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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wow, I came back to edit this with an update, and realized there were several replies that I hadn't even read---I guess my subscription to this thread got turned off. Thanks, everybody.<br><br>
Well, we saw the allergist yesterday and it is confirmed. DS is allergic to peanuts and tree nuts. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bawling.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bawl"> I really want to thank those of you here who encouraged me to have him tested. Otherwise, I don't know that I would have done it.<br><br>
I have to admit I'm a bit in denial. I'm quite sure that since the peanut butter cookie incident a couple of months ago (I mean between then and yesterday, when he was tested and diagnosed with PA), he has had some exposures to small amounts of peanut with no reaction. True confessions: I didn't eliminate peanut products from the house as I was advised here, and 3yo DS continued to have his banana with PB every morning until yesterday, and I generally use the same washcloth to wipe both of their hands/faces after meals (although DS1 is getting better at NOT getting his hands and face messy, I'm sure there have been trace amounts of PB on the cloth). Also, today our housemates got Chinese takeout for dinner for all of us, and DS ate it without incident...but I now realize that could have been "contaminated." Not to mention a couple weeks ago, pre-diagnosis, when I unthinkingly gave both of them Cheerios snack mix in the grocery store to buy myself a few more minutes of shopping time, then later realized that it was "Honey Nut" Cheerio snack mix, and the allergy info on the label said it contains peanuts. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/duh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="duh"> Still, no reaction.<br><br>
Of course, now that we have an official diagnosis I will take all the precautions---DS1 is now being sworn off peanut butter...but there's a part of me that just wonders if it's really real.<br><br>
Anyway, I just thought I should give y'all an update, and welcome you to yell at me and shake me out of my denial.<br><br>
(The following is my original post from a couple of months ago)<br><br>
I'm such a dork. Last night I made some peanut butter cookies, and this morning I gave one to my 16-month-old without even thinking. He didn't have any kind of severe reaction, but he did develop red patches on his skin wherever it had contacted the mixture of cookie and drool (around his mouth and on the hand that he used to feed himself. And, some tiny white welts appeared in the red patches. However, all of this disappeared within about ten minutes and he seems totally fine.<br><br>
Do you think he's allergic to peanuts? Could it just be a mild allergy or a sensitivity? Is it likely to get worse and become the nightmarish sort of peanut allergy that so many kids unfortunately experience?<br><br>
Oh yeah. This has also happened with ketchup. He doesn't seem to react to tomatoes alone, but for some reason he seemed to react to ketchup. ???
 

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That's how my daughters reaction was. We got her tested by an allergist (RAST and skin test) and she was positive. We didn't chance her being around peanuts because the reactions can become so severe. Anyway, my daughter outgrew her peanut allergy at age 3 and now can eat peanuts and peanut butter with out a problem.<br><br>
About the ketchup, could he be allergic to corn syrup or some other additive?<br><br>
I'd get him tested by a reputable allergist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>elmh23</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11527133"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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About the ketchup, could he be allergic to corn syrup or some other additive?</div>
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Yeah...the corn syrup crossed my mind, and now I'm trying to think if he's had other things with corn syrup. I'm sure he has...we don't do a lot of sweets or junk/processed food, but I'm also not militant about it so I'm sure he's been exposed. I'll have to keep an eye on that.<br><br>
So if he was reacting to corn syrup, would that indicate an allergy to corn itself, or just corn syrup for some reason? (probably a dumb question but I don't know how they make corn syrup...)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>chilliepepper</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11525742"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm such a dork. Last night I made some peanut butter cookies, and this morning I gave one to my 16-month-old without even thinking. He didn't have any kind of severe reaction, but he did develop red patches on his skin wherever it had contacted the mixture of cookie and drool (around his mouth and on the hand that he used to feed himself. And, some tiny white welts appeared in the red patches. However, all of this disappeared within about ten minutes and he seems totally fine.<br><br>
Do you think he's allergic to peanuts? Could it just be a mild allergy or a sensitivity? Is it likely to get worse and become the nightmarish sort of peanut allergy that so many kids unfortunately experience?<br></div>
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See an allergist ASAP. Possible peanut allergy is not something to ignore. Yes, reactions can get worse over time. Be prepared.<br><br>
Good luck.
 

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My DS just had a skin test for a peanut allergy. It caused a large red mark with a white center that looked like when you first get a a mequito bite so to me what you described sounds like a peanut allergy. On the other hand, it seems lots of toddlers get that redness around the mouth with ketchup. I know mine did but now they don't.
 

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It's not the first exposure to something like peanut that the immune system reacts to, it's the subsequent exposures.<br><br>
Just like the first bee sting will not tell you you are allergic, only the second will tell you if the immune system has decided to react to it strongly and starts marshalling the mast cells.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So I guess the reaction could be on of two things:<br><br>
1. This was really his second (or subsequent? it can show up later than the second exposure, right?) exposure, the first exposure being indirect (some other food he's had might have had peanuts and I just didn't realize) or via my milk (I've freely eaten peanut butter, etc. while pg. and nursing him).<br><br>
2. It was his first exposure, and the reaction was a coincidence and was really to something else.<br><br>
In the second case, we won't know if he's allergic until the NEXT time he's exposed to peanuts.<br><br>
Right?
 

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Yes, but I personally wouldn't allow him a next time. I'd go to an allergist and have your lo tested for peanut and then, go from there.<br><br>
My friend's dd has eaten sushi her entire life. She loves crab and fish. She's now 11 and just had an allergic reaction. She got hives and couldn't breathe. This is after years of exposure (though, she's had mild, intermittent eczema and several environmental allergies).<br><br>
With some of these allergens, there's just no telling how severe the next reaction will be. If you weren't dealing with peanut, one of the most severe and life long allergies, I wouldn't be as concerned.
 

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Unless you have fed him only whole, unprocessed foods, you may have given him something in the past that is processed with peanuts, and although that would be small amounts, he may have had some small exposures before now. Is that possible? Personally, I would just totally avoid peanuts and not even bring them in the house for now.<br><br>
The reaction you describe is how I first suspected my LO was truly allergic to peanuts. (I had suspected he was sensitive, but this made me know it was a serious thing.) He ate only 2 or 3 tiny raisins out of a bag of trail mix that my older child was eating (that had peanuts in it), and he developed that type of rash around his mouth.<br><br>
I would not even have it in the house if I were you. We were not giving my LO peanuts at all because of these early signs of the allergy, but I did have it in the house, and he was accidentally given some actual peanut butter by another family member, and he had a significant reaction. SO, my advice would be just don't even have it around. It's too easy to "forget" and give him a bite of what you are eating, or have another family member who is not as vigilant as you might be accidentally give him some.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh wow, this is going to be hard...DS1 (not the DS I was posting about originally) loves, loves, LOVES peanut butter. He has a banana with peanut butter every morning for breakfast. Yeah, he started getting PB at age 1 due to my cluelessness, along with the AAP Guide to Infant Care which included (at that time at least, please tell me they've updated it) a 1/2 peanut butter sandwich on their sample lunch menu for a 1-year old. HellOOOOOOOOOOO! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: After I got a little wiser to allergy issues, I wondered if I should cut out PB, but this was after he'd been eating it for a long time and the ped said if he's been eating it that long with no reaction, then it's probably fine.<br><br>
(Do you disagree? Do you think he's at significant risk even now? He turns 3 today <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">)<br><br>
The funny thing is that because of this, I'm sure DS2 HAS had a lot of "small" exposures, for example I use the same washcloth to clean both their hands and faces after they eat. Also, I know he was exposed a few months ago when I had Pad Thai at a Thai restaurant (usually includes peanuts, not to mention shellfish <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/duh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="duh">) and gave him some without thinking. He had the same mild reaction.<br><br>
So I guess I shouldn't wait till his next well visit (Aug 27) to get a referral for an allergist, eh?
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>chilliepepper</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11593702"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Oh wow, this is going to be hard...DS1 (not the DS I was posting about originally) loves, loves, LOVES peanut butter. He has a banana with peanut butter every morning for breakfast. Yeah, he started getting PB at age 1 due to my cluelessness, along with the AAP Guide to Infant Care which included (at that time at least, please tell me they've updated it) a 1/2 peanut butter sandwich on their sample lunch menu for a 1-year old. HellOOOOOOOOOOO! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: After I got a little wiser to allergy issues, I wondered if I should cut out PB, but this was after he'd been eating it for a long time and the ped said if he's been eating it that long with no reaction, then it's probably fine.<br><br>
(Do you disagree? Do you think he's at significant risk even now? He turns 3 today <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">)<br><br>
The funny thing is that because of this, I'm sure DS2 HAS had a lot of "small" exposures, for example I use the same washcloth to clean both their hands and faces after they eat. Also, I know he was exposed a few months ago when I had Pad Thai at a Thai restaurant (usually includes peanuts, not to mention shellfish <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/duh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="duh">) and gave him some without thinking. He had the same mild reaction.<br><br>
So I guess I shouldn't wait till his next well visit (Aug 27) to get a referral for an allergist, eh?</div>
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Eliminate the PB from your home to keep DS2 safe. There are alternatives to peanut butter that are safe. Try Sunbutter (sunflower seed) or SoyNut butter.<br>
For us, one family member's love of peanut butter isn't worth the risk. Even a three year old can understand that changes need to be made to keep a sibling safe. BTDT, it's a lesson in compassion for sure.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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Sunflower Seed Butter is very yummy and tastes just like PB until the aftertaste (which is like sunflower seed aftertaste.) It fooled me when I was pregnant at least!<br><br>
Get the PB out of your house. If it turns out he's not allergic (though it really sounds like he is!) great, bring it back. Until then, you don't want to risk anything. Explaine to your 3yo (Happy Birthday) that you think the PB is makin brother sick. My 3yo just outgrew an allergy and 2 days later her 1yo brother was diagnosed with one. Dd HAS to eat peanuts once a week to keep the allergy at bay, but our house is still peanut free. She loves peanut butter so when we're at the store and she's begging me for some, I just tell her that little brother is allergic to it and it can make him really sick. She lays off and then goes and begs Nana for some <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Good luck mama!
 

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I love sunbutter now that I can't have PB. What you are describing is how I first suspected DS had a PA. With the first two reactions, we didn't connect the PB with the reaction, partially b/c the second reaction was really strange (one eye swelled up after he held, but did not eat, my PB&J). After a third reaction I finally clued in and called an allergist. Now if I could only get my mother to take his PA seriously.
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>elmh23</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11594812"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My 3yo just outgrew an allergy and 2 days later her 1yo brother was diagnosed with one. Dd HAS to eat peanuts once a week to keep the allergy at bay, but our house is still peanut free.</div>
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Is this getting a negative (or very low) IgE test or SPT? Then doing an in office challenge? How were you guided thru this?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>chilliepepper</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11593702"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">(Do you disagree? Do you think he's at significant risk even now? He turns 3 today <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">)<br><br>
The funny thing is that because of this, I'm sure DS2 HAS had a lot of "small" exposures, for example I use the same washcloth to clean both their hands and faces after they eat. Also, I know he was exposed a few months ago when I had Pad Thai at a Thai restaurant (usually includes peanuts, not to mention shellfish <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/duh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="duh">) and gave him some without thinking. He had the same mild reaction.<br><br>
So I guess I shouldn't wait till his next well visit (Aug 27) to get a referral for an allergist, eh?</div>
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No, I don't think your 3 yo is at risk.<br><br>
However, like the story above to the 11 yo and shellfish... officially anyone at any time can become anaphylactic even if they have not reacted in the past. There are many instances of people becoming so as they are older. I wish this was studied more, or if it is I haven't seen it. I would guess that this would be the result of a significant immune challenge, such as lots of antibiotics or an illness?<br><br>
Yes, those small exposures are plenty for the immune system to start marshalling its mast cells.<br><br>
I would go to an allergist as soon as possible just to be sure. I would ask your Ped about EpiPen Jr. now just in case.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>swampwitch</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11634182"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Now if I could only get my mother to take his PA seriously.</div>
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I have had to deal with a DH who has fought with me on this too, it's not fun to say it nicely.<br><br>
I'd start sending her real stories of deaths<br><a href="http://heraldnet.com/article/20080704/NEWS01/546172117/0/SPORTS" target="_blank">http://heraldnet.com/article/2008070...72117/0/SPORTS</a><br><br>
or having her read this book, it's very good<br><a href="https://www.foodallergy.org/shoppingcart/cgi-bin/msascartlist.dll/ProductInfo?productcd=PSFHP" target="_blank">https://www.foodallergy.org/shopping...roductcd=PSFHP</a>
 

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I also wanted to suggest buying sunbutter (or Trader Joe's sunflower seed butter, which is cheaper.) When I found out about my DD's peanut allergy I switched DS, who was almost 4 at the time, over to sunbutter and he didn't even have a clue!<br><br>
Also, a lot of ketchups, like Heinz, contain garlic. It could be a spice like that causing the reaction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm just bumping this up with the update that I just wrote...I'm not sure if that is the right way to update a thread...sorry if I broke protocol!<br><br>
And while I'm at it, are sunflower seeds considered a nut, i.e. one of the "tree nuts" that have to be avoided by the tree-nut-allergic?
 

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Sunflower seeds are not considered a nut, though people can be allergic to seeds (like my dd). They're a really good alternative to pb. I bet your 3 yr old won't even notice. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Was sesame tested? I'm curious for my own info. Sesame has been the only anaphylactic reaction DS has had. He tests allergic to PN and TN. I just wonder how prevalent sesame is since it is gradually becoming known to be as powerful as nut allergy.
 
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