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for the past week my 14month son slept all night being brestfed. when i would latch him off he would start wailing. i tried cio but it just got out hand.<br>
Have any of y'all been through this? advice please! thanks<br><br><br><br><br>
Love my Saha <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/toddler.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="toddler">:
 

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Is he teething? Getting new teeth does all sorts of wacky things to our little ones. This past week DS is getting 2 teeth. One day he nursed at least every hour, a couple hours he nursed 3 - 4 times. The next day he went 16 hours with out nursing, when I offered he got mad that I would even suggest it. The pressure may feel good on his gums.
 

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You may try some teething remedies if you think that might be part of the problem, and it may also help you to do the "Pantley Pull-Off" which is a method of unlatching a sleeping baby without waking them. It has worked so well for us that my ds now unlatches voluntarily when I touch his lip. Here's a description of the same method from a great article at ProMom -<br><br>
"As it turned out, learning to delatch him became my biggest breastfeeding challenge. Because he would sleep for hours, nipple in mouth, latched on tight as a tick, I suffered from back pain and sleep loss, despite a trusty pillow wedged against my back. Then, an LLL leader told me about using my index and middle finger to "fool" him into thinking the nipple was still there. It's a neat trick, requiring a little practice. With the index finger, you relax the suction and gently ease the nipple out of the relaxed, sleeping mouth. As it's coming out, you put your middle finger under their chin to keep some of the comforting suction and pressure "in place." "<br><a href="http://www.promom.org/bf_info/jaycox.htm" target="_blank">http://www.promom.org/bf_info/jaycox.htm</a><br><br>
At first it may take several tries to get them to let go, just be patient and try again after a moment. Ds learned to let go on the first try after a few weeks. Once in a while he'll insist on going longer and root back on when I try to unlatch him, but he'll always come off by the third try and without any crying or waking enough to bother him.
 

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I am tandem nursing and deal with a lot of night nursing here. More that I would like, for sure. I do think the Pantley pull-off technique does help. It takes a lot of patience, for sure, but it is so nice when it finally clicks.<br><br>
I hear you on the cry-it-out. I tried it once, (not with ds alone, but with dh holding him, in another bed) and after three hours of almost non-stop crying, I decided it was not worth it.<br><br>
Hugs to you mama, I know it is rough. I just keep telling myself, "he will not be doing this when he is 16." !
 
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