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hi, my 10 month old daugher was born with a very short frenulum also known as being "tongue tied". It did not affect her ability to nurse. Recently the frenulum has gotten a small tear on it. We saw the pediatrician today for a well baby visit and she confirmed that it is indeed "a small tear". She said we could have the frenulum clipped but it was up to our discretion. I asked if it was likely that these tears would happen frequently and become infected - she said "not very likely". She recommended waiting until Sophia starts speaking to find out if any speech problems develop.

So, just want to know if any of you mamas have had a tongue-tied baby with speech problems or without. Should I be concerned? Would it be better to clip now? I do not want to risk my breastfeeding relationship at all and I worry that the clipping might confuse her latch. I am inclined to wait and see, I just want to hear other's experience.

thanks, pauline
 

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My tongue-tied baby had a frenulectomy at 4 weeks because it severely impacted our nursing relationship (pain and milk transfer problems). If not for nursing problems, I think I would have left it alone. In your case, it sounds like the natural process of loosening over time is happening, and I would wait and see how things develop. One thing I was told over and over was that they only like to treat if there is a current problem, not in anticipation of future problems. They did say my daughter's case would most likely affect speech and eating lumpy food, but that wasn't the reason we chose to treat it at the time, obviously.

Oh, and I had a tight upper frenulum that ripped naturally when I was a few years old, and it was no big deal.
 

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If a tight frenulum does not impact nursing there is no reason to clip it at this point. That is...unless you can find a doctor that will clip it without the use of anesthesia and a hospital stay (I don't remember the age it turns from a quick outpatient procedure to a serious inpatient operation). It might break on it's own, as it is already tearing. As for speech impediments, about 1 out of 20 people are born with tongue ties, and not nearly that many people have speech impediments. Most tongue ties resolve on their own by stretching or breaking. Since your babe had no problem nursing, her tie must be very small. Good luck in your decision! My son had a pretty serious tongue tie that we clipped when he was 2 days old, as he could not nurse, now he has no issues with it!
 

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Sophia's tongue tie is pretty significant. I was (and still am) amazed that she does so wonderfully nursing. Probably because of her most excellent mama


Really, I'm just giving this thread a
for you Pauline.
 

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I don't have any experience in your case, but ds2 had a significant tongue tie that put our nursing relationship in jeopardy, so it was clipped. Being in that situation, if it wouldn't have intervened, I would have definitely chosen to wait it out.

Perhaps you could ask the dr what the difference would be (anethesia, length of time in hospital, etc) if you chose to do it now or if it were required in 1 yr? It may be a less involved procedure at a young age?

Ds2's was clipped at 2 days old there weren't any complications at all.
 

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I don't have any advice but I just wanted to let you know that my 6 day old has a short frenulum and it doesn't affect his nursing either. I will be watching this thread to see what happens.

Chelci
 

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My ds and I were both born tongue tied. It caused me to have a severe speech imbetament. The lactation nurse was the first to notice it in the hospital when ds couldnt latch on correctly. The ENT came to my hospital room and then took him to the children's hospital to snip it. I was worried cause ds didnt get anything snipped at the hospital and I didnt want to do it but I thought it would be best. The lactation nurse said he wouldnt be able to latch correctly if it wasnt done and knowing all the therapy I went through for my speech problem, we just thought it would be best. We wouldnt have noticed it if we werent bf'ing. I'm very happy they got it early. The ENT said that there isnt any nerves going through it so early (ds was 2days old) and ds didnt seem upset about it. I think he and I had a more severe case though cause his tongue didnt reach past his gums. Now he sticks his tongue out at me all the time.

Its up to you. I just wanted to let you know what I decided to do.
 

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We had ds's frenulum clipped at 11 days b/c I was in major pain (we thought he transfered milk ok, but I couldn't take it...he then started gaining 1 pound per week for a while, so maybe it was impacting his transfer
)

Anyhow, a short frenulum often runs in families as was the case with us - both my sister and I are tongue tied. My mom had very painful nursing experiences and just nursed through the first two months of owww b/c she didn't know there was an relationship between tt and bf. Our family doc opted not to cut mine as I got older b/c it had no impact on my speech.

However, our pediatric dentist released mine when I was 5 or 6 because it was tied so high on the backside of my gum that it was impacting my lower teeth/jaw development. It was a simple procedure - numbed with lidocaine and snip. I remember it clearly and it just wasn't a big deal. I don't know if my sister's was ever released.

There's no magic age that it becomes a major procedure, though there are varying degrees of the procedure. The simple snip with or without numbing is a frenotomy - most common. If part of the frenulum is removed it's a frenectomy. Frenuloplasty is actual reconstruction (I'm not clear on the indications for this), which *is* much more involved.

The consensus seems to be leave it unless there is a clear indication not to. At which time it can be dealt with simply. HTH!
 

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I had three tongue tied kids and 2 are still tongue tied. None of them had nursing issues, W's tongue was clipped when she had her tubes put in, because she was having speech issues.

K's tongue is still quite tt but his speech is clear and so I won't get his clipped. And S is very tt but she nurses well so that's where she's at right now.

My dr (very crunchy) told me that it might tear eventually or it might not, but that's all we had to worry about.

FWIW I am still tt, and trust me, I speak very well.
 

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This is a dentist's website with information about tongue-tie. It has two slideshows over on the left: Frenulums, and Breastfeeding and Frenulums.

I don't know what I'd do in your situation... I am absolutely loathe to do anything when there's not a current problem.... but on the other hand, I might not know if there was a problem until it had been present for awhile and harder to correct. Kids don't have perfect pronunciation when they first begin to speak. So odd speech wouldn't be attributed to tt, until a certain point, and then the child has already developed a speech pattern and has to work to change that. Plus I have a thing for nice straight teeth and I'd hate for a tt to mess with that!
Like a PP said, in addition to the possibility of speech problems, tongue-tie can impact the placement of the teeth.

My son also had tt. So did his father's brother and nephew, and they needed speech therapy. I clipped his lower one myself when he was less than 2 weeks old. His upper one may impact him too- it starts really low on his top lip and goes between his two front teeth, a little chunk of meat making a space.
So even though I clipped the bottom one to improve his latch (it sure did!!), I don't think there's anything I can do about where the other frenulum is connected on his gums. He still has the cutest little smile in the world.
 
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