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We have a 1990 edition of the book A Child is Born (Lennart Nilsson), which features gorgeous embryo/fetus photos as well as photos of mothers in labor, giving birth, and breastfeeding. The photos of adults are rather dated, but hey, pregnancy and birth in general are timeless, right?<br><br>
My 4 y/o loves looking at the pictures with me and talking about pregnancy, fetal development, and birth. My problem with the book is the tone it takes once we get to the birthing part. I don't think any of the photos show homebirth. The assumption seems to be that all mothers go to the hospital - there are pictures of a mother packing an overnight bag, lots of pictures of people in hospital gowns, in bright light, surrounded by instruments. The general message when reading that part of the book is that use of technology and a hospital environment are normal and desirable during pregnancy and birth. I find myself telling my son that "some mommies stay home and some mommies decide to have their babies in the hospital"...but I'd like photos to back me up on that!<br><br>
There is also a c/section photo, photos of women breathing nitrous or using TENS, and some of babies in a NICU. I'm ok with talking about them but again, since photos of medical interventions outnumber photos of normal birth, I feel like my message is overruled by the medical tone of that part of the book. I want to acknowledge to him that *sometimes* mommies and babies need medical help, but I want the default message to be that *most of the time* they don't. Sure, he's getting that message from me, but I don't want him to see a conflicting message everywhere else he looks. I need some support!<br><br>
I would just use the book for talking about development in utero, but my son wants to read the WHOLE book, and there's no persuading him that it ends before all the medical birth stuff.<br><br>
On the up side, there are TONS of breastfeeding photos. Lots o' very normal boobs in that book. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
Does anybody have a recommendation for a great book with lots and lots of color photographs of mothers laboring and giving birth in non-medical environments?
 
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