Mothering Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My daughter is almost 7 years old.
She has been playing violen for almost 2 years now.
Its always hard to get her to practice.
My mom comes over almost every mornign to do it with her before work, for about a half hour. Sometimes she brings muffins as a treat.
Mostly, my daughter complains about practicing, though she is really proud to show off her work, and she is really excited abotu being a violeinist as an adult.
How does one make a child understand that small practices add up, and that one must work towards a larger goal?
How do you motivate your child to practice, for anythign?>

thanks for the help
brenda
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Do you model practicing or do you play along with her? That might help. Also, are the practices too long? Would 15 or 20 min be more reasonable for her?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,202 Posts
She might not be interested right now.

My oldest played piano for a number of years and then gave it up around 9.

When he was 14, he picked up another instrument and at 17, he's amazing. Nothing motivates like inner need. He's on a 3 & 1/2 week US and CN tour with the instrument. One he never played until age 14. 3 years later, he's with a college age (they have rarely taken teens) instructional program, touring.

So don't worry. If she is meant to be a violinist, she will be a violinist, even if she takes some time now to regroup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,681 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by SquirelNutkin
My daughter is almost 7 years old.
She has been playing violen for almost 2 years now.
Its always hard to get her to practice.
Does she enjoy her lessons? If so, look critically at what is different about the lessons that makes them enjoyable to the child. Often the balance of praise vs. corrections is different, or the tone of voice is different, or there is a rhythm & ritual that's part of the lesson that isn't there at home.

Does she have the opportunity to play with and observe other violin students so that she feels she is part of a community? This is the number one reason my kids have continued with violin / viola over the years. I can't imagine them having persisted without it. See if you can get her involved in group classes, or in a reading ensemble or beginning orchestra. Or pay a intermediate/advanced young teen or pre-teen five bucks a session to be a "practice buddy" and duet partner to your daughter once a week. Consider a summer violin camp or weekend workshop.

Do you create an archive of her learning? If you have a video camera, record her once a month. If you don't, use an audio recording device (even just a mic on your computer) to do the same thing. It's especially fun if you record the same piece being played with increasing levels of mastery over time, as well as newer pieces. Reviewing the old recordings will give your daughter a sense of her incremental improvements adding up to long-term progress.

Inject some fun and variety into the practice sessions. Use your computer to create a snakes & ladders style board game where each square can be filled with a practicing task or alternate activity (include some "time out" squares like "have a snack" or "pull a face"). Use an abacus or jar of marbles or chart or poker chips to keep track of repetitions and progress. Have a colouring sheet that after each practice task she colours in another section of the picture.

Consider that she may need to spend more time playing stuff that has become easy and well-mastered than on stuff that she is struggling to learn. "Play something easy that you like" is a great allocation of practice time as it boosts confidence, refines subtle skills and gives control to the child.

Hope this helps!

Miranda
(mom to four unschoolers: two violinists, a violinist-pianist and a violist)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,419 Posts
Take this for what it is worth...but my personal approach would be to get out of the middle of it. If someone has to coax or nudge you into practicing I wonder if it is really something that you are ready for. For me having the responsibility to practice is part of the necessary maturity to really being ready for lessons. I'm wondering because she started so young if you've gotten in the habit of being more responsible for this (and your mom being more responsible) than you really need to be and it is just a cycle that continues.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top