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Okay so I met with the OT and answered about a million questions. She said that it appears she has an Auditory Sensory problem and Motor Sensory Seeking. Thats why she is always making noise and jumping everywhere. She is also testing on her motor and visual at 18-26mths. She is almost 4 so she is quite a bit behind. But they think that this will catch up as they work with teh sensory stuff.<br>
So what kind of things can I start with her now to help this? She wont have her first Session until later next week. I would like to start working with her now.<br>
Also, did anyone else feel horrible mother when they found this out about their child. I would get so angry and frustrated with her constant moving and having to tell her 10 million times over to stop jumping on the couch/jumping on the bed/diving off the bed etc. I felt like she must hate me because she just woudln't listen!<br>
Now I feel horrbly guilty that I was so frustrated when it was all stuff she just couldn't help.<br>
Also, now that I know, I try not to be so hard on her...but i get stares in teh store. People seem to look at me like I guess I looked at them before (crazy huh, didnt' realize how judgemental I was until now....I suck) like I should be diciplining her!<br>
Sigh....<br>
Anyway,s thanks for any responses!
 

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You can start at home by doing deliberate sensory input type stuff. All the spinning, crashing and flailing around she's doing is her way of seeking that input. So help her! Get a crawl tunnel and do lots of crawling. Make an obstacle course - jump over a few things (you may have to help with this if she's behind on gross motor, my son can't jump yet), crawl through and around things, swing her in the air, run up the stairs, roll across the floor, etc. You'll find that even with OT sessions she's still going to crave sensory input during the day, so it's good to set some rough times when you deliberately engage in sensory play. We aim for 20-30 mins after breakfast and another session mid-afternoon. We do quiet, deliberate play before nap and bedtime. For us, that's lots of sandwich hugs, hiding in the laundry basket, reading books in my lap while I'm holding him very tightly, etc.<br><br>
Really spend some time reading the activities on the spd websites in your earlier threads - they have lots of good stuff!
 
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