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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

My ds is one year old and he is a genius, lol. Well, he is to me.

This is his second week at preschool and he is doing great. No tears from day one.
(he was with a nanny til now)

I want to learn ways to complement his education at home. I only play silly games with him like hide and seek, dance and tickle tickle.
:

I believe fun is first at this age and I am very free spirited. But I think with some resources I can use the games to teach him something along the way.

My main interests are communication, world discovery and emotional intelligence.
I am teaching him signs, although I am the only one doing it. He pays a lot of attention and recently started doing the one for "more". He does "give me five" and "bye-bye" and of course "no". (maybe he does more, but I haven't noticed)


And I help him trough high emotions, etc etc.
As a single mom and full time worker I find that weeks are passing by and I am still not doing any educational or enrichment activities at home.

Can you help me with some easy to use resources? Or ideas?

I welcome book recommendations but if you can give me like a top 10 ideas I would really appreciate it.

Thank you very much!
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This is an interesting idea. Here is what I can come up with:

1. let him touch everything - when you go outside, let him crunch leaves in his hand and squish the grass in his toes.

2. give everything a name - going to grocery store or taking a walk are instantly learning experiences simply by pointing out naming the things you see.

3. encourage a love a music - sing songs, play music on the stereo, dance with your baby

4. provide him with tools, then step back - give him wooden blocks, a bowl with water and a clean sponge, nesting cups, etc. and let him go at them in his own way.

5. never underestimate him - for example, most people assume that toddlers need sippy cups because they are uncoordinated. Show your baby how to hold a real cup and give them the opportunity to make mistakes and learn from them. A toddler can wipe up spilled water with a towel and learn cause and effect this way too.

6. let them make art - toddlers love finger painting, coloring with big crayons and markers, and playing with dough.

7. read - many toddlers don't have the attention span to read a story linearly. Even if your child turns the pages while you read and wants to jump around in the book, you can still tell a story as you go or point to the pictures and give them names.

8. ask questions - even if your toddler can't respond, they may very well understand. Ask your toddler questions about how they feel, what they see, what they want, what their opinion is.

9. don't hover - give your toddler space to explore on their own without your guidance. Let them learn that if they crawl under the table and stand up, they will bump their head. Let them play their own way at the park (safely, of course) without you telling them what they do.

10. beware of praise - praise can motivate a child to do something for the wrong reason (to please someone else). Encourage them by telling them they are doing good work and when you see them have pride in something they have done, confirm it by being specific with (you built that tower out of blocks! vs. Good job!!)
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NewMom0208 View Post
Hello!

I only play silly games with him like hide and seek, dance and tickle tickle.
:

As a single mom and full time worker I find that weeks are passing by and I am still not doing any educational or enrichment activities at home.

First, I'd say that games like hide and seek, dance and tickle tickle ARE educational at this stage. He's learning object permanence, motor skills, music, relationship formation...all sorts of things.

I wouldn't be too concerned about "academics" - that will come along.

But in the meantime -

1. Take him for a daily walk and talk about the things he notices. Why do birds fly and bugs crawl?

2. Get him his own public library card, and go often. Yes, I know he is a toddler, but he'll need his own card soon enough.

3. Cook together. At first, maybe he will only make a mess with the muffin batter or decorating cookies or putting sliced vegetables on a plate. But soon enough, he can tear up the lettuce for the salad and measure out the ingredients for a casserole. Show him that four 1/4 cups is the same as 1 cup, or divide one lump of bread dough into halves to make 2 loaves.

4. Travel as much as you can. Daytrips to historic sites, longer trips to natural features (mountains, ocean, desert)...whatever you can afford in terms of money and time.

5. Follow his interests - if he loves dinosaurs or birds or cars, explore them and learn about them together.

6. Teach him independence as he grows (obviously, this is one for the future) - especially how to dress himself. It drives me crazy to see kindergarten age children who can't put on their own coats and shoes.

7. Get him a subscription to a children's magazine. Again, perhaps more appropriate in a year or 2, but he will love the bright picture, and they often have great activity and craft suggestions.

8. Do crafts together. Teach him to knit (great for boys and girls!)

9. Do sports together - physical activity is important.

10. Read. Read. Read. Books, magazines, cereal boxes, signs in stores, traffic signs....

A couple of books I like:

http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Famil.../dp/1590304713

http://www.amazon.com/Teach-Me-Mysel...165598&sr=1-10
 

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My number one enrichment activity from the time the kids were toddlers is a weekly trip to the public library. We get a tote bag full of books, most of them picked out by the kids. We read them together or individually as age, interest and ability allow.

I don't buy into the "just right" book philosophy at all. Any book the kid shows interest in is "just right" for our purposes. If it's too hard, I read it. If it's too easy, it doesn't hurt the child to read it and will improve their fluency.

Fostering a passion for reading is all I care about, and it has worked well with my children.
 

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Huh? He's one. Just play. Let him play. Play along with him. Blocks are super educational. Coloring, singing and dancing, things we think of as goofy and fun, are actually brainbuilding.

Don't stress about academics. Don't worry about how many words or signs he has. It'll all come along, especially when he's surrounded by other kids all day.
 

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1. Putting things into other things - like poker chips into a coffee can with a slit cut into a lid. Do this with supervision.

2. Count things.

3. All kinds of block play, regular blocks, chunky legos, lincoln logs and tinkertoys (when he's old enough).

4. Fine motor activities like stringing large beads onto string, painting on an easel.

5. Get outside and look for bugs, dig in the dirt. Collect pinecones, acorns, leaves.

6. Sensory/texture play - Supervised: play with sand, water, beans/rice and toys, fingerpaints, shaving cream and food coloring on a tray or pudding so he can eat it. Draw shapes and letters into the shaving cream or pudding. Make swatches of different textured fabrics.

7. Sort things:

by shape, color, size, blocks vs. trucks, anything like that.

8. Visit all the parks around your area.

9. Listen to kids cds in the car.

10. Play with your child - play pirates, superheros, restaurant, store etc.

11. Play games outside like red-light green light or bean bag toss, Simon says.

12. Do felt board stories and fingerplay or stories with puppets.

13. Work on throwing and catching things - balls or bean bags.

If this isn't enough, here's more:

Discovery bottles http://growinginpeace.wordpress.com/...overy-bottles/

http://growinginpeace.wordpress.com/...er-activities/

http://growinginpeace.wordpress.com/...ri-activities/
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is great! Thank you very much!

ok, I have another one for you. Although maybe I just have to wait.
Sometimes I need to get things off his hands for safety or property reasons (a pen, my car keys, somebody else's purse) This, I just do, and, when the tantrum starts I just say "I know you are frustrating, it is a drag, but you can hurt yourself, that is that lady's purse", etc)

Now, other times I just want to take something from his hand to show him a variation of use that might be more fun. As soon as I just touch the object on his hand, he tightens the fist and start complaining...If I insist I get full force cry. (he is one year old). Any way I can get him to hand me things and trusting he is getting it back or I am asking for too much and I shoud just let him be?
 

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There are some really great ideas on this thread. One year olds can do so many fun things. These two family games were a big hit with my son when he was one:

1. Star Search-- I cut out three stars from bright yellow paper, about the size of my hand, and laminated them. Then DS would go into his room with DH while I taped them all around the livingroom/kitchen, and I would say, "OK, time to find those stars!" And he would come toddling out to look for them. Then we would trade and he would hide the stars (with DH). He LOVED this game and it was great for building skills, too.

2. Silly Circle-- This was a hula hoop placed on the floor, which we would all stand around. We taked turns hopping into the hula hoop and doing something silly. It was really a nice way to learn concepts of turn taking and "self control", being silly one minute and stopping when you hop out of the circle. Plus it was just fun and funny to see.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NewMom0208 View Post
This is great! Thank you very much!

ok, I have another one for you. Although maybe I just have to wait.
Sometimes I need to get things off his hands for safety or property reasons (a pen, my car keys, somebody else's purse) This, I just do, and, when the tantrum starts I just say "I know you are frustrating, it is a drag, but you can hurt yourself, that is that lady's purse", etc)

Now, other times I just want to take something from his hand to show him a variation of use that might be more fun. As soon as I just touch the object on his hand, he tightens the fist and start complaining...If I insist I get full force cry. (he is one year old). Any way I can get him to hand me things and trusting he is getting it back or I am asking for too much and I shoud just let him be?
Have you heard of the toddler rules of possession?

1. If I like it, it's mine.
2. If it's in my hand, it's mine.
3. If I can take it from you, it's mine.
4. If I had it a little while ago, it's mine.
5. If it's mine, it must NEVER appear to be yours in any way.
6. If I'm doing or building something, all the pieces are mine.
7. If it looks just like mine, it is mine.
8. If I saw it first, it's mine.
9. If you are playing with something and you put it down, it automatically becomes mine.
10. If it's broken, it's yours.

You might have to just wait it out. Keep things he's not supposed to have out of reach. If it's dangerous to play with, take it away even if he cries. Other than that, let him lead the play and follow his lead. If he lets you have the toy, great, if he's not ready to, play side by side with him with something else.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Miss Information View Post
Have you heard of the toddler rules of possession?

1. If I like it, it's mine.
2. If it's in my hand, it's mine.
3. If I can take it from you, it's mine.
4. If I had it a little while ago, it's mine.
5. If it's mine, it must NEVER appear to be yours in any way.
6. If I'm doing or building something, all the pieces are mine.
7. If it looks just like mine, it is mine.
8. If I saw it first, it's mine.
9. If you are playing with something and you put it down, it automatically becomes mine.
10. If it's broken, it's yours.
I was just telling my 6 and 10 year old about these rules the other night. we were laughing so hard because it's funny and so, so true!

OP-have you posted in the toddler forum? There are probably lots of good ideas there as well.
 

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At age one, there is such a small distinction between parenting and helping your child develop and schooling/education. It sounds like you work really hard at it! I'm glad you have a bright little one!

For more general developmental concerns (such as getting your baby to open his hand and give you something) you should read and post in the Toddler forum for lots of great suggestions!

http://www.mothering.com/discussions...splay.php?f=31
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NewMom0208 View Post
This is great! Thank you very much!

ok, I have another one for you. Although maybe I just have to wait.
Sometimes I need to get things off his hands for safety or property reasons (a pen, my car keys, somebody else's purse) This, I just do, and, when the tantrum starts I just say "I know you are frustrating, it is a drag, but you can hurt yourself, that is that lady's purse", etc)

Now, other times I just want to take something from his hand to show him a variation of use that might be more fun. As soon as I just touch the object on his hand, he tightens the fist and start complaining...If I insist I get full force cry. (he is one year old). Any way I can get him to hand me things and trusting he is getting it back or I am asking for too much and I shoud just let him be?
My 16 mo old is the same way. I don't like to play the 'I'm bigger than you, so I'm taking it card'. When I have to take something, I always give her something. It doesn't have to be anything great, just something for her to hold so she isn't left empty handed, looking at the thing I "stole." Even if she's unhappy about the swap, she doesn't get as upset as when she's left empty handed.
 
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