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This is long but it may be of use to someone out there...<br><br>
My 5 month old son has eczema and while it's very mild now it did flair quite badly when he was around 2 months old. His face, ears, scalp, eyes, and elbows had big, itchy, sometimes oozing patches. I could see where it was also spreading around his belly and a bit on his legs and hands...I was very distraught over this and wanted to try to find some kind of relief without using the steroids my pediatrician suggested.<br><br>
I ended up taking my son to a local acupuncturist who is also trained and experienced in a Japanese form of needle-less, pressure point bodywork called "Sho-ni-shin". I took my son in once a week for 6 weeks and gave him the Chinese prescription herbs that were recommended with the treatment. I asked if there were any herbs that I could use as a compress and was given an herbal mix that I could put in his bath water to help dry up his oozing patches.<br><br>
My son's skin improved dramatically with the acupuncture and herbs. I'd say 90% of the horrible, persistant eczema is gone. He still has some small dime-sized spots on his ears and a quarter-sized spot on his forehead.<br><br>
I'm so pleased with the results of this treatment and would just like to tell others that if they are open to the idea, they should consider finding an acupuncturist who is trained in Sho-ni-shin and who also has experience treating infants and kids. Children's bodies respond very well to acupuncture so it may be worth a try if you've exhausted all other avenues...(now if a child is covered from head to toe with eczema - with no healthy skin to work on - then this treatment may not be an option... but I'm not exactly sure).<br><br>
Another resource I found very helpful is the National Jewish Hospital's web site. National Jewish is the #1 respiratory hospital in the US (Denver) and they have a department that specializes in pediatric eczema and allergies. The site lists a toll free number that people can call to talk to the pediatric nurses about their children's eczema. I called this number and found the nurses very supportive and knowledgeable. I know the hospital's eczema clinic teaches and recommends wet/dry wraps for eczema...<br><br>
I live in Colorado and have taken my son to National Jewish for allergy testing...I was given some samples of the Atopiclair that is mentioned in the above posts (the pediatric doctor who saw my son was the leading doctor in the study of Atopiclair and eczema) I have not used any of the samples though. I was told by the doctor that the medicine is effective for treating mild to moderate eczema and that it is very expensive - $100.00 for 100ml tube. I read online that it contains shea butter and I've seen general posts online that some people can react to this?<br><br>
My routine with my son:<br>
*chinese herbs every day given orally<br>
*Florababy brand probiotics given once a day<br>
*bathe 2-3 times a day, 20 min, no soaps, pat dry<br>
*moisturize within 3 minutes of getting out of tub. i slather on pure grapeseed oil all over body except scalp.<br>
*moisturize all over, including scalp, with Nelson's brand Calendula cream. this stuff has worked great with my son - takes away redness, relieves itch, not greasy at all. i use it throughout the day as needed.<br>
*dye and fragrance free laundry soap, 2nd rinse cycle.<br>
*with the extreme flair-up i also used pure aloe vera to help soothe skin. haven't needed to use it at all since acupuncture.
 

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My DD's is completely corn-intolerance. No corn = no eczema. I don't put anything on it, it just goes away about 4-5 days after she steals some food of my other kids, who can have corn. I did an elimination diet with her to find out all her triggers. And yes, she reacts to zucchini, so it's not impossible.
 

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Also, the cats have to be out of the house at least 2-3 months before you can see results. My DH (cat-induced asthma) went to my brother's housewarming party and there hadn't been a cat in the house for 2 months, but there were rugs, and DH had to use an emergency inhaler within the first half hour of being there. So it will take a while to determine if that was causing it. How long have the cats been gone, and are there still carpets and upholstered furniture that could still have the cat hair on it?
 

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use antihistamines to control the itching.<br>
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What type?
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/notes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="notes">:
 

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I didnt have much success with atopiclair, but I think because there was still dairy in my ds system. Now we are dairy free and he stays clear. When dairy has managed to get in to me, he shows it. We're just recovering from a flare up from Hylands teething tablets (lactose base). That being said, when he gets bad from dairy, I do use hydrocortisone. It is only once in a while, other wise he itches like a maniac, and it gets worse. I try benadryl, which helps after a while, but not as quickly. We are pretty on top of things, so our slip ups only happen once in a blue moon.
 

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I posted a question about DD's eczema on LWAB recently and got some great suggestions, (it's well worth reading) one of which was Neem Oil. Apparently it has natural steroid properties. I haven't tried it yet as my health food store didn't have it but it's on order <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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WOW!!! This is a great post with SO much useful tips <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
Just an FYI Atopiclair has shea nut in it so beware and Elidel has a black box warning on it for the past 4 years from the FDA because it can cause cancer.
 

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My son is almost 2 1/2 and just a couple of months ago he developed eczema and we use several things<br><br>
no soap baths<br>
tea tree oil diluted in olive oil after his bath each night and every morning - it helps; rub it on the eczema<br>
when he scratches too much and the spot gets infected we apply a thick layer or manuca honey and then put a bandage over it over night - the inflammation is GONE by morning; absolutely gone<br>
also Waleda skin food or Waleda baby cream - on the eczema and all over his body; it helps<br><br>
we are still in the process of determining the cause . the tea tree oil and manuca honney get rid of the eczema but then one of us (he is BF) eats the wrong thing and we are back to square one. But we have THE BEST Nurse Practitioner and she is EXTREMELY knowledgeable on the allergy topic so we are blessed to have met her. If you are on the Monterey Peninsula I will give you her number.<br><br>
also check out the book "Is this your child?" by Doris Rapp M.D.<br><br>
try to avoid the steroids...too many side effects...try manuca and tea tree oil
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>karin95</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9010055"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I didn't list everything we do, but your list is the one I would have written!<br><br>
*We give him 2 20-minute baths a day. No soap. Fresh washcloth and towel for each bath.<br>
*Goop him up with Vanicream & cortisone on the hot spots. (the vanicream lotion on his face, alternating with cortisone).<br>
*We were wet wrapping him (for his arms and legs and chest) for a few weeks and now have stopped.<br>
*We use a very "clean" detergent and it doesn't seem to aggrevate him.<br>
*We are moving our cats to my MILs house and then we'll do a deep cleaning to get rid of as much dander as possible.<br>
*He sleeps in an Amby hammock (much of the time) and we change his sheet on that daily, pretty much.<br>
*We swaddle him to sleep, still at 7 month old, so he won't scratch in his sleep.<br>
*All cotton clothing.<br><br>
And we LOVE LOVE LOVE kidswithfoodallergies.com. It's been a lifesaver for us, truly.<br><br>
Our TED includes:<br>
Teff (grain)<br>
nutritional yeast<br>
olive oil<br>
sea salt<br>
zucchini<br>
pears<br><br>
We just added RICE this weekend (gave it to him directly and for us). So far so good *knocks on wood*.<br><br>
I would just like to know if other people have cleared up bad eczema without steroids. We're afraid not to use them, because we just can't handle it getting back to being as bad as it was.</div>
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would you post your porridge recipe? sounds yummy!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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OTC remedy saved our bacon--after trying Many Other Methods

i know this is a little dated. our baby had the worst weeping eczema and thick cradle cap. the pediatrician prescribed antibiotics which just made me weep. but we were so desperate and tried it. it never even touched it. here's what we FINALLY got to work (tried every natural cream for babies we could find):

*blot it dry (gently!)
*apply a THIN layer of Neosporin CREAM (not the ointment). we only did this step a couple times
*glob on like frosting California Baby Calming/Calendula cream.. (can get at Target). i put it on her face when i knew she'd be still for a long time (asleep, nursing...) and could actually watch it soaking in. I used it ALL the time. We went through a couple little jars of the cream, but WORTH IT. cleared up in a couple weeks, after months of nothing else working.
(also tried lots of diet restrictions; we never did find an allergy for her)
 

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Severe Eczema Cleared Naturally

Yes! We healed my son's skin by 95% through natural methods. We originally started with cortisone, but we quickly saw that his skin came back worse than before each time we took the mandatory breaks from the medication. So, that pushed us to natural methods and wow, did it help! Mostly dietary changes, natural skin care and supplements were what helped us. You can read about our story here: Natural Remedies for Eczema: What Worked for My Son

My son didn't have weeping eczema, but in that case, you may want to look at specific weeping eczema treatments.

And be careful with cortisone as topical steroid addiction and topical steroid withdrawal are becoming more widespread. Search TSW on Instagram and you'll see what I mean. Not to scare anyone though. If they are used for short periods of time in lose doses, topical steroids shoudl be ok, but not always. Proceed with caution.
 

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My daughter has chronic eczema and over the years we've tried a lot different creams and nothing has come as close to bringing her the much needed relief of itchy skin and healing as Foderma serum! Thank you Foderma!!!!
 

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How to get rid of weeping eczema?

Hi everyone! As this amazing Flawless community starts to grow, I’ve noticed that there have been a lot more questions about eczema diet, dealing with eczema naturally, etc. It’s a wonderful thing to hear more from you, because it means that we are growing, and I couldn’t be happier to be part of a community of people, starting to clear their skin naturally!

I always try to talk about the :eek::crying:big eczema issues that come up, so today I want to address a BIG problem that has recently been seen in more and more in eczema sufferers: the dreaded weeping eczema. Weeping eczema is eczema that is wet, weeping or that looks like fluid-filled blisters.

There are actually two types of weeping eczema: primary and secondary.

Primary types refer to the blistering types of eczema, such as dysrodhitc eczema, nummular eczema or discoid eczema. These can vary from just one or two blisters, or small crops of more than three. These look like blisters and contain a clear fluid. This fluid can leak through the skin’s epidermis if scratched, bumped, or picked at (very common to happen), which is where the primary term “weeping eczema” comes from.

Secondary types refer to the weeping caused by a secondary problem, and is often confused with primary types. The biggest difference between the two is that secondary weeping eczema happens after your initial breakout, in response to outside bacteria or foreign items. Secondary types can occur over large areas of the body, or over areas of previously dry eczema. Secondary types contain milky or yellow fluid.

mainly focus on secondary weeping in this article, as this is the one that affects a lot of eczema sufferers. Now you might have heard things about weeping eczema before like: “it’s just your body pushing out toxins”, “you need to detoxify your blood”, or “the weeping is normal”. I used to think some of these things myself, however as it turns out, many of these statements aren’t all that accurate.

Let me explain.

On your skin there lives a thriving community of bacteria, called Staphylococcus Aureus (or Staph A.) These are located in heavy concentrations around your nose, mouth, ears, privates, as well as just on your skin itself.

if you have weeping eczema, :nerd::nerd:pLEASE consult your doctor immediately! Especially if you have signs of an infection like a high fever or chills.

Here are some things that can help you!

  • Deeply moisturize dry cracked skin.
  • Put water back in
  • Use a water-based moisturizer
  • Remove the bacteria crusts
  • Use natural light therapy
  • Keep a low-inflammatory diet

Thanks,
Nav
 

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fIRST I SHOCKED with eczema then i got chance to apply FODERMA .superb pDT!!!QUALITY is excellent!
guys believe me. BEST one.. thanks to MY DOCTOR.!
 

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I've suffered for several months with moderately bad eczema, and foderma serum is doing what it's supposed to do. I'm so much better now, and I'll use it as long as I need to.
 

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FYI, IIRC, about 50% of eczema in kids is food-allergic eczema. My son's eczema was mainly that before we figured out his food triggers, but now it's more from environmental issues.

We use:
* vanicream for daily use (you can get it at your local pharmacy; if they don't have it they should be able to order it);
* 20 minute lukewarm baths once a day with NO soap;
* dustmite protectors on beds;
* hot water washes (drying on hot) for bedding once a week;
* all pets and stuffed animals and books kept out of the bedroom; some people also move to no curtains or rugs or carpets in the bedroom
* change of clothing and a bath immediately upon coming inside from playing outside in spring/fall/summer (i.e. pollen season);
* food/allergen exposure diary to try to identify triggers
* we use Sportswash lanudry detergent: soaps etc can be a big trigger of skin issues
* aggressive use of prescription steroids EARLY on problem patches; when we do this (I know you didn't want to do this) on the first day he has a bad patch, after two or three applications it's often gone. We almost never have real flaring problem spots anymore, but when we do and I let a problem patch go, it ends up we use more steroids in the long run. we now only have to do this three or four times a year, usually when he's had a diet exposure by accident.
* daily antihistamine to control itching
* onesies and other clothes that minimize the areas he can get to; plus clipped nails
* all cotton clothing; we aim for organic when he's having a bad flare

We have not had to do this, but wetwrapping can make an enormous difference in a child's skin.

What are your five foods and how long have you been on the diet?

Our lifeline in our allergy journey has been the forums at kidswithfoodallergies
Thanks for this.

We are similar. Trying to do everything as naturally as possible but have recently been applying a little steroid cream guiltily as our 6-month-old boy is really suffering from eczema on his face mainly.

It seems, however, from the list above, that there is more we can be doing. I will also check out that food allergy site.

Thanks,

L x
 

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I've been having problems with eczema for the last 14 years and finding a product that offers almost instant relief is hard to find! Foderma eczema serum is the best I have found. Not only does it offer quick relief but it is softening that skin!
 

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A great lotion for eczema

I have seen amazing results using this lotion, it is not sold at doctor's offices or stores and can only be purchased online. I can send you a video if you are interested in hearing more about it. Because I have a home based business I am not allowed to share the name here in public. Would love to hear from you and see why more moms prefer this than steroids.
Evelyn
:smile:
 
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