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So........our children showed up for summer school today. This is a totally unscientific thing, of course, but don't you think when you have a classroom with *seven* children who just completed the 3rd grade and *three* of them have classic autism, that it's an epidemic?? (These are children from all over the district. There is one other 3rd gr. summer school classroom, I don't know if there are any kids with autism in that room.)<br><br>
These children would have been born in 1995. (We did little 'all about me' books today and all of them are 10 or will be sometime this year.)<br><br>
And I would almost bet every child in the class had the routine vaccination schedule for kids their age.<br><br>
The other thing I find *interesting* is.......when I was an infant, the only REQUIRED vaccinations on the schedule were polio and DTP. Now, for my son, he at 8 mos. old is up to date so far, and he has had 3 IPV, 3 DTP, 3 Hep B, 3 HIB, and 3 Prevnar. That's the 2, 4, 6 MONTH schedule!! That's FIFTEEN vaccinations for SEVEN diseases!<br><br>
When *I* was a child, there were no autistic kids in my school. Now, it's almost weird if you DON'T have an autistic child in your grade at school. It just really hit me today with half the class having autism that *something* has to be causing this..........and I think I know what the 'something' is. It's a very sad thought............I just HOPE and PRAY it isn't already too late for *MY* baby.
 

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I don't know how many autistic kids were in my school as a kid because they would have been in a totally separate, self-contained special ed section where we never saw them. Lots of things have changed over the years.<br><br>
Why are these kids in summer school - are these a select group of "at-risk" kids or something?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>amnesiac</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't know how many autistic kids were in my school as a kid because they would have been in a totally separate, self-contained special ed section where we never saw them. Lots of things have changed over the years.</div>
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this *is* true, but it also cannot be denied that autism has increased exponentially in the last decade or so - which is more what zakers_mama is referring to (i think!).
 

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That's for sure - you had to see all the kids in my son's special preschool. And that's just ONE of the many special schools on Long Island alone dealing with autistic children, as well as other related disorders (i.e. ADD/ADHD).<br><br>
The fact that states are having to build schools devoted entirely to autistic children is telling.
 

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What I mean is this - for me personally it's difficult to judge unscientifically what historical changes in my immediate area have been like because 1) the reason I mentioned above and 2) I don't see autistic kids here like you are seeing in your community. Who knows what, if anything, that says about this specific area. I know that the it clearly is on the rise, but does anyone have an idea how that rate of increase varies from one geographic area to another?
 

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IMHO, it may be a combination of things, but I definately agree that the mercury in the vaxes play a big part in this. But our children are eating more chemicals and hormones **drink your milk** than I did as a child. (I'm 31) The enviornmental toxins have trickled into everything--the water, the air, the food supply, the fish. Kids today are overwhelmed. Its not just manifesting as autism either, now there is ADHD, ADD, juvenille psychosis, and a whole host of allergies and asthma.<br><br>
Thats my $.02.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>amnesiac</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't know how many autistic kids were in my school as a kid because they would have been in a totally separate, self-contained special ed section where we never saw them. Lots of things have changed over the years.<br><br>
True, when I was in school, the 'special-ed' kids for the whole district were in a self-contained class in the middle school. Then, they changed to having them at schools appropriate for their age when I was in high school, but we still never saw them.<br><br>
Some of the children I have now attend school in a regular age-appropriate classroom with one-on-one help. (One boy who I know has autism isn't coming till the 15th, I actually don't know if he even has the one-on-one assistant.)<br><br>
Why are these kids in summer school - are these a select group of "at-risk" kids or something?</div>
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They attend summer school because they are in some sort of special ed class during the rest of the school year, either self-contained, pull-out resource help, or both. (yes, some kids from the self-contained rooms go to resource and regular ed now for parts of their day.) The teachers from their special ed programs recommend them for summer school, the parents make the final decision on whether or not they will go. (Some parents like their kids to have the break. Also, it's totally optional, so if the parents want to take a vacation for a week or 2 during summer school, it's fine.) Basically it is to help them keep the skills they have learned during the school year--if you've ever worked with kids in any kind of special ed, you know that some of them *really need* to keep in the 'school' routine, and they can easily forget things they are just beginning to learn. They attend summer school from 8:30-noon Tues., Wed. and Thurs, starting after a 12 day break and ending about 2 weeks before they go back to regular school.<br><br><br><br><br>
But it wasn't just that the autistic kids went to school somewhere else, it's that even 20 years ago, there just weren't as many autistic kids! And I honestly don't think it was that we didn't know what it was, ANYBODY would notice if their kid quit talking and started behaving strangely--ie, spinning, hand-flapping, rocking, screaming, extreme resistance to change...<br><br>
I work with the district early childhood program. They have 2 'behavior specialists' just at the school *I* work at whose entire job is to work with the preschoolers who have autism and their challenging behaviors. There is one classroom where in the morning, it is 6 preschoolers with severe autism. (think little/no independent, meaningful speech, extremely challenging behaviors, the 'classic autism' hand-flapping, rocking 'stimming'. self-contained class students) There are also 2 more kids I know of for sure who are diagnosed autistic--and that's just counting the one in my class and another whose class EA told me she's autistic. (these 2 are kids who will likely go to a regular classroom with one-on-one help.) I don't know how many more there are who I haven't seen or talked to their teachers.<br><br>
Anyway that's at LEAST 8 kids out of 60 who are autistic. There's also 40 kids in the afternoon program. As far as I know there aren't any with autism in that afternoon bunch.<br>
Now....let's count in that there are most likely a couple kids I don't know about. I don't see every class and every child who goes to early childhood in my school. (the only reason I know about the child who's not in the 'autism class' is I asked her class EA why she was coming to school all day and she told me it was to get her used to the routine of full-day school for kindergarten and she's autistic. I don't go around asking everyone 'got any kids with autism?')<br><br>
so that's 100 kids who come to preschool at the school I work at. (5 classrooms, morning and afternoon programs) 10 children with autism, if you count the fact that I know for sure about 8 and there's probably at least 2 I don't know about. That's 1 in 10 kids with autism. (Of course, this is also a sample entirely of children with some sort of developmental delay, that's how they qualify for free public preschool, IDEA law.)<br><br>
I know at the school I used to work at, it was about the same situation, they had a classroom for severly autistic kids.<br><br>
Another fact: In the school district I work at, the special-ed people have set up an 'Autism team' of people specially trained to provide the educational diagnosis and plan those children's IEP's and accomodations. There are different people who work at every level from preschool to high school.<br>
The district also provides a special day-long training for all the people who work with children with autism. They don't do this for any other disability, to my knowledge. To me, that suggests autism has hit epidemic proportions, they NEED all this because there are so many children with autism.<br><br>
A little strange, don't you think, that even 10-15 years ago, they didn't need 'autism teams?'<br><br>
As I said earlier, "I will reconsider my position on vaccinations when the President bans the use of all toxic metals in vaccines." I seriously think somewhere in the increase in vaccinations in the last 20 years, we have the answer to why there is now an autism epidemic.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">A little strange, don't you think, that even 10-15 years ago, they didn't need 'autism teams?'</td>
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Like I said before, lots of things have changed in education for those with differing abilities. Just because we may have services now that we didn't 20 years ago doesn't necesarily mean they weren't "needed" then.<br><br>
There's no doubt that the number of autistic kids has increased at the national level & in some communities. I don't see the severity you're describing in my own community so perhaps there is variation in the rate of increase from region to region?<br><br>
For me personally, yeah mercury is a bad thing & I don't choose to intentionally be exposed - either via injection or ingestion. I don't get thimerosal preserved shots, but I also don't eat seafood & I don't live near one of these:<br><a href="http://www.catf.us/publications/view/32" target="_blank">http://www.catf.us/publications/view/32</a><br><br>
I wish that were the case for every child - to live in a mercury free environment.
 

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When I studied psych in school in the early 90's, autism was one page in an abnormal psych book, citing 1:10,000 kids. Here, a decade to 15 years later, that number is now 1:166. First thing I checked was did the DSM change to perhaps include a more broad base of kids for the diagnosis. No, it didn't. Actually, more stuff has been added on to the spectrum since I was in school. The whole spectrum is full of kids who have this plus this but not that so they can't be cookie cutter this but they are definitely not all right either, so now we have to call them that....<br><br>
I'd say, heredity/genetics, enviro toxins, and "other" toxins all play a role in the autism epidemic. I think if you are genetically predisposed to certain things like not being able to digest and metabolize certain proteins for example, then you may also not be able to properly eliminate the neurotoxins found in some vaccines. If that is the case, then vaccines did take a part in being the reason you are autistic.<br><br>
Here's an anecdotal aside for ya: we went to the playground yesterday. Out of 9 kids playing, 2 were autistic. Granted, I made special arrangements to meet the mama and other child, but even if they weren't there, it still would have been 1 out of 8 kids there that day. And that is with me assuming all the other kids were "normal" (I used normal as a distinction for not being autistic in this case).
 
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