or shake his head when I ask him a yes/no question ("Do you want to go?" or something like that).<br><br>
But then again, I'm afraid it's just all in my head! Is he old enough to really understand the things I'm saying? And especially to give answers? He's been shaking and nodding his head for a few months now, of course, but it's just recently that he seems to be doing it on purpose when I ask a question. And I'd swear sometimes he says "yeah" too when I ask him things. Or "go" when I ask if he wants to go (which I'm sure is just repetition, though).<br><br>
So is this really understanding or just coincidences? How old were your toddlers when they started to really respond to requests and questions by either doing something or giving an "answer"? TIA!
 

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my 15 mo dd has been speaking is short two or three word sentances for a month, spoke her first word9meaning the word had a eaning and not just a sound) at 7 months. started to understand and obey drections at 10 mnths and at a year was able to answer yes or no questions correctly.<br>
my dd now has a vocab of over 130 words(well i lost count at 130 a month ago) and is continuing to learn at least 10 new words a week and a new sign or two a week.<br>
some kids just have the capacity for language and "get it" early. while others dont.<br>
heck mama, dont worry, if he is early, rejoice in knowing you dont have the struggles other mommies of toddlers have that dont understand yet.<br>
thats just my $0.02
 

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my dd started talking and walking at about 9 months. i have a video of her at 10 months, nodding "yes" to questions from my parents. my boys all took longer... every kid is different! enjoy your little communicator!<br><br>
katje
 

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I think this is exactly what you would expect at this age. My kids usually had a handful of words at 1 year and could follow simple directions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, mamas! It's good to know that he's probably meaning it. I was just thinking maybe I was reading more into it than was there because, well, you know we mamas like to believe our little ones are geniuses <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
It's just sorta sad because I know way too many kids whose parents never really talk to them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> So I'm not really used to a child his age really having verbal skills, because others' kids haven't had a chance to practice, kwim?<br><br>
Thanks for the replies!
 

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My DD is almost 14 months, and in the last three months I have been ASTONISHED at how much she understands. It's reassuring, actually, because she only has two or three words, and was a late, late babbler, so her language development worries me.<br><br>
I'll mention casually to DH that I'm going outside for a minute, and will be right back, and lo and behold there's DD standing by the door with her shoes in hand. Or I'll say to my mom, oh I'm going to go start dinner, and DD is standing by her highchair yammering to get in there and eat. As near as I can tell, she understands almost everything I say about common, everyday things, and she'll nod yes or say "nananana" for no. I've even started using "code" to keep her from understanding things I'd rather she didn't hear, like "the yellow box" for "Cheerios." If she hears me say that, she starts banging on the pantry door and demanding Cheerios.<br><br>
I can say to her "go get the..." or "give that to..." and she can do it, and she knows the names of clothing items, the foods she eats, her body parts, etc.<br><br>
So yeah, I think you're not imagining it and your toddler is right on target!!!!
 

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At 9 months, my DD would turn the page of a board book if you said "Turn the page." She first pointed to a specific thing I asked about in a book at 9 1/2 months. By 11 months, she could point to various body parts, put something in or on something else when we asked her to (e.g. "put the sock on your head"), hug on request, etc. Around 13 1/2 months, she started saying "nah" sometimes for "no" and nodding her head for "yes," and I also recorded that she followed a two-step direction for what I thought was the first time: "Can you pick up the magnet and put it on the refrigerator?"<br><br>
So I'd say, sure, your DS really understands you and can answer questions!
 

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My DD was always ahead with her language skills- at a year she spoke in short sentence and had excellent comprehension well before that. She really had exceptional skills in those areas (and lacked and still lacks skills in other areas). My more well rounded DS, now 15 months, has lots of words and signs- but never uses them in combination. Single words and gestures are his primary communication, but he understands tons and will follow two part directions like “Go and get the toy and take it to daddy” (of course he has to be in a directions following mood).He also reacts to things we say in his presence that are not directed at him. Like we will talk about whether or not the kids should take a bath and he shakes his head NO. It is amazing how much he can understand without being able to communicate back very much at all. I think it is very age appropriate.
 

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I think all kids have opinions quite early on. The difference seems to be when they "get" how to express those opinions, through nodding or with words. I think it's great that you're so receptive. It will probably make him feel a little less frustrated to see that you understand him.
 

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Hi,<br>
I agreew ith everyone...lol I wanted to mention an idea I heard once related to this. The suggestion was to be specific when giving directions to your child or asking them soemthing. For examply instead of saying "bring that to me" you would say"bring me the red ball" that way you are encouraging them to build their vocabulary.
 

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My dd is 13 mo and we've been noticing the same things. She's definitly understanding what going on & is sort of miffed that she can't communicate better yet.<br><br>
Today at lunch for example, she was in the highchair eating french toast. Next thing I know she's waving her arms around like she's trying to say "all done". So I'm like, OK you're done, let's get you out of the chair. Started to take the tray off & she let out one of those ear piercing screeches. Obviously *did not* want to get out of the chair. After a minute or so of guessing games turns out she wanted her drink. She doesn't sign drink yet though, so I guess what she was trying to say was "I'm done with this & want that instead." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nut.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nut"><br><br>
Holly
 
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