Mothering Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,705 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
DD and I were talking about HSing today, and it turns out she's much more comfortable having "real school work" to do, adn a certain amount of structure, though she still wants tons of free time to play on Webkins and read fiction. We're going to a "Poetry in the Park" activity through the local HS group, and she memorized a poem for that, plus we're now in a Creative Writing Class through the same group (and taught by my Mom so for DD this particular class isn't optional!). She seems to like having academic goals to meet, as long as the time pressure isn't too intense.<br><br>
So how exactly do I go about all this? I will definitely include DD in the process, but I'm not sure exactly what materials I should be purchasing, or what's a reasonable academic goal per time period. This year, I have a math text that we've borrowed, but I think my friend will need it back next year. This means I'll need to actually purchase something, and I'm not sure what to get or where to get it. Do I really need a textbook in anything other than math?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,647 Posts
what about doing unit studies? find paperwork type things that center around what is interesting her at the time. To me that has always seemed like a good compromise between un and schooling.<br><br>
oddly enough, on math, my sister (die-hard home SCHOOLER) uses a computer program instead of textbook.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,005 Posts
Why not have her make a list things she wants to study over the next year? Then help her make goals related to that. Then help facilitate her learning through internet research, library books, people, etc. It may be some work, but will help show her how to seek information and how to set and meet goals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Why don't you let <i>her</i> pick out the materials she would like to use for whatever subjects she feels drawn to? There are tons of samples online for all of the curriculum options out there. Plus, your local library could be of assistance, too.<br><br>
I recently bought a used Saxon Math Curriculum for my ds who said he wanted to "work on math daily from a book". It lasted two days...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> But I'm gonna keep them in case he changes his mind. Sooo glad I bought em used!<br><br>
Maybe keep it really simple with some loaned material (from your hs group or library) and see if this sort of structure works for her. Try some unit studies. You could always take it a step further from there if she likes it.<br><br>
Ultimately, not matter how structured she becomes, if the choice for structure is truly hers, than she's still unschooling <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
I recently came across a link for <a href="http://oldfashionededucation.com/index.html" target="_blank">An Old Fashioned Education</a> and I have fallen in love. It would probably be a good place to start given that it is free (including a link to a free online math curriculum which looks pretty good IMO...click on the first link under Arithmetic).<br><br>
The site designer has a curriculum broken down by day/week by grade level so have your DD look at that and see if that interests her...but you could also pick and choose based on her interests as well. That would be a good place to start so that you could figure out what works for your DD and go from there. Then you could implement as much structure as you both feel comfortable with.<br><br>
Steph
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,840 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>papayapetunia</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7888159"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Why not have her make a list things she wants to study over the next year? Then help her make goals related to that. Then help facilitate her learning through internet research, library books, people, etc. It may be some work, but will help show her how to seek information and how to set and meet goals.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<span><br>
Pretty good advice, IMO, and along the lines of what I was thinking as I read the first post. Find out what things she has in mind, help her state them for herself, and then be available to help her as she needs/wants it. I have to be honest though, it's still unschooling to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"></span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,840 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>earthluvinmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7888161"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Ultimately, not matter how structured she becomes, if the choice for structure is truly hers, than she's still unschooling <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<span>Yes to that! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Unschooling and structure are not enemies. It just depends on who is deciding.</span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,705 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>NatureMama3</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7888105"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">what about doing unit studies? find paperwork type things that center around what is interesting her at the time. To me that has always seemed like a good compromise between un and schooling.<br><br>
oddly enough, on math, my sister (die-hard home SCHOOLER) uses a computer program instead of textbook.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Do you have a link to what she uses? I wonder if it's included in the resources linked in the other link I quoted below.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>tuffykenwell</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7888507"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I recently came across a link for <a href="http://oldfashionededucation.com/index.html" target="_blank">An Old Fashioned Education</a> and I have fallen in love. It would probably be a good place to start given that it is free (including a link to a free online math curriculum which looks pretty good IMO...click on the first link under Arithmetic).<br><br>
The site designer has a curriculum broken down by day/week by grade level so have your DD look at that and see if that interests her...but you could also pick and choose based on her interests as well. That would be a good place to start so that you could figure out what works for your DD and go from there. Then you could implement as much structure as you both feel comfortable with.<br><br>
Steph</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Wow! That's a complete list! I can even deal with the big cross on the site- and it's easy enough to NOT click on their "creationism" or "bible studies" resources.<br><br>
It's going to take me some time to go through all those resources and select the ones that will work for DD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,705 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>NatureMama3</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7889795"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">she uses a program called Eduss.<br><br><a href="http://www.eduss.com:2099/" target="_blank">http://www.eduss.com:2099/</a></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
OK, so it's something to purchase, not free online resources.<br><br>
I can't seem to find out how much it costs without giving them all my contact info. About how much would a 7th grade math curriculum cost?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,647 Posts
didn't know, so called and asked her. she couldn't remember exaclty, but it was at least $300 and it covered every grade in grade school (not high school).<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> she's going to get excited and think I'm looking to not unschool. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,976 Posts
<span>You might find some fun materials together in the <a href="http://www.fun-books.com/" target="_blank">FUN-Books catalog</a>! It's especially put together with unschoolers in mind, although it's great for anyone! Books, games, all sorts of stuff that was chosen with the intent of encouraging life-long learners. I love it - I think it's by far the best catalog around! A lot of the things we used through the years are in it (maybe because it used to be The John Holt Book & Music Store Catalog and was later sold to FUN by Holt Press).<br><br>
For free online resources, take a browse through this large set of annotated links:<br><a href="http://besthomeschooling.org/gateway/intedws.html" target="_blank">Homeschooling Gateway to the Internet</a><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Lillian<br><br></span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,705 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Ah, so I'd have to purchase all the grades DD is already done with just to get the ones she still needs? Ah, ok, this one's not for me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
If your library is any good, any book you could POSSIBLY "need" will be there. You can also post to your local craigslist looking for college textbooks that kids can't sell back to the bookstore. Things like biology, chemistry, and physics, algebra, philosophy, and history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,647 Posts
I'm not sure, to be honest. you may be able to buy it separately, but she has kids all over the spectrum (3, 8, 12) and house shares with another family (kids 4, 6, 10, 12) so they needed all the grades. you might be able to buy separately?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
868 Posts
Hi Ruthla, I consider ds and I to be on the unschooling end of things, but I still do structure his day and his learning more than most definitions of unschooling allow for. I figure, if it works for us, who cares about the theory, that's why we left the school system.<br><br>
What we do is a combination of things. We've combined doing large projects (he's previously done a design your own island project, this year it's design your own planet. His first thought was to have life based on another element than carbon, this has led to him having to research organic chemistry a bit to find out why, exactly, life is carbon-based, so it's still a very unschooly kind of way to do things, just narrowed down a bit so he can handle it and not just sit around saying "I don't know what to do".)<br><br>
I also put together a list of books I'd like him to read, with some "suggestions" as to which ones he could be reading now. I joined some online reading groups and we are doing some of the fiction reads together (currently he's reading Huck Finn for the classics reading group, and James and the Giant Peach for the banned books group.)<br><br>
For writing when he was younger, we did dictation, just a few minutes a day, but it really worked wonders with both his handwriting and his grammar and spelling. I would read a sentence out loud and he would have to write it down from hearing it, so he'd have to figure out how to spell the words and punctuate, etc. It really worked fantastically well for him, much better than any workbook or program that we tried. Now that he's older, he doesn't have much patience for the dictation, so we're trying him keeping a daily journal. He hasn't quite gotten around to starting that yet, so maybe I have to give him a bit of a nudge <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">:<br><br>
I've bought a few small scale kind of programs, that ds gets into occasionally, plus a subscription to Learning through History magazine, that he loves. It has essays and research questions, crafts and recipes and similar "real work" kind of curriculum stuff in it. I bought a time-line book, but I don't think we'll get started on that until next winter, it's too nice out right now for indoor work.<br><br>
For the summer, I've planned for ds to do lots of nature walks, finding specimens and trying to indentify plants, animal tracks, and keeping a journal of what he finds and how he's come to conclusions. He likes to fish, so I've suggested that he try to keep a fishing journal too, keep track of lures that worked, bait, good fishing spots, etc. This kind of journalling not only covers language arts, but also science, math, social science, art (drawing specimens), phys ed (all that walking and hiking) plus he gets to hang out with the boys fishing (that dreaded socialization). If he were more interested in writing (how did I wind up with this kid? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">) I would sign him up for some of the writing workshops our library puts on for teens.<br><br>
This fall he's going to join the sea cadets, play football and maybe take an improv comedy class through a theater school he's attended before.<br><br>
I chose a book for us to read aloud together, ds didn't want to keep doing this, but I really love this part of hsing and insisted, and it turns out that he's really enjoying it too, we're reading The Once and Future King.<br><br>
I put together a plan quarterly, based on the seasons. We've been hsing for so long, and there are no other schooling kids in our family so we really don't need to follow the school calendar anymore. We do more outside, experimental stuff in the summer, more reading and research in the winter when we can't go outside much. It gives both of us a framework, and keeps us both on track.<br><br>
He requested a math program this year, because he's had so much trouble with math in the past, so I got him Math-U-See. He's really enjoying that program so far, it's very basic, not colourful, no pictures, no games, exactly what he asked for (!!), because he finds the "make learning fun" kind of stuff is distracting and annoying. We started with the division level, because he's struggled to learn division for 4 years now, he says this program is really helping to make it make sense to him.<br><br><br>
Wow this is getting really long, probably more info than you wanted, so I'll sign off here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ruthla</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7890199"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">OK, so it's something to purchase, not free online resources.<br><br>
I can't seem to find out how much it costs without giving them all my contact info. About how much would a 7th grade math curriculum cost?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
We have a math computer game that we got for about $80, that's supposed to cover k-12, I think there is a separate one for algebra. It's set up as a board game and is basically for math drill. Now that I think about it, it could seem really stupid to a 7th grader.<br><br><a href="http://www.edalive.com/" target="_blank">It's on this site</a>, though, if you want to look at it. There are free downloads so you can test it out.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top