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I have tons of tomato plants that I did not plant this year. Only thing I can think of since I did pull the plants is they are from toms that fell to the ground I just covered in dirt. It was very very cold this winter and very very snowy.<br>
I will do the same thing this summer and see if I have some more next year.
 

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Tomatoes are perennial in really warm climates. It means that the plant will die down to the ground in winter but regrow (from the same plant) the following spring.<br><br>
In your case it was new plants growing from seed which any plant will do, perennial or not.<br><br>
oh and if your original plant was a hybrid, your new from seed plants won't likely produce edible tomatoes.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>limette</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11623784"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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oh and if your original plant was a hybrid, your new from seed plants won't likely produce edible tomatoes.</div>
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The fruit from a volunteer hybrid will be edible, it just won't taste or look exactly like the original. If it was open pollinated, it will be the same as the parent. Good luck! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I had this happen to me. I planted plum tomatoes at a house one summer. Left the plants there to rot and next summer the whole garden was full of plum tomatoes. I didn't live there anymore but I took the tomatoes and made one huge sauce meal for a whole lot of people!<br><br>
I love when things like that happen!<br><br>
This year we have a blackberry bush and we have no clue where it came from and pumkin plants scattered around the yard.
 

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This happens every year to me! It's kind of an unexpected surprise. I love finding new things I didn't plant. They more than likely came up from seeds of the tomatoes that fell as the pp's have stated. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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I bring tomato and pepper plants inside each fall, and they continue producing indoors for up to three years! And this is in Alaska with only a wood stove for heat and no artificial light. We literally eat fresh toms+peps year round.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>limette</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11623784"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Tomatoes are perennial in really warm climates. It means that the plant will die down to the ground in winter but regrow (from the same plant) the following spring.<br><br>
In your case it was new plants growing from seed which any plant will do, perennial or not.<br><br>
oh and if your original plant was a hybrid, your new from seed plants won't likely produce edible tomatoes.</div>
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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mtn.mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11630992"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I bring tomato and pepper plants inside each fall, and they continue producing indoors for up to three years! And this is in Alaska with only a wood stove for heat and no artificial light. We literally eat fresh toms+peps year round.</div>
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That's cool. If I had any in pots I would bring one in.
 
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