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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ds will be starting at a new Montessori this coming school year. Ideally, if all went well, I would love to leave him there through 6th grade, but I don't foresee being able to afford it and I'm hoping for the public Montessori the following year.

As some of you may remember, this past school year got off to a rocky start, and the teachers grossly underestimated his abilities - keeping him in the wrong classroom with activities that were not stimulating to him. He is definitely not a child to be judged on first impressions. He spirited and independent-minded. When he is anxious, he often does not show what he is able to do readily; and when he is bored, he can get naughty.

Being a little gun-shy after last year's bad experience, I wonder if there is something I should do to support his transition, so that he is not so underestimated in his abilities again. Would it be appropriate for me to ask his previous teacher (the one who actually took time to understand him) to send a letter with the works he's done, or for me to send a letter explaining him a little or to sit down with the new teacher - or is this overkill? I don't want to be the overly-involved, pushy mom - I just don't want to waste a portion of this year struggling to get him working on appropriate works, and then possibly face it again next year for another transition.

TIA!
 

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Hi, Rose-Roget!

I am a teacher, so I thought I would respond. When a new student arrives in my classroom, I like to get as much info. as possible about them. However, I do believe in "fresh starts" so I take that info. and put it in the back of my mind and try to see the child with my own eyes. (Mostly if the info. isn't very good.)

In your case it's hard. EVERY parent thinks their child is gifted. (I'm not saying your DS isn't, it's just if I had a dime for every time I've been told that...) Lots of teachers take a parent saying their child is gifted with a grain of salt.

Here's what I would do: I would contact the new teacher and meet with her. The more "evidence" you can present to her will be better. I would ask his previous teacher if it would be okay for the new teacher to call her. I usually get my best information from previous teachers.

Do you know anyone else going to this school? I have a friend in your situation; she and another parent of a gifted child have placed their kids in the same classroom hoping that it will be easier for the teacher to accommodate two talented students rather than just one.

Hope this helps and hope your son has a great year!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by Aquitane View Post
Hi, Rose-Roget!
In your case it's hard. EVERY parent thinks their child is gifted. (I'm not saying your DS isn't, it's just if I had a dime for every time I've been told that...) Lots of teachers take a parent saying their child is gifted with a grain of salt.
Thanks for this information. I just want to clarify - I didn't say my child was gifted. He's certainly bright, but I'm not trying to push him into an accelerated program or anything. I just don't want them to look at some of his immaturity and peg him as less skilled than he is - that's when he gets into trouble.

For example, this past year, he was in the younger classroom (it's a long story - you could look for my previous posts, if you're confused) with only simple puzzles and sensory materials when he was more than ready for more advanced works with older kids. His teacher cited his moving from activity to activity as an inability to focus his attention and thus reason not to move into the more age-appropriate classroom (he was 4 and new to Montessori, but the kids in his class were all younger than him). Really, he just wasn't interested in the works because he was ready for more. At this same time, he was also refusing the teacher more frequentlly and doing his own "experiments" with the water or other works. His experiments were not necessarily appropriate, but the reason for them, again, was lack of stimulation. Once he was finally moved upstairs (took a lot of advocating on my part), he progressed and thrived. His new teacher said it would have been completely inappropriate to leave him in the other classroom any longer and that he was definitely ready for kindergarten this year, academically (he's almost 5).

Anyway, maybe I'll check with the good teacher and see if his new one can call her. I don't know anyone else at the school, and I don't know much about the individual teachers, so it's hard for me to advocate who would be a better fit for him or anything. Thanks again!
 
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