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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I meant to get my SFG started earlier, but we had a very cool start to the summer and I kept putting it off. I'd love to do strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, green beans, tomatoes, green peppers, maybe garlic or onions. Is there any hope for any of these this late?
 

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I think it's too late for garlic/onions, but you can transplant chives anytime (as an onion alternative). Probably also too late for tomatoes and peppers - they need an early start.<br><br>
Plant garlic in the fall (October) for July harvest next year. Onions, start as soon as the ground can be worked - they do all their significant growing between planting and the summer solstice (June 21st), so they need as much time as possible in that timeframe to develop fully.<br><br>
Tomatoes and peppers need to be started indoors or bought as greenhouse starts and then planted as soon as it warms up after the last frost date. Here, I think it's best to plant them on or about 2 weeks after that date, to be safe. They need a long head start and lots of warmth and sun. I think zone 4 would be challenging for tomatoes and peppers, though not impossible. If you can get short-season varieties, that's best. And if you can locate them in the sunniest spot in your yard, preferable with southern exposure, they'll do best.<br><br>
It is probably fine to start greenbeans now. Also, if you have a spot that doesn't get too much sun, you can try planting broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and peas for fall harvesting. Kale is also a good (and super easy-to-grow) bet for fall, and you could plant spinach and lettuce (again, in a relatively cool spot). I think technically it's best to wait until mid-July to start fall plantings, but I doubt there is harm in starting them now. It's worth experimenting, IMO!<br><br>
The berries you mention are all going to take more than one year to get settled and start bearing. I think you can transplant blueberries and raspberries anytime, but cut off any flowers or unripe berries the first year so they put their energy into good root-building. Transplanting is stressful and it's better to prevent them from bearing so they can heal. Next year you'll likely have berries.<br><br>
Strawberries, I don't know. It's strawberry season where I am (Zone 5) and I imagine you're too late for it in your zone. Spring is the time to transplant strawberries. But check with your local master gardener hotline - they might know more about when to start strawberries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you! I think I'll stop by my local nursery and see what they have so I can get something in this year.
 
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