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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/6425977.stm

"The use of drugs to treat hyperactivity in children has soared worldwide, say US researchers.

Between 1993 and 2003, prescriptions of ADHD medications, such as Ritalin, almost tripled.

Global spending on ADHD drugs increased nine-fold, with 83% occurring in the US, a study in Health Affairs reported. "

I'm not surprised, but this makes me so angry when I think of all of those kids on meds.
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"He added that that one in 25 children and adolescents in the US is taking drugs for ADHD but the findings challenge the assumption that the disorder is a US phenomenon."

OMG! 1 in 25! 1 in 25! That is so amazingly frightening. When they list the symptoms of ADHD, they say "inattention, hyperactivity and impulsiveness." Sounds like a normal kid to me... .especially a preschool or elementary school kid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
An article on overdiagnosis

US Congress Told of Overdiagnosis of ADHD in Schools

"Currently over 5 million children are diagnosed with the disorder. Some have attributed the rise to the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which steers money to school districts so that they can treat disabled children, since it can give schools an incentive to label children with ADHD."

"Others said...They said that overcrowded classrooms and a paucity of training among teachers in dealing with behavior problems force the teachers to push for the calming effect of Ritalin and other drugs for hyperactive students."

 

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Our education system and our value system both need major overhauls, I believe. Those numbers are insanely high and just plain scary.

I think, also, how people perceive children is a big part of this.
 

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Quote:
"You need to find a balance with does the medication make the child's life easier or are you prescribing it to make life easier for the adults around them."
I don't mind being the voice of dissent here. There are children who do have legitimate attention issues. While some attention issues are age appropriate, imagine what it's like to have that problem souped up. I think the above quote is fair. You don't give meds to kids to make the lives of the adults around them easier, you give kids meds if the risks of the meds are less than the risks of no meds.

For example, on another board, a mother posted that she was originally resistant to the idea of meds, but when she saw her twin daughters, for the first time ever, remember on their own to look both ways before crossing the street, she became comfortable with her decision. These attention issues are a big deal, not the fantasy of having a six year old boy "sit still" in class.

4% doesn't sound like all that high a number to me. For reference, isn't that about the same as the number of mothers who are truly unable to breastfeed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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Originally Posted by Finch View Post
IDEA laws have been lifesavers for many parents. That's all I'm gonna say about that.
I don't think IDEA laws are bad... of course they're helpful for parents who have kids who need them. BUT, it's horrifying that schools are putting some kids on unnecessary meds to gain funding.

And yes... there are kids who may benefit from the drugs, but the US definitely has issues with overprescribing them.

For example, even the AAP says that it cannot be diagnosed in kids under 5... and that the behavior should occur in more than one setting. YET, how many preschoolers are on the meds? How many schools make the diagnosis even if the behavior is not exhibited elsewhere?

At least since July 2004, schools cannot force kids to be on ritalin and other meds as a condition for attending school.
 

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Originally Posted by umsami View Post
I BUT, it's horrifying that schools are putting some kids on unnecessary meds to gain funding...At least since July 2004, schools cannot force kids to be on ritalin and other meds as a condition for attending school.
Schools don't put kids on meds to gain funding. Schools give kids a "label" to gain funding. The "label" allows them to create an educational plan that address the unique issues of any given child.

There are definitely areas where ritalin is overused, but there are also areas where it's under used.
 
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