Mothering Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,654 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We recently found out that dd is allergic to wheat, so I have to go on a gluten free diet. I LOVE bread and all of the store bought brands of gluten free bread I have tried are gross. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I didn't even bother buying the cookies because they looked gross. Does anyone have any good gluten free bread recipes that actually taste like bread? I am looking for recipes for other things too that normally have wheat like cookies, cakes, etc. I know I can get lots of recipes online but I would like to know if any of you have any that you use regularly that you know are good. TIA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,187 Posts
dynamicdoula posted this recipe a few days ago:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">2 cups of ground quinoa (ground to cornmeal consistency)<br>
3/4 cup of ground flax<br>
1/4 cup brown rice protein (optional)<br>
1 tsp salt<br>
1/2 tsp baking powder (gluten free)<br>
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon<br>
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg<br>
3/4 cup agave nectar<br>
1 cup butter, melted & cooled<br>
3 large eggs<br>
1 Tbs vanilla extract<br>
4 ripe bananas, mashed<br>
1/2 cup dates<br>
1/4 cup chopped walnuts<br>
1/4 cup pumpkin seeds<br>
1/8 cup (or so) sesame seeds<br><br>
Preheat the oven to 325, put muffin cups in pan. Melt the butter and set it aside to cool.<br><br>
Whisk together the dry ingredients (except the nuts/dates).<br><br>
Beat together the agave, butter, eggs and vanilla in larger mixing bowl until blended. Stir in the banana.<br><br>
Add the dry ingredients to the wet, add the nuts and dates, mix well<br><br>
Spoon into muffin cups, and bake about 25 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean. Place them on a rack to cool.</td>
</tr></table></div>
I've made it twice in the past week, and love it! My husband couldn't believe it was gluten free. I used coconut oil instead of butter, and honey instead of agave nectar, and I didn't use the rice protein. The second time I made it, I used chocolate chips instead of the dates, sesame seeds and pumpkin seeds. I think I also ground the quinoa finer than called for, it was closer to flour than cornmeal, but my older dd gets grumpy about seeds, chunks, anything identifiable except chocolate in her muffins *grumble grumble*<br><br>
The commercial breads I've tried have all been awful. Some of the cookies, otoh, are quite good. Pamela's cookies are great, as are Gluteno's. I *love* the Gluteno lemon wafers. I had to stop buying them because I was eating... uh... an entire pack in a sitting <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">: I'm told that Food for Life's rice tortillas are excellent, but I haven't tried them yet. I've been meaning to pick them up to try doing roll-ups, though. If you have any local gluten-free bakeries, they are usually great. We have a couple - <a href="http://www.mrritts.com/" target="_blank">Mr. Ritts</a> and <a href="http://www.goodeatz.org" target="_blank">Good Eatz</a>. They both have price lists online, I don't know if you can order from them. I think you can with Mr. Ritts, though I haven't been through their site recently. Anyway, I haven't tried Mr. Ritts' breads, but I have tried their baked goods and their flour blend and loved them. Good Eatz cakes and cookies are also fantastic.<br><br>
I've used Arrowhead Mills' Gluten Free All Purpose Baking Mix with good results. We made pancakes with it yesterday, and they were good. I used a third again as much of that mix than I would usually use flour, and the batter turned out a little bit more runny, so the pancakes were very thin. They had a good texture and flavor, I just had to be careful not to let them get too crispy. I liked that better than Arrowhead Mills' Pancake and Muffin Mix.<br><br>
And the best rice pasta you'll find is Tinkyada. But, stay nearby and keep testing pieces - it's easy to overcook it. Don't go by a timer! And stir it right away after pouring the pasta in the pot. It sticks together otherwise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,361 Posts
I have made these a few times with good results - though it has been a couple of years since I used the recipe (I was only wheat free but am no longer - yay!). They don't rise as much as regular biscuits and are a little bit crumbly like most GF stuff - but they taste really yummy!!<br><br>
Sift together 1/2c millet flour, 1/3c rice flour, 1 tsp baking powder and 3/4 tsp salt. Add 1 TBS oil, 1 TBS butter and 1/2 c milk to make a very soft dough. Form dough into 11 or 12 biscuits with hands (they are small). Bake on a greased, floured tin in a very hot oven for about 25 minutes.<br><br>
This is from a small (thin) soft back book/pamphlet called Allergy Baking Recipes by Hanna Kroeger publications. You might also get a copy of Bette Hagman's The Gluten-Free Gourmet.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
ETA - I have another older pamplet type called All Natural Allergy Recipes - Gluten and Dairy free by Jeanne Marie Martin. This one has lots of recipes that sound really great but I haven't made too many of them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,097 Posts
<a href="http://www.glutenchallenge.com" target="_blank">www.glutenchallenge.com</a><br><br><a href="http://www.pecanbread.com" target="_blank">www.pecanbread.com</a>
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top