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this is kind of a spin off thread of the pku test one, i guess<br><br>
my first question is what exactly are they for? the eye gunk has something to do with std's right?<br><br>
my second question is did you do them? why or why not?
 

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Moving to birth and beyond
 

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The eye goo is supposed to protect against gonorrhea. The Vit K is supposed to help with blood clotting.<br><br>
I didn't do either. I don't have gonorrhea. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> And I had read that the goo blurs the vision, and that the baby's sense of sight is heightened directly after birth to be able to take in the mother's face and all that, so I didn't want to interfere with that.<br><br>
I didn't do K because we didn't have a traumatic birth, and she wasn't going to be poked or cut or anything (and therefore bleed). But I took an alfalfa supplement, jic. I didn't do K because we wanted her to have a peaceful entrance into the world.<br><br>
We did, however, do the PKU, and it was traumatic as hell. We did it when she was 4 days old. She couldn't feel the poke, it was the squeezing to get the blood out that was hell. (Hm, I guess her blood clotting was fine. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> ) If you get that done, I'd say to maybe warm up the area with a warm washcloth to get the blood going, and more poking is better than squeezing.
 

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Yes, the eye goo (usually erythromycin) is if the mother has gonorrhea. I do not, so this child will not get it (my DD did, but that's because I was led to believe at the time that there was no choice in the matter).<br><br>
Vitamin K is for clotting. My feeling on this now, after further research and life learning since my last child, is that there must be a reason babies are born the way they are - why mess with that? I will be taking vitamin K tincture for the next month (mostly alfalfa) to help with natural vitamin K levels. But we will not be doing neither the shot nor the oral dosage for our baby.
 

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My midwife recommends the eye goop after mom and baby have an hour to stare at each other. Erythromycin is used to ward off all kinds of infections and conjunctivitis. She recommends it especially if the baby came in contact with fecal material from the mom.<br><br>
I talked with her a little about vitamin K use and she echoed what PP's have said but also mentioned that is given should you aim to circumcise.
 

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We won't be doing either -- the eye goop doesn't make any sense unless you have an STD, and the vitamin K shot isn't necessary after a normal birth either.<br><br>
We will be doing the pku test, though.
 

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My midwife recommends the eye goop after mom and baby have an hour to stare at each other. Erythromycin is used to ward off all kinds of infections and conjunctivitis. She recommends it especially if the baby came in contact with fecal material from the mom. QUOTE]<br><br>
I just wanted to add that it is common for newborns to get conjunctivitis (not pink eye, but the goo in the corner of the eye) because of a blocked tear duct. A simple massage to the area and some breast milk in the eye clears it up quickly and naturally.<br><br>
It is not necessary to give an antibiotic to every baby "just in case".<br><br>
But I agree that if you want to do it, why not wait a bit. Your new baby will get sleepy after awhile and have a pretty good nap so that seems like a good time to do something that will cloud the vision.
 

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I chose not to have Vitamin K or Erythromycin for dd, but had PKU on midwife's home visit three days after birth. I did not have them because I don't have an STD, and my baby's blood is just perfect the way she was born with it.
 

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We declined both last time & will in the future as well.
 

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I have read that vitamin K started becoming routine when doctors started routinely using forceps (or other mechanical means) to deliver babies. Forceps often bruised a babies head so there was a real concern about excessive bleeding.<br><br>
If your baby is born without all the head trauma than vitamin K should not be necessary-there is no bleeding.<br><br>
IMO it just does not make sense that <span style="text-decoration:underline;">all</span> babies "need" an injection as soon as they are born. If <span style="text-decoration:underline;">all</span> babies are born with low vitamin K that must be the natural, normal thing. Not something unusual and dangerous that requires some action. (It's not like our for-mothers were all injecting vitamin K since woman began.)
 

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I want to point out that IMO, if you are skipping the vitamin K, don't clamp the cord until it stops pulsing. Early cord clamping deprives the baby of blood, and therefore clotting factors. Also start breastfeeding right away and do so frequently. Natural vitamin K is manufactured in the gut by the bacterial flora. The right balance of flora is put there by breastmilk, not infant formula.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>QueenOfThePride</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7950000"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I want to point out that IMO, if you are skipping the vitamin K, don't clamp the cord until it stops pulsing. Early cord clamping deprives the baby of blood, and therefore clotting factors. Also start breastfeeding right away and do so frequently. Natural vitamin K is manufactured in the gut by the bacterial flora. The right balance of flora is put there by breastmilk, not infant formula.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nod.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nod"><br><br>
Great info to keep in mind.
 

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link to a recent discussion on vitamin K --<br><br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=655075" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=655075</a>
 

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We didn't do the eye ointment with my dd, and won't with this baby, either - same reasons as others: the only actual purpose for it is to protect from blindness caused by stds that I don't have!<br><br>
As far as Vit K, I wholeheartedly believe that babies are born the way they are for a reason. Colostrom and early breastmilk is loaded with Vit K, so unless baby has been (or will be) traumatized and will be formula fed, there's no reason for the shot to be routine. HOWEVER, my daughter had it and so will this baby - just because I have Obstetric Cholestasis, and it effects Vit K absorption and I don't want to take the chance... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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obstetric cholestasis actually gives the baby a degree of cholestasis as well- so prevents the baby from absorbing from food sources as well once born until that clears up...
 

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My son got both only because the hospital staff expliciitly ignored my birth plan and did it before I could do anything.<br><br>
But no, this babe will not be getting either. I might remotely consider vit. k if my baby had an extreme amount of trauma, but even then, most likely not. I still need to do more research on it. I do plan on taking alfafa as well, and breastfeeding.<br><br>
As for the mom who took alfafa, how much did you take and when? I have some alfafa tablets but am not sure the protocol.
 

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breastfeeding does not protect from low vitamin K bleeds- infact it is now almost an exclusively breastfed baby problem- most likely because moms do not even eat enough for their own daily requirements studies say about 1/2 of the RDA is what most non-elderly people eat. Old women tend to eat more greens-- the RDA will be raising and at that point if we don't improve our eating habits we will only be getting about 1/6 the daily requirements--- alfalfa tablets are a moderate source of vitamin K -- that they change conditions in moms points to how deficient they really are---
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mwherbs</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7957514"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">breastfeeding does not protect from low vitamin K bleeds- infact it is now almost an exclusively breastfed baby problem- most likely because moms do not even eat enough for their own daily requirements studies say about 1/2 of the RDA is what most non-elderly people eat. Old women tend to eat more greens-- the RDA will be raising and at that point if we don't improve our eating habits we will only be getting about 1/6 the daily requirements--- alfalfa tablets are a moderate source of vitamin K -- that they change conditions in moms points to how deficient they really are---</div>
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Actually, Vit. K is more abundant in alfalfa than in leafy greens. Here's a <a href="http://www.springboard4health.com/notebook/herbs_alfalfa.html" target="_blank">cite</a>.<br><br>
Anyway, it's probably unnecessary. I took it to make our doctor feel better. I probably won't take it next time. Someone asked how much to take - I took a tablet each day that I remembered to do so. I think the tablets are 500 mg.
 

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ok so where in that site does it say what the content is-- you know when the science folks were playing around they first isolated vitamin K in alfalfa oil- but that doesn't make it a "rich" source of it. Fully mature plants might, just might be about the same as say cabbage leaves- the tables have been revised and the info sources I have don't include alfalfa leaves in the content-<br>
but sprouts are about 10 mcg/cup<br>
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in the studies on osteoperosis 300 is the minimum to prevent bones from breaking-- the Japanese may supplement in the 5000 range theraputicly for a time, estimates of primitive diets say about 7 percent of daily caloric intake was in greens..... that is probably the amount that we should be getting in a day<br><br>
here is a link where you can download vitamin K table<br><br><a href="http://www.nutrition.gov/index.php?mode=topic&subject=ng_composition&topic=Vitamins%20and%20Minerals&d_subject=Whats%20In%20Food" target="_blank">http://www.nutrition.gov/index.php?m...ts%20In%20Food</a>
 
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