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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<span><b>I am reading the "out of sync child" and I am discovering something interesting. It seems that if a child is effected with vestibular dysfunction, he/she may have a "floppy and loose" body. Nothing is wrong structurally with the muscles, but the brain is not sending out sufficient messages to give them "oomph"<br><br>
Can anyone elaborate on this?<br>
I have known for sometime now that there is sensory stuff going on. My 12 mos. DD hates baths, she is terrified in it so I bathe with her. : ) She has maintain some of the startled reflexes. It upsets her when we use the blowdryer on her (not sure if a typical kid may be upset by this as well) She doesn't like the sensation of wind in her face, and is tactile defensive with the classic "cautious" approach when touching things, therefore, exploring with her hands is hindered. We have been using the surgical brush on her palms, back of the hands. Heck, her entire body save the face! We have seen improvements, though it is on the slow side. It is worthy to note that the startling and the crying over the blowdryer seems to amplify with the suppl. of the fish oil. We started to add vitamin e to the mix 3 days ago. Waiting to see what happens with that.<br><br>
So, CAN sensory issues BRING on low muscle tone? DD has had more tests than a Harvard grad student (to quote a great mama) and no dx.<br><br>
Thanks for your feedback.</b></span><br><span style="color:#C0C0C0;"><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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I wasn't sure from your post. Has anyone observed or diagnosed her with hypotonia? If she's been seen and tested by a lot of people I'd think someone would have spotted it if was present to any large degree. Pretty much everyone who has seen our child mentions it as soon as they touch him.<br><br>
And, yes hypotonia and sensory dysfunction often go together. The near senses count on getting messages from the muscles about where they are in space and they may not be getting as much information when the child is low tone.
 

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this is kind of a chicken and egg question. it's not necessarily that one 'causes' the other, but the two very often go hand in hand because the feedback that the child's brain is getting about where their body is in space is impaired because of the hypotonia.<br><br>
it does sound like you are doing a wonderful job of addressing your daughter's needs!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<span><b>Yes, m'am. Devon has hypotonia. She is also dev. delayed and has a bit of strabismus which we are patching for currently. She was officially dx'd with hypotonia at 5 mos. though I suspected it earlier when she didn't have head control at 4 mos.<br>
When I wrote in my post that she doesn't have a dx, I meant the origin of the hypotonia.<br><br>
As much as we are doing with her (pt, ot, st and parent's turn at pt and ot) and for her (cranial sacral, fish oil/vit. E, babywearing) it seems that it's really the passage of time that is the bigger healer.<br>
Ever feel that way?</b></span><br><br><span style="color:#C0C0C0;"><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Roar</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8157833"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I wasn't sure from your post. Has anyone observed or diagnosed her with hypotonia? If she's been seen and tested by a lot of people I'd think someone would have spotted it if was present to any large degree. Pretty much everyone who has seen our child mentions it as soon as they touch him.<br><br>
And, yes hypotonia and sensory dysfunction often go together. The near senses count on getting messages from the muscles about where they are in space and they may not be getting as much information when the child is low tone.</div>
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<span><b>Thanks!<br>
We <span>all</span> do try? Don't we?</b></span><br><span style="color:#C0C0C0;"><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"><br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kidspiration</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8157912"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">it does sound like you are doing a wonderful job of addressing your daughter's needs!</div>
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I do think it is more that hypotonic kids tend toward sensory issues. In my son's case (his hypotonia is mild and getting milder with time it seems or else he is just getting stronger--primary dx. is now mild PDD-NOS/developmental delay I suspect we're dealing with more but time will tell). He has had issues with vestibular function but his issues are more proprioceptive-his body just doesn't get the message of where he is in space.<br>
It is frustrating I know not to have a reason. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> It bugs me with my son. Out of curiousity does she have any issues with reflux and/or constipation? I always thought those had to be connected in my son's case to his tone but no dr. (save the mitochondrial one I guess) has ever really given me back up on that; he had strabismus too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<span><b>Hi- Its great to hear from you.<br>
Yes, our ped told us that the constipation is quite related to the low tone.<br>
She doesn't reflux so far as I can tell.<br>
How do you tackle the strabismus?</b></span><br><span style="color:#C0C0C0;"><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sbgrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8158500"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I do think it is more that hypotonic kids tend toward sensory issues. In my son's case (his hypotonia is mild and getting milder with time it seems or else he is just getting stronger--primary dx. is now mild PDD-NOS/developmental delay I suspect we're dealing with more but time will tell). He has had issues with vestibular function but his issues are more proprioceptive-his body just doesn't get the message of where he is in space.<br>
It is frustrating I know not to have a reason. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> It bugs me with my son. Out of curiousity does she have any issues with reflux and/or constipation? I always thought those had to be connected in my son's case to his tone but no dr. (save the mitochondrial one I guess) has ever really given me back up on that; he had strabismus too.</div>
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My dd has hypotonia and I guess she's classified as a sensory seeker - she LOVES going to the fabric store to pet things, lol, and when she first started walking, she had to bend down and touch the floor to check it out whenever she changed surfaces....things like that.<br><br>
As a baby, she HATED getting bathed. As in she would scream as if I was setting her into a tub of lava HATED. Once she got control of her sitting upright, she went from HATING to LOVING the bath in the space of one bath time <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> For her it was about the lack of control over her body rather than water. She also screamed in terror when they put her on the yogo ball at therapy (I refered to it as the "yoga ball of terror", lol, but then one day, had fun on it and never had a problem since), and right now, she's unsure of the hippotherapy, however, once they gave her stirrups to put her feet in and also I bring her neoprene vest from school, those seem to help her get the input she needs to feel stable and enjoys herself once the horse gets moving.<br><br>
She also has strabismus...and pseudo-strabismus. She has epicanthal folds so sometimes she looks cross-eyed but isn't b/c of the folds (the pseudo-strabismus.) But her one eye will cross badly - the strabismus is caused by far-sightedness and I think the hypotonia plays into that a little as well. Hers is corrected by wearing glasses. I'm hoping that the glasses will completely correct the problem and we won't ever need surgery.<br><br>
Anyway, the hypotonia is from birth, I think that's usually the case, so I don't thing sensory issues can cause hypotonia. But maybe the hypotonia can cause some sensory issues?<br><br>
And no diagnosis here - we're running out of things to test for! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
<span><b>Interesting...<br>
I have been in the tub with her the last few baths and it seems to take much of the edge off. (No more schrieking) But the fear still registers in her eyes and she'd grab at me. She almost never grab at me as if to hold on to me.<br>
It makes sense, the safety feeling.<br></b></span><br><span style="color:#C0C0C0;"><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>peekyboo</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8159494"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Once she got control of her sitting upright, she went from HATING to LOVING the bath in the space of one bath time <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> For her it was about the lack of control over her body rather than water.</div>
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Hello,<br>
My youngest has low tone and he has alot of vestibular problems, he has major ear fluid problems which have led us to two sets of tubes. Has your daughter had fluid in her ears? When our son was very little he could not hold his head up and he was extemely unsteady until after his tube surgery, I know that most people would avoid tubes but he was at a 60db loss and the fluid was present from birth without any change. He rolled over at almost 4 months old and I happened to catch it on video, he didn't roll over again until he was 10 months old, 4 days after the tube surgery and a chiropractic adjustment. He went from having to sit in a bumbo seat and not being able to sit without wavering(for lack of a better word) and not being comfortable with any fast movement to rolling and sitting within one month. His tone is still very low and he still is very clumsy, falling and getting dizzy often, but we have seen alot of improvement since the fluid issue was taken care of. Although we have had recent troubles with the tubes being blocked and having to have another set put in ( the first ENT wouldn't listen about a family history of metal allergies and the first set of tubes were metal) the new set are plastic and he seems to be doing much better. The other day I actually found him trying to spin himself around (in clumsy 2yo fashion), he was giggling.... before the second set if he was in a swing or the wind blew he would cry and cover his ears.<br>
Laura
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
<span><b>Very interesting...<br>
DD has been to the ENT at NY Cornell when she was about 7 mos. b/c she was (is) congested. He didn't mentioned fluids in the ears. I want to go back to see him again b/c of the congestion so I will mention it.</b></span><br><span style="color:#C0C0C0;"><b>Thanks, Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>purplepaisleymama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8161867"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hello,<br>
My youngest has low tone and he has alot of vestibular problems, he has major ear fluid problems which have led us to two sets of tubes. Has your daughter had fluid in her ears? When our son was very little he could not hold his head up and he was extemely unsteady until after his tube surgery, I know that most people would avoid tubes but he was at a 60db loss and the fluid was present from birth without any change. He rolled over at almost 4 months old and I happened to catch it on video, he didn't roll over again until he was 10 months old, 4 days after the tube surgery and a chiropractic adjustment. He went from having to sit in a bumbo seat and not being able to sit without wavering(for lack of a better word) and not being comfortable with any fast movement to rolling and sitting within one month. His tone is still very low and he still is very clumsy, falling and getting dizzy often, but we have seen alot of improvement since the fluid issue was taken care of. Although we have had recent troubles with the tubes being blocked and having to have another set put in ( the first ENT wouldn't listen about a family history of metal allergies and the first set of tubes were metal) the new set are plastic and he seems to be doing much better. The other day I actually found him trying to spin himself around (in clumsy 2yo fashion), he was giggling.... before the second set if he was in a swing or the wind blew he would cry and cover his ears.<br>
Laura</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>newmothermary</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8158020"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><span><b><br>
As much as we are doing with her (pt, ot, st and parent's turn at pt and ot) and for her (cranial sacral, fish oil/vit. E, babywearing) it seems that it's really the passage of time that is the bigger healer.<br>
Ever feel that way?</b></span><br><br><span style="color:#C0C0C0;"><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"></div>
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Mama, I needed to hear that! Since DS has Down syndrome we also have hypotonia and sensory/vestibular stuff going on and he is very reluctant to do any kind of proto-crawling. I go from being really anxious about it to just sitting back and enjoying him, knowing that 10 years from now these inchstones will be a long ago memory... just hanging in there, doing what we can every day, right? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"><br><span><b>I know...<br>
I can't wait for the time to look back and have a good hard cry.</b></span><br><span style="color:#C0C0C0;"><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mama2graham</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8168322"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Mama, I needed to hear that! Since DS has Down syndrome we also have hypotonia and sensory/vestibular stuff going on and he is very reluctant to do any kind of proto-crawling. I go from being really anxious about it to just sitting back and enjoying him, knowing that 10 years from now these inchstones will be a long ago memory... just hanging in there, doing what we can every day, right? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"></div>
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<span><b>Yes, m'am. Devon has hypotonia. She is also dev. delayed and has a bit of strabismus which we are patching for currently. She was officially dx'd with hypotonia at 5 mos. though I suspected it earlier when she didn't have head control at 4 mos.<br>
When I wrote in my post that she doesn't have a dx, I meant the origin of the hypotonia.<br><br>
As much as we are doing with her (pt, ot, st and parent's turn at pt and ot) and for her (cranial sacral, fish oil/vit. E, babywearing) it seems that it's really the passage of time that is the bigger healer.<br>
Ever feel that way?</b></span><br><br>
Yes, that all sounds familiar. Our child has strabismus too. We ultimately didn't get a reason for the hypotonia. We did some testing, but weren't willing to do the really hard stuff (muscle biopsy, etc.) We finally decided that basically we just weren't going to get an explanation. I think there are a lot of kids that have just have mild neurological dysfunction. It sounds like you are doing the right stuff and you just need to keep plugging along. Our child is older and we've seen quite a bit of improvement with time, therapy, diet, etc.
 
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