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What defines this and how does it effect allergy testing?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br>
DS1 is *horrible* when it comes to needles, so I'm wondering if his would be considered a "traumatic" blood draw. Just mentioning "needle" makes him tense up. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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When we had DD's blood drawn for the ELISA (3 labs, no one could get her veins, finally someone got some blood...), they called us the next day and said they couldn't use her blood because it was lipemic and hemolyzed. She said that's what happens with a 'traumatic' blood draw (I think that the hemolysis is more of a concern that lypemia from a traumatic blood draw, but I could be wrong.) This is what I found when I googled:
<ul><li>lipemic - means there is an excess of fatty lipids in the blood.
<ul><li>the lab said that the way to avoid this is to either fast before the test, or have the lab that's drawing the blood spin it off immediately (will separate the fatty lipids)</li>
</ul></li>
<li>hemolyzed - when the red blood cells burst or break. This can happen from drawing the blood out too quickly, or through too small of a needle (or both)</li>
</ul>
In our case, I think it was a problem because Sage only used the plasma, so when the blood cells burst it contaminated the plasma and they couldn't use it. So we had the lab drawing the blood spin off the plasma for us, and then it was fine when we sent it in.
 
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