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Hey ladies. It's December. Look alive everybody. Post an update.<br><br>
And the last question posted, by Erin:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>dharmama</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hey NT mamas. Can I pop in for a quick question?<br><br>
My aunt is way into NT and I pulled her name for our Christmas present exchange. Can you suggest any gift ideas? We usually spend $50-75.<br><br>
She owns NT and Dr. Price's book and she's already a member of local chapter.<br><br>
I was reading my Mother Earth News mag the other night and thought she might like a subscription to that (especially since this month there are articles on root cellaring and pasture-fed animals).<br><br>
Any other suggestions?<br><br>
Thanks mamas!<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
~Erin (who is VERY interested in NT...but also vegetarian and trying to figure out how to reconcile the two <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> )</div>
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Good question. I'll think on it a bit. If you do the subscription you might also add Utne. I've been enjoying that a lot lately. It compiles cool articles from various publications and has some original articles. It definitely is environmental, substainable agriculture, etc. Always very inspiring and interesting.
 

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DOH, I posted on the old thread before I got down the 'unread' list far enough to see you started a new thread <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I'll look for this one now.<br><br>
Heather
 

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My update:<br>
My mother, grandmother, and brother came to visit and my mom made us 3 gallons of kimchee! I now have more kimchee than I know what to do with.<br><br>
Back to eating red meat and feeling better, though I still need more sleep as my brain is getting pretty scattered. I have some oxtail soup simmering on the stove right now.<br><br>
I have cabbage to make sauerkraut, now I just need to find the time to shred and stomp.<br><br>
Hmm...holiday gifts...I really want a Harsch fermenting crock, a Brix refractometer, and a milking goat. Other good gifts for an NT'er would be a dehydrator (for low temp drying of nuts and seeds, and jerky), traditional food cookbooks (ethnic ones like the Mexican ones from Diana Kennedy and Rick Bayless, The Joy of Cooking, "Growing up in a Korean Kitchen" by Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall, and probably more that I don't know of) and paleo-style cookbooks like The Garden of Eating Diet and the books by Dr. Mercola.<br><br>
Some of those things would be pretty expensive though, like the dehydrator and the fermenting crock.
 

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Hope it's ok if I just jump in here. I've found the previous threads very helpful. We're just making the transition to a kind of NT/WAP/Mercola combo. I've started giving ds cod liver oil supps and taking fish and borage oil myself. We discovered kombucha at our HFS several months ago and <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> it but it's pretty $$ to buy. Can anyone post a link on how to make it yourself. Kefir blueberry smoothies are really popular with mama and ds. And we just bought our first package of Organic Pastures cheese <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yummy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yummy"> Oh boy is this cheese!!! It tastes so different from the regular kind.
 

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Here are the first two pages of a Kombucha info sheet I ship with Kombucha 'SCOBYs' and a Brew Info sheet, if you already have access to a Scoby. Alternatively, you could do everything in the 'brew info sheet' and then add in two bottles of store bought Kombucha, and let it brew for a few days longer...you will probably grow a 'mushroom' and then you will have your own. If the product you are buying is truely 'alive' and 'kickin' with Kombucha culture, this will work.<br><br><b>Kombucha Culture (SCOBY) Info Sheet</b><br><br>
The Kombucha <b>SCOBY</b> Culture, sometimes mistakenly referred to as a <i>mushroom</i>, is actually a <b>S</b>ymbiotic <b>C</b>olony of <b>B</b>acteria and <b>Y</b>easts (the friendly type).<br><br>
The Kombucha culture looks like a white rubbery pancake. The culture is placed in sugar sweetened black or green tea and allowed to ferment for about 7-10 days and turns the tea into a sea of health giving acids and nutrients.<br><br>
The Kombucha culture feeds on the sugar and, in exchange, produces other valuable substances which change into the drink: glucuronic acid, glucon acid, lactic acid, vitamins, amino acids, antibiotic substances, and other products.<br><br>
The Kombucha culture is, therefore, a real tiny biochemical factory.<br>
Numerous improvements have been noted in overall health, including: increased energy, sharper eyesight, better skin condition, and improved ‘eliminations’ to name a few. (The list is really long and somewhat anecdotal, but personal experience is the best gauge for how it makes you feel).<br><br>
The daily use of <i>controlled</i> amounts of Kombucha Tea, along with improved diet (particularly increased water intake), can help to deal with a variety of ailments, and/or help to maintain good health.<br><br><span style="color:#FF0000;">Kombucha is a valuable supplement to health care, however, is not a substitute or replacement for established or required professional medical care.</span> It is recommend that individuals stay open to input, use methods that work for you, and avoid extremist positions regarding your health care.<br><br>
Numerous doctors and scientists have concerned themselves with the effects of the Kombucha-beverage as a home remedy. Many scientific works are at hand concerning Kombucha. They speak of its therapeutic effectiveness as based on glucon-acid, glucuron-acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, as well as the life-supporting vitamins C and the B-group. As has been proven especially by Russian researchers, many of its components have antibiotic and detoxifying characteristics, and they play a decisive role for the biochemical processes in the body.<br><br>
Regardless of what you may read or hear, if you are making your own Kombucha Tea, it is strongly recommend that you:<br>
Use of stainless steel or glass pots (for brewing the tea),<br>
a large, wide mouth glass jar (for fermenting),<br>
and wooden or plastic utensils to handle or strain.<br><br>
You must avoid contact with metal containers/objects, in regards to care/storage of the fermented tea and the cultures themselves.<br><br><span style="color:#008080;">You should be careful regarding the amount of Kombucha Tea you use <i>initially</i> to avoid stomach upset.</span><br><br>
As a rule, most people should limit intake to:<br><b>[A maximum of 2 oz., 2X daily (4 oz. total) to start]</b><br><br>
Excessive use (especially if you have not been consuming many fermented foods/drinks) might cause some physical discomfort until your body adjusts.<br><br><b>Make it Yourself! No Problem if You Know How!</b><br><br>
The Kombucha beverage can be made in one's home for just pennies. Because the mushroom constantly grows, one can begin with a piece of a mushroom-tea membrane. You can prepare the Kombucha beverage right at home and pass the tea-mushroom from family to family as a sign of friendship and mutual helpfulness. Kombucha has high vitality and a great capacity for regeneration. If it did not have this high biologic energy, it would not have survived the long time span from its reported discovery in the Chinese Empire more than 2000 years ago until now.<br><br>
Nowadays, there are occasional warnings - mostly coming from ignorance or economic interests - not to make the Kombucha beverage by oneself. Such warnings are justified, as far as you should definitely stick to a proven recipe and make sure you know things to look for if your batch should get mold or you use an unproven recipe and it ferments wierd.<br><br>
As long as you work clean and abide by proven directions, then there is no hesitation in making the Kombucha drink. It’s preparation just needs to be dealt with as with any other "open" foodstuffs in one's household. When abiding by proven instructions, one can produce an impeccable, tasty, wholesome and effective Kombucha beverage. The mushroom will increase and accompany its owner lifelong and serve him or her well.<br><br><b>Here is a great website for more info: <a href="http://www.kombu.de/english.htm" target="_blank">http://www.kombu.de/english.htm</a></b><br><br><br><b>Kombucha Tea - SCOBY BREWING INFO SHEET</b><br><br>
Using clean, unchlorinated water, filtered water:<br><br>
Boil a gallon of water and add in 1 to 1.5 cups of white cane sugar. When it boils, turn it off and add in 8 standard size tea bags of black or green tea (I made regular Lipton tea until I knew what it should taste and smell like. Then I experimented with green tea). I like the regular black tea better.<br><br>
Put a lid on and let it 'steep' for about 15 minutes.<br><br>
Remove tea bags, and cover the pot again. Let cool to room temp. You could refrigerate or set the pot in the sink in cool water. (If in a hurry).<br><br>
When the tea is luke warm or room temp, pour the prepared tea into a gallon size glass brewing container with a wide mouth and add the mother mushroom culture (SCOBY) AND the Kombucha liquid it came with. This pre-made Kombucha helps immediately lower the PH and gets it to fermenting asap.<br><br>
Set the brewing container in a warm area (76F to 86F degrees) out of direct sunlight; cover the top of the container with a paper towel or coffee filter and secure with a rubber band. Try not to disturb the vessel by moving it around.<br><br>
Let the tea ferment for 6 to 7 days then strain the tea off into another glass container and cool in the refrigerator until ready to drink. That's all there is to it!<br><br>
Start the above procedure again, with either the new baby mushroom that will form on the top of the vessel, or use the mother (which sometimes sinks closer to the bottom).<br><br><b>TIPS:</b> The day you are going to ‘pour up’ your Kombucha tea, have another gallon of tea made and cooled already, so either your mother or the new baby mushroom can quickly ‘get to brewing’ again. You do not want them sitting around for very long, without being in new tea or some of the brewed Kombucha.<br><br>
When you go to remove the mushrooms, the mother and baby might be ‘stuck’ together, that’s fine. Just wash you hands thoroughly, and place them on a clean plate or platter with some of the freshly brewed Kombucha. You will be able to ‘peel’ them apart and you can either place the baby or the mother in a baggie with 1 cup of the Kombucha and place in your refrigerator until you give it away or need it for brewing (keep for about 2 weeks, then compost if not going to use it.)<br><br>
Once a ‘mother mushroom’ starts turning brown with age and from being in the tea solution, it’s time to use a baby and compost the ‘mother’.<br><br>
Here is a website with a TON of info on making and keeping Kombucha: <a href="http://w3.trib.com/~kombu/" target="_blank">http://w3.trib.com/~kombu/</a>
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Hmm...holiday gifts...I really want a Harsch fermenting crock, a Brix refractometer, and a milking goat.</td>
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Thanks!! I bet my aunt would love a milking goat too! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Thanks again.<br><br>
~Erin<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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Osiyo! Please count me in as trad foodist, although I am still learning. I find these threads to be extremely helpful. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> --- sg
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hola.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hola">:<br>
Thanks for the new thread.<br><br>
I have a question- I was just looking at the recipe index in NT for split pea soup. It says it is on page 251. But it's wrong! I can't find any recipes in the whole book for split peas! If anyone can check theirs out and let me know if it is just me, I'd be very appreciative. lol I have to use my split peas and don't know if they need to be soaked or not or what.<br><br>
I've gotten more adventurous with bread making. Finally started my sourdough starter this month and have made the NT bread recipe. Right now the sponge for the Recycled grain bread recipe from Wild Fermentation is rising, I can't wait to see how it turns out.<br><br>
The apple crisp in NT is very yummy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yummy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yummy">
 

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well Im slowly incorporating the NT ideas into our diets. I have kefir every morning before breakfast. Last night I made some yogurt cheese. I will try it after my kefir. I havent been able to find raw milk, but only have organic. Same with eggs. We have a local farm that makes eggs with Omega 3's in them that are organic. My ds and I sprouted mung beans the other day and we all loved them.<br>
One question-the stuff that drained off my yogurt to make the cheese...this is the whey right? So can I use that to soak my oatmeal in for tomorrow? Thanks for any info...Im still waiting on the NT book to come back to the library so I can check it out.<br><br>
one other question-I just got some organic chicken sausage links with herbs. Any good ideas on what I should do with them for dinner?<br>
Here is what is in them<br>
Our chicken sausage is packaged 4 pieces to a 12 oz package. They are made from organic pasture raised chicken legs and all the other ingredients are 100% organic too: flour, salt, spices, and herbs. They are skinless so do not have another species' casing on them. These are fully cooked and taste great grilled or boiled. Both gourmets and kids like them. No gross parts are put in our sausages. We invented them so we could finally eat all the sausage we wanted worry-free.<br>
Ingredients: Chicken pieces, Chives, White pepper, Black pepper, Sea salt, Water, Parsley, Coriander, Wheat flour, Mustard, Sweet basil, Sugar cane
 

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hi everyone!<br>
i am so glad to see nt threads here <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
i have been into nt for a little over two years and a co leader here in ct.<br>
anyway i saw a couple of questions i knew answers to so i thought i would de lurk <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
tweety~ the split pea soup is a varriation of the roman soup that is on the page you mentioned, it is at the bottom of the page<br><br>
the whey left over from making yougurt cheese is good to use for soaking grains<br><br>
also nt gift ideas... maybe a yogurt making crock they sell a cool one (not very expensive so you would also get other stuff, but kinda cool) you fill with hot water and it keeps itr at the right temp and it is made of pretty pottery. my friend has one but i don't know where she got it from, i imagine you could google it. maybe a basket with some celtic salt, a salt grinder, and some nt appropriate snacks... this site might have some things you might be interested in <a href="http://www.realfoodsmarket.com/rfm/" target="_blank">http://www.realfoodsmarket.com/rfm/</a><br>
how great that you have a family member that is into nt, she would probably have some good info on how to eat veg, but still in an nt vein. if you want some ideas... switch to raw milk, use cultured butter(raw if you can get it), and soak your grains so they are better digested. with just those things you could be on your way <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> if you can look at your aunts book, or borrow from the library, read the grain, fats, and dairy section.
 

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i borrowed a copy of NT yesterday and skim-read it from cover to cover this morning while dd napped. i'm so inspired....but also slightly overwhelmed by the multi-day processes.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/offtopic.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="offtopic"> hey lisa! where in ct are you? i'm in so. ri and looking for raw dairy sources!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi ladies. Welcome everyone.<br><br>
Not much new around here. We spent some time yesterday in the garden filling up empty milk jugs with warm water and putting them in the raised beds which are covered with plastic. The water will warm up during the day and release some heat at night. It has been awfully cold up here lately -- 20 degrees or less at night, about 40 some during the day. That's cold for us California folks.
 

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Welcome new faces! Glad to see you all! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Made my kraut this morning so hope it comes out well. The last few batches of fermented veggies that DH made we had to toss. So hopefully my batch comes out great so I can feel superior in my lacto-fermenting success. :LOL (kidding!)<br><br>
I thought of another good thing for veggie NT'ers--make sure to use good fats and not the bad stuff like "vegetable" oil, canola, etc. Get in some saturated fats like coconut or palm oil. Avoid anything partially or fully hydrogenated. Extra virgin olive oil is good. I think that's the gist of it.<br><br>
eta: Selu Gigage, I just saw your blog. What an excellent idea! I did a somewhat similar thing when I first started transitioning back to an omni diet--my heritage is Korean so I started trying to eat a traditional Korean diet. It was quite interesting and I learned a lot.
 

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Thank you, Lisa! I found the Roman Lentil Soup recipe. The problem was it is on pg 215, not page 251- I guess they did a typo in my book. I guess I'll assume the split peas get soaked too.<br><br>
The bread is cooking, I hope it turned out. I let it rise overnight and when I went to shape it into loaves, the dough would not hold shape at ALL. Maybe I needed more flour? Oh well-even when bread doesn't turn out at it's best-it always makes good toast! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> mmm..with lots of butter and raw honey. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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Found the december thread... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
So my NT adventures continue and I am feeling better and better. The changes made in the last year include:<br><br>
Eliminating Soy products except tempeh and miso occasionally<br>
Soaking everything first with a bit of whey<br>
Making my own youghurt and youghurt cheese<br>
Making my own sourdough from spelt flour<br>
Including bone broths<br>
Making Kefir drinks, mostly juice and nutmilk kefir<br>
Including Bison in the diet<br>
Making all my own nutmilks, no milks from a container anymore (except dairy, gotta get that jersey cow :LOL)<br>
Veg fermentation on a regular basis<br><br>
Thats my update, Thanks for listening!<br><br>
Toraji: What do you do with the pulp from your nuts when making nutmilk?
 

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mountain mom, I answered on the other thread.<br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showpost.php?p=2341883&postcount=79" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...3&postcount=79</a><br>
I never really found a good use for it. But thinking about it now, I'll bet that you could make a pretty good "crumb" topping out of it--sweetened with maple syrup and mixed with soaked cracked oats, then toasted/dehydrated to a crisp.
 

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I am thinking of trying to made somekind of crust for a youghurt cheese cake. Trying to create one item that connects to another in the kitchen. I think a youghurt cheese cake would be a great way to get some dense nutrients into dd and really into dh too!
 

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I moved this here since it seems more appropriate than starting a different thread...<br><br>
Okay, since it's almost Christmas I need to start planning my holiday treats. I'm gonna use my NT book since the sweet stuff is pretty much sugar free. I was wondering about the cookie recipes. They all seem to call for Rapadura as a sweetener but no stores in the area carry it. Couldn't I just use honey, maple syrup, or agave necter instead? Or would they alter the taste too much? I'm thinking about doing the almond cookies and the peanut cookies...and also maybe the carob chip cookies <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> They all call for half a cup, so if you know how I could successfully substitute for it let me know.<br><br>
I was also wondering if it's okay to use buttermilk in recipes that call for either regular milk or yogurt. Thanks!
 
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