Mothering Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my midwife's billing policy states that "in the event of a transfer, the bulk of your benefits will probably be paid to the delivering provider." and then we'll be responsible to pay her fee out of pocket.<br><br>
anyone have any advice/experience with this? how would HB differ from when i delivered with a hospital based midwifery practice and then ended up with a section in the hospital?<br><br>
although paying her fee out of pocket certainly would be a motivation - i can see myself getting really bogged down by this mentally. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
check with the insurance co.<br><br>
It would seem logical that in the event of a transfer, she wouldn't be billing for the birth. (unless the transfer was for after birth complications, in that case it would be no different then a medical bill for any other emeegency)<br><br>
So she gets prenatal, emergency provider gets to bill for birth. Or is transfer is after birth, she bills for both and MD bills for emergency care post partum.<br><br>
I've never heard of it being an either-or situation. But I can understand that she's probably had insurance difficulties in the past and had to add that into her contract.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
My MW said that if I transfer she gets nothing from my insurance. In that case, she would be trusting me to pay her anyway out of pocket.<br><br>
I think it is still worth it to do a homebirth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,484 Posts
I think what she's saying is that in the event of the transfer -- which is something beyond her control -- she would not get paid at all for attending your birth. Theoretically, she could have been at your home providing labor support and expertise for 24 hours, then transfer with you to the hospital for another 12 hours, continuing to provide support at the hospital, and then be paid nothing at all by the insurance company. She's just trying to make sure she can be compensated fairly for her time.<br><br>
With doctors, it all ends up in the wash. Doctors pick up births of other people's patients and vice versa, so they still end up getting paid for a large number of births. With a midwife who has so few clients, there is no opportunity for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,889 Posts
I have successfully billed for my services during a transport. There is an hourly code that is billed for attending a woman in labor. The insurance codes allow for CNMs and family physicians to bill for their time at a hospital birth even if an OB does a C-section or a forceps delivery. It makes sense that the codes would allow for this -- what if a CNM spends 12 hours with someone and then an OB does a 10 minute forcep delivery?<br><br>
Someone should PM Doctorjen and have her weigh in on this thread. I would be interested in what she does when she has to transfer care.<br><br>
Many midwives just bill with one global code for everything -- if you have a transport you can't do that, but you should be able to split it up and at least get paid for prenatal and postpartum care.<br><br>
Here is some of the info I used when coming up with my billing methods:<br><br><a href="http://gentlebirth.org/archives/sampleBillingScenarios.html#Birth" target="_blank">http://gentlebirth.org/archives/samp...ios.html#Birth</a>
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top