Mothering Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,212 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<a href="http://www.motherjones.com/news/update/2007/04/virginia_tech_women.html" target="_blank">http://www.motherjones.com/news/upda...ech_women.html</a><br><br><br>
"Virginia Tech President Charles Steger said authorities believed the first shooting was a "domestic dispute" and thought the gunman had fled the campus, so 'We had no reason to suspect any other incident was going to occur.' The assumption, apparently, is that men who kill their cheating girlfriends are criminals, but they are not crazy, not psychopaths, and not a danger to anyone other than the woman in question. (Or, as one reader commented at Feministe sarcastically, 'Like killing your girlfriend is no big deal.')"
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,212 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Annabel_the_Sheep</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7920032"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">'We had no reason to suspect any other incident was going to occur' does not equal to 'killing your girlfriend is no big deal.'</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Read the whole article. It doesn't say that those two statements automatically equate at VA. tech. But our <i><b>societal mindset</b></i> sometimes tends to be "it's <i><b>just</b></i> domestic violence."<br><br>
And apparently the girl he first shot was <i><b>not</b></i> his girlfriend. If he had shot two guys first (instead of a girl and the guy trying to protect her) would the initial response have been different?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,039 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>A&A</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7920141"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Read the whole article. It doesn't say that those two statements automatically equate at VA. tech. But our <i><b>societal mindset</b></i> sometimes tends to be "it's <i><b>just</b></i> domestic violence."<br><br>
And apparently the girl he first shot was <i><b>not</b></i> his girlfriend. If he had shot two guys first (instead of a girl and the guy trying to protect her) would the initial response have been different?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Most likely not, because men are shot and murdered everyday at higher rates than women. It isn't called or even concidered domestic violence. Actually if a man is murdered that is one of the last thoughts.<br><br><br><a href="http://www.ovc.gov/ncvrw/1998/html/homicide.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ovc.gov/ncvrw/1998/html/homicide.htm</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
993 Posts
That's an excellent article.<br><br>
And it is true that the murder of wives and girlfriends is not taken as seriously as the murder of other victims. It is interesting to note the historical context of this attitude: Here in the USA it was legal for a man to beat his wife until 1871.<br><br>
The article also points out the connection between men stalking women and then murdering them:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">One warning sign in such cases is a history of stalking and harassment of women. At Virginia Tech, in September 2005, poet Nikki Giovanni had Cho removed from her class at Virginia Tech after female students complained that he was using his cell phone to take pictures of their legs underneath the desks; some refused to come to class while Cho was there. In November and December of that year, two female students reported receiving threatening messages from Cho, and one said he was stalking her. But charges were never filed, and police and university officials didn't seem especially worried about the women. Yet, as Arlen Specter pointed out in comments on the VT shooting made during the Gonzalez hearings Thursday, Cho had been accused of a "crime against the state as well as against the students," and the local DA could have taken up the case.<br><br>
According to the Stalking Resource Center, one million women are stalked in the U.S. every year. In two-thirds of the cases where a female victim asks for a police protective order, that order is violated. Earlier this month, Rebecca Griego, a researcher at the University of Washington, was murdered in her office by her ex-boyfriend after she had reported his threats to the university police and Seattle police, changed her phone number, moved out of her apartment, distributed photos and descriptions of her stalker, and sought an order for protection.<br><br>
One third of female murder victims are killed by an intimate partner (as opposed to about 3 percent of male victims). Of these, 76 percent had been stalked by the partner in the year prior to their murder. Murder ranks second (after accidents) as the leading cause of death among young women. And if the Supreme Court and abortion opponents really want to protect the lives of fetuses, they might consider this: Murder is the number one cause of death of pregnant women in the United States.</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
993 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Marsupialmom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7920639"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Most likely not, because men are shot and murdered everyday at higher rates than women. It isn't called or even concidered domestic violence. Actually if a man is murdered that is one of the last thoughts.<br><br><br><a href="http://www.ovc.gov/ncvrw/1998/html/homicide.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ovc.gov/ncvrw/1998/html/homicide.htm</a></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
From your link above:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Males were most often slain by males (89 percent in single victim/single offender situations). These same data show, however, that 9 out of 10 female victims were murdered by males.</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,680 Posts
To me, the article seems to be connecting a lot of disparate points. Murders are usually committed against intimates and aquaintences, not strangers. Murders are usually isolated events. Murders do not usually turn into mass killings. It is simply not unreasonable for officials to come upon a murder scene and believe that (a) the victim probably knew the killer, and (b) the killer is most likely not in the process of finding another group of people to kill. What this has to do with national attitudes, for better or worse, towards the seriousness of violence against women is beyond me. The facts and figures to that effect are a legitimate and serious issue warranting a lot more scrutiny than they receive. But using VT as a case-in-point for doing so just doesn't make any sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
"According to the Stalking Resource Center, one million women are stalked in the U.S. every year. In two-thirds of the cases where a female victim asks for a police protective order, that order is violated. Earlier this month, Rebecca Griego, a researcher at the University of Washington, was murdered in her office by her ex-boyfriend after she had reported his threats to the university police and Seattle police, changed her phone number, moved out of her apartment, distributed photos and descriptions of her stalker, and sought an order for protection."<br><br>
And when at least one paper reported this, they included sidebars with information on suicide prevention (her murdered killed himself after killing her) but nothing about domestic violence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,687 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sparklefairy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7921185"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">"According to the Stalking Resource Center, one million women are stalked in the U.S. every year. In two-thirds of the cases where a female victim asks for a police protective order, that order is violated. Earlier this month, Rebecca Griego, a researcher at the University of Washington, was murdered in her office by her ex-boyfriend after she had reported his threats to the university police and Seattle police, changed her phone number, moved out of her apartment, distributed photos and descriptions of her stalker, and sought an order for protection."<br><br>
And when at least one paper reported this, they included sidebars with information on suicide prevention (her murdered killed himself after killing her) but nothing about domestic violence.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
A bit like how our Federal Dept of Family and Community Service has links on their website for a Mens Helpline but nothing for women or victims of domestic violence.<br><br>
it's just so gross it makes me wanna puke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,039 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Liquesce</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7920800"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">To me, the article seems to be connecting a lot of disparate points. Murders are usually committed against intimates and aquaintences, not strangers. Murders are usually isolated events. Murders do not usually turn into mass killings. It is simply not unreasonable for officials to come upon a murder scene and believe that (a) the victim probably knew the killer, and (b) the killer is most likely not in the process of finding another group of people to kill. What this has to do with national attitudes, for better or worse, towards the seriousness of violence against women is beyond me. The facts and figures to that effect are a legitimate and serious issue warranting a lot more scrutiny than they receive. But using VT as a case-in-point for doing so just doesn't make any sense.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
Liquesce thank you for saying what I was trying to say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,159 Posts
(Responding to the OP and the title of this thread.)<br><br>
Oh, puhleeeze. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,789 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Liquesce</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7920800"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">To me, the article seems to be connecting a lot of disparate points. Murders are usually committed against intimates and aquaintences, not strangers. Murders are usually isolated events. Murders do not usually turn into mass killings. It is simply not unreasonable for officials to come upon a murder scene and believe that (a) the victim probably knew the killer, and (b) the killer is most likely not in the process of finding another group of people to kill. What this has to do with national attitudes, for better or worse, towards the seriousness of violence against women is beyond me. The facts and figures to that effect are a legitimate and serious issue warranting a lot more scrutiny than they receive. But using VT as a case-in-point for doing so just doesn't make any sense.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Thank you!!!<br><br>
I'll add that attempting to use the VT icident in this way is likely to do more harm than good for the cause. Violence against women is a horrible, serious issue and I don't think this article helped.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top