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Take my opinion for what it's worth.. but I think your ped is jumping the gun.

I think he's a bit too young to say that he has language delays... especially since you feel that he can understand some things. My dd wasn't saying anything but mama and dada at 1... and she wasn't using them frequently at all. She's 17 months and still what I would call "behind" on the language curve, but I don't think she is delayed.. I think it's just her. She didn't start waiving at stuff until around 14/15 months... then she just started waving and saying bye bye out of the blue. I can't honestly remember about the pointing, but she truly only did something when *she* wanted to
She's a stubborn old bird. Even now if I take her into the ped I have to take what they say with a grain of salt sometimes... just because she won't do anything in front of them doesn't mean she can't do it... she's just stubborn like that, and she will do it if she *wants* to do it


I would give it a bit more time. Many, many kids have bursts of development at different times. When he's 18 months if you feel he is still significanly behind, then address it. Obviously he's not behind on the walking stuff if he is cruising... sounds right on par with that.

Please try not to worry too much mama. FWIW I think that peds sometimes assume all babies/toddlers are these cookie cutter textbook people who all do everything at the same time. We all know that is not true... they have their own pace with stuff. Trust your gut a bit on this one... give him a few more months for language development, if you are still worried at his next check up then bring it up. If he has learned a couple of new words by then, he's probably just fine!
 

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I think your pediatrician is crazy...well a little maybe...

At one year dd could point, but she didn't wave. She still doesn't give kisses. I have been working on signs only for a couple of months and the only one she has picked up on readily is "milk". The whole following commands is kind of sketchy to me...if I ask her to bring me that book she has in her hand, she'll most likely laugh and run the opposite way. So technically she knows what I'm saying, but not following my direction, kwim?

I haven't gone to the pediatrician in a while to make sure she's on par with other one year olds, but your ds sounds like a healthy and on track toddler.
 

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Could it be that your son has a hearing disorder? I know that sometimes a hearing loss can be a silent cause of receptive/expressive language delay -- although your ped might indeed be jumping the gun. Maybe just get it checked out just in case?

Quote:

Originally Posted by annT
X-Posted to Parenting

Guys, we just had our one-year pediatrician visit, and I'm a bit upset. It would really help me out if you could tell me what your babe did at one year.

My one-year-old son is not pointing or waving at all, despite seeing me do it. I have also been signing with him for months (focusing on a few simple signs, and repeating them every day), and he hasn't picked up on any signs. He has no words, other than "mama" (which he uses mostly when distressed, and which sounds more like "muhamamama").

He is an incredibly happy, incredibly loving child. He's clearly intensely attached to me and to his dad. He loves to be held and cuddled, he gives open-mouth kisses, and he smiles, giggles, and laughs. He's very interested in other children, loves to look at pictures of babies, loves to look in the mirror, and loves animals. He makes a barking noise whenever he sees a dog. He also reaches for objects, and occasionally shows me what he wants via gestures (for example, closing a book in my hands if he doesn't want me to read it to him). He's extremely vocal, and spends almost the whole day babbling (mama, wawa, dada, gaga), cooing, and shrieking happily.

His gross motor skills are average - he's cruising, pulling to a stand, climbing, always on the move.

The ped was concerned that he cannot follow simple commands (bring me the book, show me the doggy, where is dada). I answered honestly and said that I don't think he understands me when I say things like that. He clearly understands words like "up," because when I say it he strains his whole body upward, but that's about it.

The ped said that he appears to have delays in both his receptive and expressive language capabilities, based on the description I just gave you. Although I had *noticed* the pointing/waving issue, and his lack of understanding re: commands, I was somewhat blind-sided by the ped's statement, as well as by the ped's concern (and this is a very laid-back ped).

As we think about where to go from here, it would really help me to know just how atypical his development is. What was your one-year-old doing? Does this kid sound even remotely like any of your boys?

Thanks, and I'm sorry this is so long.
 

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My son will be a year old August 10th. Right now, he says "mama, dada, baba, and something that sounds like "tight", and lots of jabbering in his own made up language. He crawls like crazy, stands up, but doesn't cruise. He'll take a few steps assisted, but thats it. He waves, shakes his head, "dances", smiles, giggles, everything babies do. What happens when he's around strangers? NOTHING. He pretty much clams up, and will bury his face in Mama's neck if he's being held. Your son sounds very much like my son, and no one's ever told us they think he has a problem. I think its more likely your baby is shy and doesn't feel the need to perform like a trained animal at a ped visit. I also think your ped's expectations about following commands are too high. Maybe you could make a video of your son going through a normal day at home, so the ped has a better idea of how your son really acts.
 

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hmmm, my son is almost 2 and doesn't point a lot. The thing that concerns ME about him is that he doesn't point to pics in books--but I think that's MY thing. I TRY not to 'drill' him and if he doesn't get something, I move on...only I haven't gone back and worked with that much. Like if I say 'where's the puppy?' he won't point it out, but he says 'woof, woof' I'm trying not to be overly concerned though because he DOES follow commands like "throw this in the trash" and "please go turn off the TV" And if I ask things like 'where's your blankie' he'll go find it, and he knows where his eyes, ears, hair, mouth, nose, arm, hands, belly button, and toes all are.
I *almost* want to take him to the eye doc to see if maybe there's something up with his eyesight? I have bad eyesight...

He waved at a year and had maybe 2 signs? and a couple words--I know for sure he said mama and baba (daddy in arabic) then, and I know he signed milk for sure, probably 'more' too. I think eat came shortly after a year, maybe at a year. He gave kisses, he clapped to music, he walked and danced at a year.

As somebody working with EI, I can say it does wonders for kids--for the little ones under 3 it's usually someone who comes to your house and works with your child with you there and everything, for a half hour or so a couple times a week. If you're curious, go have him tested. Worst case scenario, he has a speech therapist play with him for a few months.
Or you can wait a few months and just see if he starts talking more.
up to you...if it were me, I'd probably take the free eval, especially if I know the doc isn't the type to flip about 'nothing'....
 

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My dd turned one on 7/3, and while she has been waving for a while, other things made me wonder if she was developing behind the norm (she's my third, the first two were pretty consistent with each other). I signed with her since she was about 7 mos old, and it took about 4 months before she'd consistently sign milk. She's just now addiing new signs (3-4). She doesn't point yet, and while she used to say mama, dada, and brujs (brothers), she now just calls everyone mama - it's kind of funny, but something in the back of my mind thinks she shouldn't be regressing already! Instead of trying words she just says 'hmmnh?' (with her mouth closed), all day long for everything.

However, I have noticed a huge developmental change in her in just the last three weeks - besides walking, she has become very good at nodding yes and no, following commands (simple things, like "let's go night-night" and she puts her head down), and she has become obsessed with looking at books, where a month ago she wouldn't sit still long enough for one page. She is a completely different person in a month.

Also, I have noticed with my kids and have friends who observe that kids tend to focus on one or two skill areas at a time, and then cycle through - from babyhood through, well, our oldest kids are 6 & 7, and they still do it. So while you might see a whole lot of physical development at once, less verbal development will be going on. Or if they are really making progress signing or pointing, then maybe motor skills have plateaued for a while.

I think your son sounds normal, but I'm not an expert. There may be a hearing or other developmental thing going on with your ds. Would you feel comfortable waiting one or two months, to see what progress he makes?

Did your ped make a recommendation for further eval?
 

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Your son sounds just like my son when he was one and he was way vocal too high speech. My son didn't walk til 2 months after his first b-day.

I wouldn't worry. He improved alot by eighteen months and now he's almost 2 he's very smart.
 

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It sounds like your Ped is overreacting. I HATE when Western Docs instill worry in moms for no reason. My son will be 1 on Friday, and he doesn't wave all that often, and I've never seen him point. He lifts his arms up to be held, and vigorously shakes his head no when he doesn't want something. The books I've read state that this is normal behavior. It didn't occur to me to worry that ds is behind. Although he is doing some things more slowly, like he didn't crawl until after 10 months. Now he's all over the place and cruising. He says dada and mama. I totally wouldn't worry if I were you. This is one reason why I don't take ds to Western Docs...
:
 

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I agree that your Ped is jumping the gun a bit. The range of *normal* is much greater than what is suggested in textbooks, and so many babies are all over the development map at age 1.

DD is 1, and waves but does not point, says dada and mama but that's it, cruises and climbs but doesn't walk. I'm not worried, and neither are her healthcare providers. DS did not crawl at all, and drs were concerned, but he went on to walk early and develop normally, and is actually ahead of the curve (not that those charts mean much). A friends daughter did not walk until she was almost two, which admittedly is late, but it didn't signify a problem in any way and she is just fine.

If there is a cause for concern it will probably be noticed first by you, not his Ped. Trust your instincts and try not to worry.
 

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My ds is 15 mos old and pretty much below the 5th percentile in everything physically and just started pointing at things. He does understand commands at times, but he's very much his own little person and does things when HE wants to! Prime example-he didn't roll over til he was 11 mos and didn't start to crawl til he was a year! His ped is freaking out about his size, but compared to other babes in his age range, he's fairly average. I say take your peds info with a grain of salt because all babes develop differently and in their own time, but keep an eye on things.
 

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DS is 19 months old and has only been following commands for a month or two. At 12 months, he was still doing the commando crawl. He wasn't pulling up to stand or cruising and he couldn't stand without support. The only sign he did was milk and his only word was dada, though he had said byebye and mama once or twice. He's now walking, running, using about 8 signs, talks up a storm, and can follow simple commands like "Give that to Daddy" or "Come to Mommy." After 13 months, he just had a surge of doing stuff all at once. He was "late" on almost all of his motor skill milestones, so I wasn't worried. That's just DS's style. He's laid back. I don't think your DS sounds delayed at all. You know your little one better than anybody. If you think he's ok, he's probably ok.
 

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lets see here...i got out Emma's baby book so i can tell you when she started doing some of the simple things that you asked about

clapping hands-9 months
waved bye bye- 10 months

she started being able to follow basic commands (Where's baby pooh) at around 9 or 10 months also

BUT

she didn't start crawling until she was 11 months old and she just recently started walking and she is 16 months old now, so Emma was always on track with the fine motor skills (waving, clapping, pointing) and at the later end of the gross motor skills (standing, crawling, walking)

Emma dosn't talk much either, she says mama, dada, dinkie (binkie), and up and those all started within the last month or so....

if anything i would have your sons hearing tested, it seems like he may not be fully understanding what your saying, which is why he can't follow commands.....
 

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I'm truly amazed - maybe it's just an American thing
but I can't believe anybody, let alone a 'medical professional' would be crazy enough to think there's something wrong with your child! I have a 1 year old myself but used to work in a daycare centre so have seen a lot of kids at that age - THEY'RE ALL DIFFERENT! And they're all just fine. The 'normal' age range for walking/talking/waving/telling peds to mind their own business is HUGE, even greater than you'll find in any books IMO. I also agree with what somebody said already - that they tend to focus on one set of skills at a time, and leave some things behind while they work on others. Can't we just leave them alone to get on with it and trust ourselves to know when something is genuinely wrong?

OK, rant over, here's what mine's doing;

walking (as of last week), dancing, laughing, pointing (for about 2 weeks now), saying mama, dada, 'chicken' (or something very similar - don't ask!
), recognising about 10 words (indicates object by pointing), responding to a couple of basic commands/gestures, and generally beoing a 'typical' 1 year old!
 

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DS didn't talk at all at 1 year (still doesn't very much at 22 mos), and didn't follow instructions until about 14-16 mos (?).
He started walking at 9 mos (never really crawled), but didn't point at 1 year.

My ped never said a word about it - he said DS was perfect. It sounds like your doc is over-reacting a bit. If you're concerned, though, it wouldn't hurt to have his hearing checked.
 

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Yours sounds a lot like mine. She doesn't wave bye-bye, but I only recently realized I was apparentely supposed to teach it to her, lol. (We don't really leave her and we're not that social, so there's not a lot of goodbyes in my house). Mine doesn't really clap, though sometimes if she's really excited she sort of, kind of does. Sometimes. Sort of.

Mine has about the same words, she's been saying them for months though.

She commando-crawls, doesn't quite cruise yet (I think that's happening soon).

So if you have a problem, I have a problem too. And I don't think I have a problem.
 

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Your son is giving kisses at just one year?!! And barking when he sees a dog? How wonderful!

I'll start by saying that I was recently reading a story about a hearing child of deaf parents. Her first language was sign. It was the only language spoken in home from the time of her first breath. She is developmentally typical, and she did not sign for the first time until she was 11 months.

Also, I have a nephew who was silent until he was about two. Didn't say a single word and didn't do a ton of vocal play. My sister (not his mom, but my other sister), told me that she thought he might be language delayed. Sometime after his second birthday, he said his first word. In that same day, according to my sister (his mom), he said seven more. According to my above mentioned sister who is not his mom, when he said his first word, he said it in a sentence. LOL

I will tell you what my son did at one year. However, he is just slightly behind the mean in all areas of development except social (for which he is above the mean). Also, at 5 or 6 months he first qualified for early intervention because he never went through a cooing stage. At that age, on standardized tests (in which they test him exactly the same way as all babies are tested and then score him in relationship to what kids his same age could do), he deviated significantly from the norm in both receptive and expressive language. The degree to which he is delayed in this area may have lessened since that evaluation. His birth parents are both cognitively disabled, so fortunatley we were quick to get him in early intervention. Turns out he also has mild-moderate hearing loss (finally recently diagnosed with a sedated hearing test), so that may explain some or all of his language development issues...only time will tell, and I can only hope. By the way, your kido babbling a wide variety of sounds and going up and down with his voice as if conversing is a really, really good sign. Keep in mind also that my kid is a very physical kid. He focuses first on physical milestones. Even in developmentally typical kids, some kids are just like that.

So, at one year, he was crawling, pulling to stand, climbing (he was big on climbing and had no interest in walking), and cruising around furniture only as far as it took to get to a good climbing location, saying "a-dah!" for done (I think, or maybe that came shortly after he turned a year, and maybe saying "da" for dog (I can't remember). Those are still his only two spoken words, though he can sign a few more words now at 15 months. He also was just, just starting to get really mild separation anxiety some of the time (it is full force now).

What types of things was he *not* doing? Let's see...pointing, waving (this came a little after his first birthday, if memory serves), signing (he signed his first signed word at 13 or 13.5 months), saying "mama" (he still doesn't say "mama" at 15 months), walking (he started this around 14 months), responding to simple one-step commands/requests (he is just starting to do this, and sometimes its hard to tell), kissing, "feeding" his stuffed animals and dolly (he does this now at 15 months, and started at 13 or 14 months, which I hear may be on the early side), clapping (this came in at 13 or 14 months), and "dancing." He also wouldn't grab for either my nose, mouth, or eyes when I named them, even though we had been "working on" this for a couple months. He learned that maybe around 13 months, but somehow "lost" this skill and still doesn't do it at 15 months.

If you are concerned, there is no harm in getting an early intervention evaluation. It might provide you with reassurance (honestly, your child sounds like he's doing well), and tell you about your child's strengths, or it might help you sort out a delay and get some services to help your child. If you are in the U.S., early intervention evals are free, and if your child is significantly delayed in any single area (language, or whatever), services are provided for free. Contact your local school district and ask them who you should call for the "birth to three" early intervention program. They should be able to point you in the right direction. There may be a delay because it is the summer, but once you request an eval, they have a limited time period in which they must provide it.

Keep in mind that doctors are trained in medicine and have only limited training in child development. Most of the time this means they are far too slow to intervene, but sometimes it means they get concerned over nothing. An evaluation could clear it all up.

Perhaps your doc can also refer you to an Ear, Nose, and Throat doc and an audiologist for testing. My ds "passed" a voluntary hearing test (where they put him a sound booth and tried to get his attention with noises), but we kept looking into it because I felt he wasn't hearing that well. I dreaded the sedated hearing test, but it turned out to be no big deal, and gave us a lot of information about his hearing.
 

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My son is 15 months, and he only says about 4 words. At 12 months, he said maybe 1 word. He clapped and pointed around 10 months. I think technically he's "behind" on his speech milestones, but he does have about 10 signs, and he follows verbal requests, and he will make animal sounds if you ask him what a cow or seal says. I think he's been concentrating on learning to walk. He's mastered walking now, and he does seem to be working on his verbal skills more. I'm not at all concerned. I can tell that his hearing is fine because he will sign "train" when he hears trains outside, and if he hears the garbage truck, he says "truck" and points and comes to me to be picked up to see out the window. Trust your intuition. It sounds like you think he understands some language, but you're not sure. Maybe start with a hearing test. Imo, early intervention can't do any harm. But as everyone else has said, kids develop at their own rate, and what's normal for one child is radically different from what's normal for another. Good luck!
 

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I would really not worry too much at this stage, he sounds fine, but as the PP says getting hi checked will not hurt and will either help or set your mind at rest so its a win-win situation.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Sierra
Also, I have a nephew who was silent until he was about two. Didn't say a single word and didn't do a ton of vocal play. My sister (not his mom, but my other sister), told me that she thought he might be language delayed. Sometime after his second birthday, he said his first word. In that same day, according to my sister (his mom), he said seven more. According to my above mentioned sister who is not his mom, when he said his first word, he said it in a sentence. LOL
My mom has a friend with four chilren. Her first three were girls, and her last was her only boy. He took a long time to start talking, and she was worrying a little, but reminding herself that "boys aren't usually as verbal" as girls, and maybe her expectations were too high because of having only girls before.

He never did say single words. He started out talking in sentences. I think he was waiting until he could "get it right".
 
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