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I've recently found out I'm pg with twins (just 6.5w so far) and already I'm worrying about the birth.<br><br>
I hate hospitals and I hate having to deal with medical personnel I don't know.<br><br>
With my son (4 1/2) I had an independent midwife, and would have had a homebirth but after a DVT was on bloodthinners and so had to go into hospital in case of PPH.<br><br>
But it was fine, with my own midwife, went into labout at 41+4 and had DS in less than 4 hours. No need for continuousl monitoring or anything of that sort. He fed just after birth, and we were home within a few hours.<br><br>
I envisaged the same again, but I fear that in an NHS hospital they may well insist on all sorts of things that I will hate - continuous monitoring, lots of people in the room, neonatal team etc.<br><br>
Obviously of any of us were at risk, this may be necessary. But I am still hoping that if all is straightforward, we could still have the birth we want.<br><br>
I'm on bloodthinners again, so still high risk in that respect.<br><br>
Can anyone tell me about UK twin births?<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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<a href="http://www.vbac.co.uk/stories/story.php?s=sarah2" target="_blank">http://www.vbac.co.uk/stories/story.php?s=sarah2</a><br><br>
have you checked out <a href="http://www.hombirth.org.uk?" target="_blank">www.hombirth.org.uk?</a>
 

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Not in the UK, but I have read their main midwifery textbook that most midwives have been trained with. The textbook pretty much thinks twins are highrisk, and should be in a hospital. Doesn't outright say it, but it's implied. And it says there should be a minimum of 3 midwives delivering.
 

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I am an NHS midwife and attended a beautiful twin birth in February, where the mother laboured in the pool, with intermittent monitoring and birthed her first daughter on a birthing stool. She had planned to be in all fours for the second twin but chose not to be at the time. There was one doctor in attendance, three midwives (she knew all of us and was happy for us to be there we didn't need us all) and a student midwife and the doctor did very little. It can happen<br>
Presumably you will have antenatal care from your independent midwife and she will accompany you into the hospital so you will have a strong advocate. You can try and agree a birth plan in advance probably not with the obstetricians but maybe with a consultant midwife/ head of midwifery/ supervisor of midwives . If you can't agree a birth plan remember it's your right to decline anything they want to do and insist that people stay out of your room.<br>
Where are you in the UK? you are likely to get far more joy in London than in say *******.
 

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I just wanted to write to re-assure you that it is completely possible. I had twins at home with NHS midwives in June. I live in Sheffield and was lucky to have babies in a good position and understanding midwives. We talked in a lot of detail about both home and hospital birth scenarios and we used the guidelines recommended by Mary Cronk (a leading independant midwife), see <a href="http://www.marycronkmidwiferyservices.co.uk" target="_blank">http://www.marycronkmidwiferyservices.co.uk</a>. These were really useful to take in to my midwife's supervisor and sit down and discuss. I politely listened to the obstrecians view point but made it clear that I wanted to pursue a birth with minimum intervention and that I believed the interventions suggested by him (eg continous monitoring) would have progressive knock on effects on my ability to labour well. The midwives were supportive that if I had to labour in hospital it would be in the midwife led unit, no doctors present unless medically called for and that I would be allowed to use the birth pool. In the event I made the 37 week mark and was all clear for a home water birth. We had 3 amazing NHS midwives and a fantasic independant midwife present (I was not techincally under her care but she had been incredibly supportive and helpful in giving advice to both me and the midwives).<br><br>
The midwives and doctors can only advise you, they can not force you to have continous monitoring etc. I would really advise you to sit down and research the implications of various interventions and consider what the differing risks and benefits are and then decide what is right for you.<br><br>
Additionally out of personal experience I would advise caution about monthly growth scans (assuming you are pregnant with fraternal twins - identical twins have additional risks and mine were non-id so my experience is not very relevent to that).<br>
Anyway I agreed to regular scans as I thought was that if everything was going well it would actually reassure the medical staff that all was well and they might give me an easier time over having a homebirth. To be very brief I was nearly pressured into an induction as they thought that one baby had stopped growing where as in truth she had moved down in my pelvis and couldn't be measured well. When they were born at 37 wks they were 6,6 and 6,3 so barely any difference and very good weights for twins. Scans are notoriously inaccurate and done routinely for no good reason can in effect pick up on problems that are not there. I was a fool to agree to it and my babes were born earlier because of it. I delayed the induction but felt I couldn't ignore their warnings (which were very extreme) and so went to an acupuncturist and had a memebrane sweep and laboured that day. Left to myself I think the bubbas would have had another week of womb growing.<br><br>
A useful information source about Uk midwifery is,<br><a href="http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/ukmidwifery" target="_blank">http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/ukmidwifery</a><br>
which I found really useful.<br><br>
Hope all goes well and I would be more than happy to answer any questions you have,<br><br>
fay
 
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