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My son tested gifted this past January, and he will be switching schools in the fall to one that has a magnet program for GT kids. He will be going into first grade. Mind you, he is young -- just now 5.5. I had him tested into K because he was past the cutoff age of Oct 1 (he is Halloween), but was bored out of his mind in pre-K.<br><br>
My issue is that he is not reading yet. I was reading when I was 2-3, so having a 5.5 year old that doesn't read is baffling to me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I don't outwardly show this, it's just something in my mind. He is supposedly above average on his reading according to his K teacher, but I just don't see it. He can read simple books, but I mean SIMPLE... "The fat cat sat on a mat" kind of stuff.<br><br>
Where he excels is math. He is adding numbers like 80+25+6 in his head within seconds, can do money math, is doing simple multiplication, etc... and in his class they are doing things like "Count how many cents are in the piggy bank" with a picture of a piggy bank with 7 pennies in it -- not mixed change like he does at home. He's bored, and quite understandably so!<br><br>
My concern is that I am wondering if the gifted program in his new school will take into account the disparity between his reading and mathematical skill levels, and "catch him up", so to speak. Or should I try to work with him quite a bit over the summer (and if so, any recommendations??)
 

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take a look at <a href="http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/gifted_101.htm" target="_blank">Hoagies</a> and read up on asynchronous development. Many gifted children experience this--they'll be so far ahead in one area and seemingly behind in another (sometimes they truly are, sometimes it is exagerated by their gifts). I would talk to his teacher about his asynchronous development. If it is a good gifted school, and not a school focussed on high achievement but truly on gifted learning, they should be used to this, aware of this, and it should be no problem at all.<br><br>
That is one of the reasons for gifted education, because a lot of g kids just learn in a radically different way. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>carmel23</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11138826"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Many gifted children experience this--they'll be so far ahead in one area and seemingly behind in another (sometimes they truly are, sometimes it is exagerated by their gifts).</div>
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I couldn't agree with this more. This is my daughter exactly. She was assessed to be reading on a 5th grade level and doing math at a 4th grade level, but can barely write her name legibly. (who am I kidding, it's not legible if you don't know what you are looking for). Her motor skill related activities are lagging WAY behind in comparison.
 

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It's late, but quick thoughts...<br><br>
Has he been tested in any way? (Did they do a quick-screen for the gifted program, or something more in-depth?) I wonder if that would give you more insight into different strengths in reading-type skills.<br><br>
Is he the kind of kid that learns things overnight after absorbing? We had a similar experience with DS learning to read at an age later than both DH and I did, but turns out he was on his own schedule and one day he just read. Have you ever seen your son do this? Maybe he is just waiting for that magical day, too.<br><br>
Reading The Fat Cat Sat on a Mat means he's like 5 steps into reading. It's not nothing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Ask if they do differentiation by subject at the new school. That way, he would get math and reading instruction each at his level.<br><br>
I think they probably wouldn't try to catch him up to anything in particular if he is above grade level? Boy, that was an ill-formed sentence I just made <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> but that really is farther along than expected in kindy. I understand the concern, really, but I think educators would tend to see this within normal range. Probably all the more reason to get testing for some details.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>carmel23</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11138826"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">take a look at <a href="http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/gifted_101.htm" target="_blank">Hoagies</a> and read up on asynchronous development. Many gifted children experience this--they'll be so far ahead in one area and seemingly behind in another (sometimes they truly are, sometimes it is exagerated by their gifts). I would talk to his teacher about his asynchronous development. If it is a good gifted school, and not a school focussed on high achievement but truly on gifted learning, they should be used to this, aware of this, and it should be no problem at all.</div>
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I have never met the teacher at the new school. Apparently it is a combined 1st and 2nd grade class. I think he'll like that, as he tends to like older kids anyway. I will have to email her and ask her a few things. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Icequeen_in_ak</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11138854"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I couldn't agree with this more. This is my daughter exactly. She was assessed to be reading on a 5th grade level and doing math at a 4th grade level, but can barely write her name legibly. (who am I kidding, it's not legible if you don't know what you are looking for). Her motor skill related activities are lagging WAY behind in comparison.</div>
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I've looked at my son's writing in comparison to the other kids in his class, and it is awful as well. I have a 10 yr old stepson (my son's half brother) who doesn't write well either, so maybe it is hereditary on his dad's side <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> I think my son may write a tad better than the 10 yr old, though, from what my hubby says.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>supervee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11138869"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Has he been tested in any way? (Did they do a quick-screen for the gifted program, or something more in-depth?) I wonder if that would give you more insight into different strengths in reading-type skills.</div>
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They did two CogAT where he tested above 90th percentile, but I don't remember the exact numbers, or which CogAT "varieties" at the moment. They also did the Raven's Progressive Matrices, where he tested at 99th percentile. I guess that is what they do in Kindy in his school district.<br><br>
Thanks for all your insight so far... I will have to do a little more research. Thinking back, I think I was asynchronous in the opposite direction -- reading at a college level, yet not so proficient in mathematics.
 

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My DD too! She has a very high IQ and will be in the GT program at her school next year, but she is having an awful time learning to read as well. She is 6.5, in kindergarten, and struggles with sight words and has an awful time trying to sound things out. She also has terrible handwriting and receives OT. I was sooo worried about this when she was 4-5ish and all her friends were picking up reading with ease (and I, too, was a very early reader), but with constant reassurance from her teachers, I've just backed off worrying. They all say it will come in time, when she's developemntally ready. I'm sure it's the same for your son <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.
 

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I also learned to read very early and my dd did not. She was way ahead in math and, IMO, was doing just fine in reading in First Grade, but she actually tested slightly below grade-level on the DIBELS test when she started First Grade. I don't like this test because they have the kids "read" nonsense words. Consequently, kids with speech difficulties, which my dd has, underperform on this test. I also don't think phonics is the only, or even the best way to learn to read, but that's another discussion. My dd had a breakthrough sometime in the middle of First Grade and started reading really well, but she still didn't do that well on the nonsense words portion of the test. In fact, her 2nd grade teacher said to just ignore those scores. Now, at the end of second grade she tests at about the 6th-grade level on the reading fluency and comprehension part of the DIBEL and they don't test the nonsense words anymore.<br><br>
So, your child may be asynchronous as many of the PPs have suggested, but it is also possible that your son may just not have hit that point at which reading just "clicks" for some kids. You may find that in a year or two your son's reading skills do "catch up" to a gifted level more balanced with his math skills. Either way, I don't think you have a thing to worry about and there is no need to do extra work this summer. I would just read to him a lot and be encouraging, as I am sure you are already doing, and you may find he ends up gifted in reading too, and if not, it shouldn't be a problem at the GT school.
 

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It's good you are aware of the disparity in his intelligence.. I think it depends a lot on the school or program as far as the support they will give him. It's just important that you keep tabs on how school is going and how he feels about everything, and if what you have isn't working, be proactive about finding a solution!<br><br>
I am gifted in reading and verbal skills, and have been a little behind the average person my whole life in math/logic. I had problems with learning math (due to frustration and unwillingness to learn things that came to me with difficulty) and with school in general (found it incredibly boring and pointless to do homework) as a kid, and ended up dropping out of HS.. not what anyone wants for their child! My parents were not very involved in my school experience and when I was struggling (both with being ahead of the others and bored in some areas, and feeling frustrated and 'stupid' for being slow to learn math skills - besides, multiplication tables were boring, I would rather read) and I didn't get help when I needed it.
 

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fyoosh, I am somewhat familiar with the GT magnet schools in Denver (we live a ways north of there), but we had dd tested by the Gifted Development Center in Denver and I recently wrote a paper for a psychometrics course I am taking on the validity and reliability of the CogAT for English Language learners and DPS' use of it in identifying kids for their gifted programs.<br><br>
My understanding, in speaking with the highly gifted program at DPS (the one that does testing for Polaris and other similar schools), is that they use only the verbal and quantitative portions of the CogAT dropping the nonverbal part and then use the RAVEN for the nonverbal aspect of their assessment. They also won't take tests administered by anyone outside of their program including IQ tests, which is odd IMHO. They also have different admission standards for kids of different ethnicities, SES, and English proficiency levels.<br><br>
That all aside, asynchronisity is very, very common among gifted kids, so I believe that the GT school should be able to accomodate that. I'd give a call to the school and see if you can talk with one of the 1st grade teachers or the principal to see what they think.
 

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Hi, Christa <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I remember writing with you briefly about a year and a half ago about cutoff dates for K in the Denver area. We actually do NOT live in the DPS district, we live in APS (Aurora), but he is in DPS because APS will not take kids past the cutoff no matter what. Not only for kindy, but also first grade. So I am happy he is in school at ALL at this point. Polaris is too far north for me to travel, as we live, and I work, in the SE Denver area, so he will be attending Southmoor.<br><br>
I honestly think he may have "gotten in" to Southmoor because of his ethnicity. I am caucasian (and he looks just like me), but his dad is half Puerto Rican, so his demographic is officially "White of Hispanic Origin", even though none of us speak a lick of Spanish (other than basic taught in schools). <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> We got the letter from the district saying he scored high enough to be in the GT "system", but there was no room at Southmoor. He'd be placed in a lottery system, and since we're out of district with no siblings in that district, we're low man on the totem pole. TWO DAYS later, the GT Dept called me and said he could attend Southmoor. I find that kind of odd, but hey, if his ethnicity worked for him, okay! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"> (Southmoor is something like 78% caucasian).<br><br>
Anyway, I sent email to the 1st/2nd grade HGT teacher this evening, and will be awaiting her response. I almost wish I could afford to homeschool (we NEED two incomes), but I will do the "least worst" option in lieu of it.
 

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You're post reminded me somewhat of my oldest daughter, so I thought I'd reply. She was the opposite of your son. My daughter was always very verbal, but struggled in math. She actually tested as learning disabled in math, but was gifted in other areas. I just wanted to say that her weaker skills in math have not held her back in the advanced/accelerated courses in school. In fact, she's going to graduate from high school next year and has pretty much evened out in math, catching up to her peers somewhere around middle school. In her gifted area, however, she is still far ahead. She recently got a near-perfect score on a practice AP exam. We moved around a lot when she was younger, and each school recognized that she needed to be in the GT program, even with her math scores that clearly weren't GT.<br><br>
If your school does have a problem with him being in their program because of his reading skills, definitely advocate for him until he gets in the program. Ultimately, it's your decision, not theirs. One school we moved to wouldn't accept our daughter's test results from another state because it wasn't the same test they used to evaluate giftedness. At first they refused to test her, for whatever reason, but I persisted, they tested, and shortly after that she was moved to the appropriate program.<br><br>
So I wouldn't worry about the discrepancy between his math skills vs. his reading skills. Chances are, when he figures reading out he'll just zoom right along.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>fyoosh</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11146342"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hi, Christa <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I remember writing with you briefly about a year and a half ago about cutoff dates for K in the Denver area....<br>
I honestly think he may have "gotten in" to Southmoor because of his ethnicity.</div>
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Ah, sorry that I didn't remember that, but it does sound familiar now that you mention it! I agree that I'd go for the option of a GT magnet school if it was available. We don't have anything of the sort in northern CO and the local districts are totally opposed to setting anything like that up b/c it would pull a lot of high scoring kids out of the neighborhood schools in their minds making the other schools look bad on test scores.<br><br>
In re to his ethnicity, the Denver Post ran an article a month or two back about the admission standard being the 75th percentile for minority students, so he'd still be way above that.<br><br>
5.5 is still very young for reading and, not to be stereotypical, but boys often take a little longer in the verbal areas and are good at math, like you are seeing with your son. I hope that you and he are happy with the new school next year.
 

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I never would have said that Bean was more of a math kid than a verbal one, but he didn't learn to read until last fall (not fluently, in any case). When he did, though, it happened very quickly-- one day he couldn't read, one day he could. Your son will probably do something similar, just wake up one day and know how to read, and then look at you like you were silly for not realizing that he could do it all along. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Stella_luna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11140389"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My DD too! She has a very high IQ and will be in the GT program at her school next year, but she is having an awful time learning to read as well. She is 6.5, in kindergarten, and struggles with sight words and has an awful time trying to sound things out. She also has terrible handwriting and receives OT. I was sooo worried about this when she was 4-5ish and all her friends were picking up reading with ease (and I, too, was a very early reader), but with constant reassurance from her teachers, I've just backed off worrying. They all say it will come in time, when she's developemntally ready. I'm sure it's the same for your son <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.</div>
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How far behind in reading is she? Dyslexia is often missed in girls b/c it tends to be milder, and less pronounced than in boy.<br><br>
OP, if he is ahead in reading why feel a need to push. It's OK that he just happens to be <i>more</i> ahead in math. Just let him keep working on reading at the pace he is comfortably challenged at.
 
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