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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Should I pinch off flowers if my plant is very small? It's not even 2' tall yet and has at least one flower. It seemed early (I'm in zone 7a) but I'm a newbie, so unsure. I think the plant probably needs more growth before fruiting(?) It's a beefsteak style - or big boy? Something like that, lol. Thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I read that you should shake(gently) the plant to ensure proper pollen distribution and more even tomato growth. DONT pinch off the flowers!
 

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If there arn't very many other flowers around, it might not even set fruit. I'd leave the flower alone. If it sets fruit, no worries! Those indeterminate plants will still grow even with fruit on them.
 

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When mine are very small and mid-transplant I pinch any off, but at 2' you are good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the tips - I guess I should NOT pinch off the flowers <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> interesting re: gently shaking the plant... I love learning about gardneing - thanks again!
 

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I was considering a strategy for my own tomatoes that are also getting ahead of themselves. What about fertilizing a little extra with nitrogen heavy short term stuff like fish emulsion until they're really grown enough to focus on fruit?
 

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I was just in a veggie gardening class this morning. Our instructor spent quite a bit of time on tomatoes. She recommended cutting/clipping/pinching flowers until the plant looks full, then stop doing that. If it starts thinning out after it has reached the appropriate height/fullness for its variety, then use a high nitrogen organic food/fertilizer (first number is nitrogen) for a few feedings. Then, switch to the fruit-enhancing organic fertilizer. The exact times for doing these really depend on the variety and other conditions. A local nursery can help with these nuances.
 
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