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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Could someone please let me know if this is standard for hospital births?<br><br>
I had my baby a few weeks ago in the hospital. My plans for a natural, out-of-hospital birth with a midwife and doula went horribly wrong when baby went into major distress. Anyway, after an extremely long labor both in and out of hospital I ended up with an emergency C-section. Now that I'm up and about and un-medicated, I was wondering about some things...<br><br>
I had it in writing that baby was not to be given shots or eye gunk at birth. They gave her vitamin K and eye goo without even asking me. I mentioned my objection again after the fact (I noticed the goopy eyes) and was told, simply, "Well, it's too late now." Is there a law that prohibits me objecting to this? If so, why didn't they tell me upon reviewing my birth plan? What can I do about it now? Can baby have any problems resulting from this?<br><br>
I also said baby was to remain with me....but they insisted on taking her away and keeping her in the nursery the first night "in case she chokes." Choke on what?<br><br>
Also, since she was going to be in the nursery for those 8 hours, they insisted on regular formula feedings during that time, even though I said I'd be breastfeeding exclusively. Is there any reason to do this? Do babies need to eat so badly in their first day of life? I thought they weren't even hungry for a few days and that's why colostrum is okay those first days. Can't they just bring baby to me throughout the night since they're going to wake me every few hours to take my blood pressure anyway? (Just what an exhausted new mom who literally hasn't slept in 72 hours needs, by the way.)<br><br>
With a c-section, is there a medical reason why they need to cut the cord and wrap up your baby like a burrito with a hat before "allowing" you to see her and not even hold her right away? I'd said in my birth plan that in the unlikely (ha) event of a cesarean I was to be given the baby immediately. Wouldn't they have said something, again, if this were not possible?<br><br>
Are they always so snarky when you politely refuse the hep B shot -- about a million times, too?<br><br>
I know I should be happy (and I am) that everything eventually worked out and I have a healthy baby but some part of me is still upset about the whole delivery and how the above things were handled. I guess part of me just wants to vent but I really do wonder about the above things. Thank you in advance if you have any insight and for letting me express this here!
 

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Ohhhhh... Hugs to you, mama... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> I'm so sorry you had to go through all that- and sorry your baby had to go through all that, too.<br><br>
Unfortunately, in my experience with ds's hospital birth, it IS typical. They don't think to ask, they just automatically assume. Birth plans? HA! Like they read them or something? I had a nice birth plan written out, and shortly after my ds was born I realized they didn't read a single word of it. Sigh...<br><br>
Again, I really am sorry you went through all that- especially after expecting to have a beautiful out-of-hospital birth!
 

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You, unfortunately, got a very bad hospital experience. They shouldn't have done things to the baby without your permission. Also, there is no reason why the baby couldn't come to your chest after a c section. The formula feeding wasn't right either. I am so sorry.
 

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It probably is typical of hospital births, but I would also take action, I don't know if Suing would be appropriate, but Lots of letters to everyone stating that your wishes were not followed and etc... Maybe a letter to the editor?
 

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That has not been my experience with my 3 hospital births (I had one homebirth).<br><br>
I have even had 2 hurry-up c/s. I think that they went out of their way to do exactly what you didn't want them to do.
 

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So sorry to hear about your experience. I think what is "typical" really varies by hospital and even by the luck of the draw when it comes to who is on staff that day <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shake.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shake"> The hospital where I delivered is very supportive of midwife care and seem to work well with personal decisions. Then you have other experiences like my sister, who had a nurse actually lie to her about giving her babies supplements in the nursery even though it was even written on their chart not to do so (by the doctor). ITA with PP in that it would be really good to give the hosp. some feedback. They need to know when they have upset someone so much and given poor quality of care. I am glad that you have made it through so well, though. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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My experience is that hospitals take full advantage of you every chance they get.<br><br>
I am sorry this happened to you, but why didn't your doula or midwife or DP stand up for your plans and be sure they were carried out?<br><br>
I hope you write to them and let them know how you feel. Also get your records, NOW, and look them over.<br><br>
Complaining works. My own sister had an emergency caesarean for placenta previa and was in the hospital for five days due to blood loss. She was put in a room with another patient who had her baby easily and had parties every night she was there; every one stayed hours after visiting hours were over and the men stared at my sister trying her best to breastfeed her DD. I complained to the nurses who would not do anything, so I wrote a very nasty letter to the hospital administration; my sister got a written apology from the hospital and was remitted the cost of one day.<br><br>
I am sorry about your experience and hope you get well and enjoy your little one soon. You have a lifetime of joy with that beautiful child!!<br><br>
P.S.: the eye goop, depending on what it is an how much they gave your new child, can cause problems of a minor sort. If it is antibiotics, it can cause an allergy or sensitivity down the road, so get your records and find out. -OR- unlikely, but if it was AgNO3, Silver Nitrate, there is some, not much evidence, it can cause myopia in later years, but many people get that genetically anyway.<br><br>
At any rate, it does interfer with the important eye to eye contact in the first few days of life.<br><br>
I hope the experience helps you with your resolve to be the best mother that you can!!
 

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Write to them: address it to the patient advocate, the nurse manager(s) of the OB unit, the hospital's director of nursing, the hospital's VP of patient care, the hospital's CEO...right on up the chain of command. Can also include your physician(s) and the director of the medical staff, but things like these are primarily the nursing staff's responsibility... Physicians very rarely involve themselves with patient wishes like taking the babe away/wrapping them like a burrito, etc...<br><br>
OB units are generally money makers for the hospital, and administrations like to keep patients happy.<br><br>
On a personal note, I am so, so sorry for your experience, mama. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/heartbeat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="heartbeat">
 

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That is not typical where I live or at least not with any dr./MW I would use. The eye goo and vit K maybe . I know my midwife swooped in just in time. it was just habit. once they saw who my midwife was (long story, I didn't actually birth in the hospital, idn't quite make it, she followed me up but baby was in distress so they rushed us up), everything about thier demeanor changed and there was a differet standard of care, different assumptions. I doubt they would have done it without asking if they had known I was Lisa's client. Not sure how much good my birth plan would have done (although it didn't really say anything different than any of Lia's other clients and her general rule is ask first)<br><br>
formula - absolutely unessecary, nursery totally unessecary unless they actualy hooked him up to monitors for some reason, I have never ever heard of this and we have two major hospitals. heb B refusal, probably pretty normal bullying tactics unfortunately. infant burrito - probably habit. cord cutting, I would think they needed to get things moving so they could sew you back up. but that is a guess. I don't know much about emergancy c-births but my guess is that you probably had some different nurses who hadn't read your birth plan.<br><br>
you really never can trust a birth plan. That is more between you and your Dr./MW you need an advocate who will literally stand up and stand in the way for your rights.<br><br>
I am so sorry things did not go as you planned. I hope you and your baby can heal and grow through this experiance. How is nursing going? I hope there wee no problems caused but the bottle feeding. man that is what would really tick me off is the nursery and bottle feeding.
 

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My hospital births were nothing like that. I know they usually don't give the mom babe directly after a cs, but the rest of you experience should be related to the customer care center or the like because it was absolutly horrid and insulting to you and your family.<br>
Both my boys were hosp. births. Different hospitals and different docs. (hubby's military). And this next birth will also be a hospital birth, that's all insurance will cover. At both times all my wishes were made clear and conceise from the get go and any deviation was immediatly checked by me! Even the evil nurse who insisted on not only coming in and checking my breathing and what not every 3 hours, but telling me her life story and how baby can't be in bed with me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: , got the boot ASAP!<br>
I do think some hospitals get over zellous about what they can do, and assume noone will challenge thier routine. Not many ppl. know how to make sure their desires are clear, and that they even have a choice in the matter! And I don't think many check any sort of hospital stay plan unless it has been verbaly iterated to the charge nurse, which is what I've done every time I've gone in.<br>
I'm sorry to hear you had such a terrible time, neither you nor babe should have been through that. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/heartbeat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="heartbeat">
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi, everyone,<br><br>
Thank you for all your compassionate and informative replies. I feel more validated now. A family member had told me to just get over it because there was nothing I could do about it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/angry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="angry"><br><br>
The midwife knew she'd screwed up when I mentioned the eye stuff because she apologized. Both midwife and doula were with me the whole time but I think they were more focused on making sure I was okay. I think my doula was exhausted also after spending 2 days with me laboring. No DP--I'm a single mom. But both the midwife and doula were quite familiar with my birth plan and I know copies were brought to the hospital when we had to go there. I guess I could have been more assertive but exhaustion, drugs, and wanting what's best for the baby really guided my judgement on what I allowed and why I didn't say more at the time. I really don't think there was any malice on their part, probably they just were in their routine groove but I'm still very disappointed.<br><br>
On a happy note, breastfeeding is going great, baby is healthy, and we are happily bonded. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I think what is "typical" really varies by hospital and even by the luck of the draw when it comes to who is on staff that day</td>
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I agree. As a Doula in a hopsital that is still fairly new to Doulas I have seen a nurse bully her way into getting a patient who was induced an epidural and not allowing her out of bed(the nurse would have kicked me out has I pushed further than I did). At the next one the client was induced yet allowed to do whatever she wanted, even go in the shower for an hour while hooked up. She stood for 5 hours before consenting to an epidural because she could not stand any longer and sitting/laying was impossible. She was 10cm 15minutes after the epidural was put in and the baby was born 30minutes later. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:<br><br>
Vit K - if the nurse taking care of the baby had not known about the birth plan then it would have been automatic that she do it.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I also said baby was to remain with me....but they insisted on taking her away and keeping her in the nursery the first night "in case she chokes." Choke on what?</td>
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Choking on mucous, IF she sounded mucousy and had alot. Babies born vaginally have alot of it squeezed out during delivery, but a fast delivery or a c-section they don't get the same effects. They can be very mucousy after birth and require suctioning. My youngest dd was like this, she was monitored for 24hours after a horrid birth. A very mucousy baby will have alot of rattling while they're breathing, anyone can hear it without equipment. Some babies they want to monitor anyhow. However, the baby should have been bf'd to break up the mucous faster. When my dd was in the isolette they brought her to me a few times to try and force her to eat to help break up the mucous so they would not have to suction her.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">With a c-section, is there a medical reason why they need to cut the cord and wrap up your baby like a burrito with a hat before "allowing" you to see her and not even hold her right away?</td>
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No, your wishes should have been met.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Are they always so snarky when you politely refuse the hep B shot -- about a million times, too?</td>
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Yes.<br><br>
anything that goes against what they normally do will be met with resistance. Here they do not give Hep B at birth, it is done at age 11 AFTER parents have signed permission slips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CarrieMF</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br><br><br>
Choking on mucous, IF she sounded mucousy and had alot. Babies born vaginally have alot of it squeezed out during delivery, but a fast delivery or a c-section they don't get the same effects. They can be very mucousy after birth and require suctioning.</div>
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Ohhh....that makes sense. Thank you for clearing that up. She was making some weird grunty noises that one of the nurses on the previous shift had been concerned about. I was wondering how she could choke when she hadn't eaten.<br><br>
Too bad nurses bully patients; that's not right. I'd say my case was more of not being listened to than bullied but still it feels pretty bad. Someone told me that giving me the baby immediately after the c-section would not have been possible because they needed to sew me up quickly and any pressure on my chest could have caused uncontrollable bleeding. But still....I kept asking for my baby when I was lying there and they kept saying they were cleaning her up and I'd see her in a minute and I kept saying, no I want to see her now. Ah well. They were nice enough, they were just hell-bent on doing it their way.<br><br>
I'm going to go cry now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Thank you again.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> That just sucks. I've had 2 hospital births and the only bullying they've done was over some pain meds when I was in labor. But they generally let me do what I want to do, and anything I refuse is ok. But rooming-in is standard there, and they don't give hep B shots at birth in Canada anyways.<br><br>
I feel so bad for you. Definitely, definitely complain.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/angry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="angry"> OMG, I am so sorry that happened to you...<br><br>
Unreal...<br><br>
Well, not, not really...but still...<br><br>
Uggh...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks again, mamas, for your support!<br><br>
Well this is interesting -- seems I was randomly selected by the hospital to fill out a feedback survey on their services. I'll have to fill that out and send it in. Wonder what I should say?? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
I hope this blue feeling gets better. I'll probably never have a chance to have another child so I need to find a way to make the best of this birth experience. Some days I keep thinking this was my fault for not just pushing her out and being more resolved and less fearful about doing it but I'm trying not to go there.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CarrieMF</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Choking on mucous, IF she sounded mucousy and had alot. Babies born vaginally have alot of it squeezed out during delivery, but a fast delivery or a c-section they don't get the same effects. They can be very mucousy after birth and require suctioning. My youngest dd was like this, she was monitored for 24hours after a horrid birth. A very mucousy baby will have alot of rattling while they're breathing, anyone can hear it without equipment. Some babies they want to monitor anyhow. However, the baby should have been bf'd to break up the mucous faster. When my dd was in the isolette they brought her to me a few times to try and force her to eat to help break up the mucous so they would not have to suction her.</div>
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That makes sense. My second was a fast birth and did end up choking on mucus. but it happened almost immediantly after birth (10 minutes maybe). But it would have been very bad if I had been sleping when it happened. it was still a while before we noticed she had stopped breathing. But if my midwife would have acknowldeged this was possible we woul dhave just suctioned her more and gotten it out.<br><br>
There is certainly no reason why she couldn't be with you if you were awake, and be brought to you when she wanted to eat.
 

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Yep, sounds like a hospital. In my pre-mom days I was a RN, all the nurses used to stand around and make fun of the birth plans, that was if they actaully read them at all, usually they just disappeared. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: Complain, complain, and complain some more.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AMB8301</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Yep, sounds like a hospital. In my pre-mom days I was a RN, all the nurses used to stand around and make fun of the birth plans, that was if they actaully read them at all, usually they just disappeared. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: Complain, complain, and complain some more.</div>
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That is what I thought hospitals did with birth plans.<br><br>
That is why I tell people who have high hopes for their well thought out birth plans to save their energy and have their baby at home.<br><br>
JMHO.
 
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